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23 Sep

It’s a little obscure, but that hasn’t stopped one producer slapping a hefty price tag on his wine.

By W. Blake Gray | Posted Saturday, 21-Sep-2019

Sometimes the price of a wine is intended to create respect. This is consumer psychology; if a wine costs $300, people think: “That must be good.”

Enter the first $300 Sagrantino.

Marco Caprai has spent most of his career promoting Sagrantino, a thick-skinned, tannic grape indigenous to Umbria, a region just north of Rome that has had trouble earning the respect of its neighbors in Tuscany. He led a movement to revive Sagrantino from near-extinction in the early 1970s.

Now he’s trying to get it into the heavyweight class of wine varietals. So he created a $300 version, Arnaldo-Caprai Spinning Beauty Montefalco Sagrantino. But unlike most $300 wines, which earn their prices on some combination of terroir and mystique, Spinning Beauty hopes to justify its cost from storage time.

Spinning Beauty is not released until it is 10 years old. The current release is the 2009. Most of that time – eight years – was spent aging in new French oak barrels. This came after it was fermented inside DIFFERENT new French oak barrels.

“This is the next step of Sagrantino,” Caprai said by Skype from Italy. “Sagrantino is a very good grape, but a very short story in the wine of today. Generally when people consider the Sagrantino, it’s young. This is one of the important characteristics of the grape. Longevity. It’s one of the most important characteristics of international wine. The project of Spinning Beauty is to give more attention to the capacity of aging for Sagrantino. It’s a project to contribute to the appreciation of the Italian native grape.”

You might expect the wine to be oaky, but it’s not so much as you’d imagine. It is, however, tannic as hell when you open the bottle. I opened it for dinner and, though it had a tempting aroma, complex and dense, I couldn’t enjoy it on the palate. The next morning I had a glass beside me while I interviewed Caprai, and I showed him the glass, but it was still pretty tannic to me. I left the glass and the bottle open all day.

That night, after being open for 24 hours, Spinning Beauty finally unwound and revealed layers of dark fruit, good balance and an extremely long finish. I had no trouble enjoying it. So, word to the buyer: open it the night before you want to drink it.

Caprai’s ideal peer group of wines are actually quite a bit higher in price than $300.

“There are some classic wine of Europe that are released after a very long time,” Caprai told me. “There were not a lot of wine with these characteristics. Vega Sicilia Unico. Penfolds Grange. Screaming Eagle. But not a lot of others. There was a small group of super wine.”

Penfolds Grange is a pretty good comparison. The Grange is expensive, and oaky as hell when it’s released, but if you wait long enough the Shiraz is rich enough to absorb all that oak. Spinning Beauty is more tannic, but less oaky, than Penfolds Grange.

“The technique is very classic. We did an integral fermentation,” Caprai said. “It is a fermentation of the red grapes inside the barrel. The barrel was open from the top. We put inside the batch of grapes after crush it. We start with a very slow fermentation because we put it in a cold room. The grapes remain for 10 days. After it started the fermentation, we bring up the temperature and transform the sugar to alcohol. We leave the juice on the skin for 30 to 40 days. People use it for very high-level wine in Bordeaux and Napa Valley.”

The first vintage of Spinning Beauty was 2006. Caprai says they have been putting aside five barrels per year and they choose the best three for the final blend.

“For us, it’s the essence of Sagrantino,” Caprai said. “The characteristic is the extreme capacity to maintain the quality for a very long time. Normally it’s very complex. We think that it’s ready now, but you could drink for another 20 years, 30 years.”

The name Spinning Beauty is an homage to Marco’s father Arnaldo Caprai, an Italian textile magnate who founded the winery. He expected Marco to follow him into the textile business.

“I haven’t worked very long with my father. My father was a very difficult man. Not easy,” Caprai said. “When I was a young man I prefer to work in the wine than in the textile. I don’t want to be only the son of Arnaldo. I prefer that Arnaldo was the father of Marco.”

Marco says that when he took over the winery, Montefalco had only five wineries, and today there are more than 80.

“Wine was one of the last challenge for the man of today,” Caprai said. “It’s a challenge where it’s possible to make something special. To put a small village on the world map of the wine area. To give to the next generation a legacy. About the capacity of the men to transform the land, the village, the economy of the area.”

He says his efforts at promoting Sagrantino – Montefalco Sagrantino got DOCG status in 1992 – also led to a revitalization of the restaurant scene. People came to Montefalco for wine, and they wanted to stay for dinner.

“Today in Montefalco there are more than 50 different restaurants,” Caprai said. “When I started there was one only. There are some very good restaurants. The food of Umbria was not complex. We have fantastic extra virgin olive oil. We have fantastic truffles. The tradition in Umbria is the lamb. The speck. And also the pigeons. Sagrantino is a perfect matching.”

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21 Sep




By Mathew Lyons

Published:  20 September, 2019

Climate change has transformed wine production globally, according to the latest edition of the World Atlas of Wine.

The most immediate impact is on the wine harvest, which is now on average up to four weeks earlier than it was 20 or 30 years ago in both the northern and southern hemisphere.

The Bordeaux harvest now often starts in August, whereas it traditionally began in late September or early October. At Châteauneuf-du-Pape in the Rhône, the harvest has been brought forward by a month since the 1940s.

A secondary effect of climate change is the spread of wine making into latitudes where it was formerly impractical. The book highlights the beneficial impact this has had on wine production in England, Germany and Canada, in particular, and notes the establishment of commercial wine industries in Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark and Sweden.

Wine production methods have also been forced to adapt. Vines in established vineyards are being planted both at higher elevations and in wind-exposed areas to slow the ripening process. Likewise, many winemakers now need to protect their crops from over-exposure to the sun, whereas traditionally, they would have been attempting to give their vines as much sunshine as possible.

Plantings of grapes such as Cabernet Sauvignon are increasingly being replaced with hardier varieties that are better adapted to high temperatures.

Other new features of the book include a focus on emerging wine regions such as the Lebanon, Israel, Uruguay and Brazil.

The eighth edition of The World Atlas of Wine by Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson is published by Mitchell Beazley on 3 October.





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20 Sep

If you’re rich and famous you’ve probably known about
Jeffrey Epstein for a long time. The rest of us have only recently learned
about him from the barrage of news stories with headlines like these:

  • How Jeffrey Epstein’s Death Became a Political
    Football—CNN News
  • Jeffrey Epstein Accuser Jennifer Araoz Sues
    Ghislaine—NBC News
  • Jeffrey Epstein’s Death and Role in “Ponzi
    Scheme” Investigated—CBS News
  • Conspiracy Theories Swamp Jeffrey Epstein Case
    From Fringe to Mainstream—Fox News
  • The Day Jeffrey Epstein Said He Had Dirt on
    Powerful People—New York Times
  • Sasse Demands Barr “Rip Up” 2008 Epstein Deal,
    Bring Co-Conspirators to Justice—New York Post

I’m more interested in what Jeffrey Epstein’s life and death
can tell us about men, women, sex, and power, topics I’ve been studying and
writing about for fifty years. I also want to know how it can help men and
women live fuller, more successful, and joyful lives. 

From the point of view of an evolutionary psychologist,
Jeffrey Epstein was just doing what men have been doing for the last two
million years—Trying to have sex with as many young, beautiful women as he
could and accumulating enough fame and wealth to attract more young, beautiful
women. To do that he had to have a lot of other people, both male and female,
who shared his values and beliefs.

In his book Sex, Power, and Partisanship: How
Evolutionary Science Makes Sense of Our Political Divide, Dr. Hector A.
Garcia, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University
of Texas Health Science Center, describes “how evolution programmed our minds
with mating strategies to help us reproduce amid a fierce field of competition,
how men and women employ different strategies to achieve reproductive fitness.”

I’ve written about these issues in a series of articles
on The Good Men Manifesto. The most recent article “The
One Fact About Men That Drives Men’s Anger and Fear of Women”
 had a number
of facts that can help us learn from Jeffrey Epstein’s life and death. In the
article, I quote Roy F. Baumeister, one of the world’s leading social
scientists. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 21 books. In his
book, Is There Anything Good About Men? How Cultures Flourish By
Exploiting Men, he says, “Of all the people who ever reached adulthood, maybe
80% of the women but only 40% of the men reproduced.” He goes on to say,
“That’s a stunning difference. Of all humans ever born, most women became
mothers, but most men did not become fathers. You wouldn’t realize this by
walking through an American suburb today with its tidy couples.” Baumeister
says, “I consider it the single most underappreciated fact about men.”

What are the implications of this one fact? It means that
throughout human history men, like Genghis Khan, the fearsome Mongol warrior of
the 13th century, became rich and famous and had more than his share of young
women and had lots of babies as a result. These practices continue to this day.

The problem for people like Jeffrey Epstein and other “elite
friends and associates” in Epstein’s little black book, which includes Prince
Andrew, Steve Bannon, Bill Clinton, Bill Cosby, Alan Dershowitz, Sarah Ferguson
(Duchess of York), Ted Kennedy, Henry Kissinger, David Koch, Ghislaine Maxwell,
Charlie Rose, Donald Trump, Ivanka Trump, and many others; the era of powerful
men and women who ignore sexual violence as simply “men doing what men do” is
over.

In fact, it ended a hundred years ago when thousands of
women, with support of hundreds of men, fought for and passed the
19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution giving women the right to vote. It
has continued with the #MeToo movement which has broken the silence of
sexual abuse forever. 

According to an article in Time magazine, “The
#MeToo movement has become a worldwide phenomenon, searched for on Google in
196 countries in the past year.” Time named The Silence Breakers as
the 2017 Person of the Year, honoring not one individual, but all of the women
involved – and the cause as a whole.

I recently witnessed the clash of the old and new worlds on
an episode of the Netflix series Outlanders, based on the books by Diana
Gabaldon. In season 1, former World War II nurse Claire Randall and her husband
Frank are visiting Inverness, Scotland, when she is carried back in time to the
18th century from the standing stones at Craigh na Dun. She falls in with a
group of rebel Scottish Highlanders from Clan MacKenzie, who are being pursued
by English redcoats led by Captain Jonathan “Black Jack” Randall. She marries a
Highlander, Jamie Fraser, out of necessity, but they quickly fall in love.

In episode 6, titled The Reckoning, the old world where
men were dominant and controlled their women, clashes with the new world of
gender equality and what Riane Eisler, author of The Chalice and the
Blade, calls the clash between a Dominator system and Partnership
System. 

Jamie has told his new wife, Clare, to wait with another clansman
while he takes care of some business. He explained that danger was everywhere
and she should stay just where she was until he returned. She disobeys his
orders, and is captured by Black Jack, taken back to the castle and is about to
be raped when Jamie and his men sneak into the castle and rescue her. 

He plans to punish Clare for disobeying his orders and
putting them all in danger. “None of this would have happened if you’d have
just stayed where I told you,” he says. Clare realizes her error had put
everyone in danger and apologizes. But that’s not enough for him and he demands
that she take her punishment, a belt whipping on her bare bottom. She refuses
and, being stronger, he forces the whipping, and assumes things will now be
fine between them. He has asserted his male authority and she has been properly
punished. 

But he realizes he has damaged the relationship and has a
change of heart. “This is how my father did things, and his father before him,
and on back through the generations,” Jamie says, “But I love you Clare and I
see things will have to be different between you and me.” He swears on his
sword, his God, and his life that if he ever should strike her again that he
would die by this very sword. Clare is moved and there is a touching love
scene.

Yet, that’s not the end of the story. The next time they
make love, with him on top of her and both in ecstatic sexual excitement, she
rolls him over on his back, pulls out her own knife and puts it to his throat
and drawing on the power of a modern-day woman looks down into his fearful eyes
and says, “Jamie Fraser, if you ever raise your hand against me again, I will
cut your heart out.” There’s no doubt that she means it. When women have real
power, men learn to change for the better.

What we’re seeing in Jeffrey Epstein saga, is the last gasp
of the Dominator culture. A small group of men and women benefitted from the
old culture represented by Epstein. A much larger group of men and women will
benefit as the Dominator culture gives way to the Partnership culture where we
can all bring into being, in the words of my colleague Charles
Eisenstein, The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know is Possible.

This article first appeared on Jed’s blog.

Image by Alexas_Fotos from Pixabay


Credit: Source link

19 Sep

Marilyn Bechtel/PW

OAKLAND, Calif. – After almost 12 months without a contract, some 4,000 Kaiser Permanente mental health clinicians in California, and their union, the National Union of Healthcare Workers, are continuing to demand that the giant health care corporation establish the conditions the clinicians need to care for their patients in a timely and effective manner.

After starting their day Sept. 17 with a 6 a.m. picket line in front of Kaiser’s Northern California Regional Headquarters here, dozens of psychologists and other clinicians were joined by patients, community and labor supporters who rallied to urge the giant health care corporation to provide its mental health patients the same prompt, quality care it provides those with physical complaints.

Mickey Fitzpatrick, a psychologist at Kaiser’s facility in nearby Pleasanton and a member of NUHW’s bargaining committee, outlined the problems he and his colleagues face. At Pleasanton and Kaiser’s other northern California clinics, he said, schedules are routinely fully booked many weeks in advance, forcing patients to wait as long as six to eight weeks for a return appointment.

Fitzpatrick said he and his co-workers are so desperate to help their patients that they skip lunches, work overtime and cut short other essential functions in order to do the needed clinical work.

“Kaiser has $46 billion in cash and reserves,” he said. “Yet it chronically understaffs its mental health clinics. Even when it tries to hire more therapists, it can’t keep up with its growing membership and replace the therapists who are leaving in frustration because they can’t provide the care they know their patients need.”

Signs carried by rally participants told of the tragic consequences the delays have had for some patients.

Jennifer Shanoski, president of the Peralta Federation of Teachers and a teacher of chemistry at Oakland’s Merritt College, told the crowd, “I’ve seen first-hand how mental health challenges can get in the way of learning, teaching, parenting, and simply living a decent life here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I’ve seen my students struggling with stressors – school, relationships, and survival in an economy so obviously geared for the super-wealthy.”

Noting that nearly half of U.S. adults will seek mental health services at some time in their lives, she shared her own story of seeking care for herself and her young son, only to finally end up paying for private care because of Kaiser’s delays.

“I know I’m fortunate because I could afford to pay those costs,” Shanoski said. “Not everyone can, and no one should have to. And when people can’t pay, that can lead to tragedy.”

Marilyn Bechtel/PW

Laura Fischler, a social worker at Kaiser Pleasanton, spoke of the problems patients face when they try to use the telephone service Kaiser has introduced in an effort to cut wait times. One such client “disclosed to me that he had attempted to hang himself in his garage, and didn’t feel comfortable telling the therapist on the phone about that,” she said. “He had decided before meeting with me, that if it didn’t go well, he knew where there was a gun in the house.”

Every Kaiser therapist’s biggest fear, she said, is that while coping with long wait times between therapy sessions, one of their patients will take a tragic action the therapist did not foresee.

Meanwhile, mental health staff at Kaiser’s clinic in nearby Pleasanton were holding a one-day strike on behalf of their patients.

The mental health workers chose Sept. 17 for a day of action because, they said, Kaiser had given them an ultimatum: Either agree by that date to accept the same substandard contract that two months ago, 92 percent of them had voted to reject, or lose a 3 percent retroactive pay increase covering the year they have been working without a contract.

Kaiser had also rejected a counter-proposal from the mental health workers, to significantly reduce wait times by hiring additional full-time clinicians, to establish crisis services at every clinic, and give clinicians enough time to conduct critical patient care work including following up on referrals, responding to patients’ calls and communicating with social service agencies.

In a statement Sept. 16, NUHW President Sal Rosselli called the health care giant’s rejection of the union’s offer “a blatant attempt to intimidate workers into ratifying a contract that doesn’t go far enough to improve Kaiser’s mental health care system,” and “further evidence that executives at Kaiser’s health plan and The Permanente Medical Group don’t care about addressing the giant HMO’s mental health crisis or respect their mental health clinicians.”

It’s already been a long road for the clinicians.

After working without a contract starting in October 2018, they held a week-long strike in December. In June they called off a threatened open-ended strike following progress in bargaining, and in response to California legislative leaders’ urging both sides to return to the bargaining table.

In a survey their union conducted earlier this year, 71 percent of Kaiser clinicians said wait times for treatment appointments have grown longer over the past two years, and more than three-quarters said they must give patients return appointments further into the future than is clinically appropriate.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Marilyn BechtelMarilyn Bechtel



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18 Sep

Researchers will present clinical data on the efficacy and safety of the medication pitolisant (WAKIX) for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy during the World Sleep 2019 meeting in Vancouver, Canada from Sept. 20-25, according to a press release from the biopharmaceutical company Harmony Biosciences.

In a presentation, results will be presented from a randomized, double-blind study that evaluated the abuse potential of pitolisant compared with the stimulant phentermine HCl (C-IV) and placebo in nondependent recreational stimulant users. In addition, seven scientific posters will be presented, including a new post hoc analysis of pooled data from two randomized, placebo-controlled studies of pitolisant in adults with narcolepsy that evaluated the efficacy of the treatment in patients with a high burden of narcolepsy symptoms.

Pitolisant was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy.

“Harmony looks forward to sharing clinical data for WAKIX at the World Sleep 2019 meeting, which will shed light on its product profile as the first and only approved treatment for patients with narcolepsy that is not scheduled as a controlled substance,” Harmony’s chief medical officer, Jeffrey Dayno, MD, says in a statement.

“These data reflect the breadth of scientific evidence in support of WAKIX, and further demonstrate its uniqueness as a first-in-class molecule with a novel mechanism of action. We look forward to presenting these data to a global audience,” says Dayno.

The abstracts being presented include:

  • Oral Presentation: Evaluation of Abuse Potential of the Narcolepsy Medication Pitolisant (September 25, 4:30-6 pm) J Dayno, C Scart-Grès, P Robert, J-C Schwartz, B Setnik.
  • Poster Presentation: Efficacy of Pitolisant in Patients with High Burden of Narcolepsy Symptoms (September 24, 5:30-7 pm) C Davis, L Krahn, B Vaughn, M Thorpy.
  • Poster Presentation: The Safety and Tolerability of Pitolisant in the Treatment of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and Cataplexy in Adult Patients with Narcolepsy: An Open-Label, Expanded Access Program in the United States (September 24, 5:30-7 pm) E Bauer, C Davis, A Patroneva, J Dayno, M Thorpy. 
  • Poster Presentation: Long-Term Evaluation of Safety and Efficacy of Pitolisant in Narcolepsy: HARMONY 3 Study (September 23, 5:30-7 pm) Y Dauvilliers, I Arnulf, C Scart-Grès, I Lecomte, C Caussé, J Dayno, J-C Schwartz.
  • Poster Presentation: Safety and Tolerability of Pitolisant in the Treatment of Adults with Narcolepsy: Integrated Data from Clinical Studies (September 23, 5:30-7 pm) C Scart-Grès, C Momah, M Roy, K Maski, S Piris, R Bogan.
  • Poster Presentation: Efficacy and Safety of Pitolisant in Patients With Narcolepsy: A Review of Clinical Trials (September 24, 5:30-7 pm) Y Dauvilliers, J-C Schwartz, C Davis, J Dayno.
  • Poster Presentation: Pitolisant in Combination With Other Medications for the Management of Narcolepsy (September 23, 5:30-7 pm) K Doghramji, C Davis, A Patroneva, J-C Schwartz, C Scart-Grès, P Robert, T Duvauchelle, S Wanaski, A Krystal.
  • Poster Presentation: Burden of Narcolepsy: A Survey of Patients and Physicians (September 23, 5:30-7 pm) M Thorpy, J Hopper, A Patroneva.

Credit: Source link

17 Sep

Me v the World

Colour Pop Me v the World Ultra Glossy Lip ($6.00 for 0.11 oz.) is a rich, medium-dark brown with strong, warm orange-red undertones and a cream finish that was quite shiny. The texture was smooth, spreadable, and non-sticky with a thicker feel but never felt heavy or glue-like on my lips. The pigmentation was nearly opaque in a single layer, though it was designed to have more medium coverage.

I wish ColourPop would switch to a more traditional doe-foot applicator as the brush-style applicator makes it harder to spread the product along the edges cleanly. This shade had enough opacity to support a really even application of color, and there was only a touch that sank into my lip lines but not enough that it was noticeable at a normal viewing distance. It stayed on nicely for four hours and felt hydrating while worn.

Formula Overview

$6.00/0.11 oz. – $54.55 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to have “hi-shine” with a “non-sticky” texture that “feels amazing” and includes five finishes “from 3-D pearl to sheer tinted colour.” They are designed to be a sheerer formula, so many shades are sheer with a smattering of shimmer or sparkle and then a few are more tinted with sheer to semi-sheer coverage but no shimmer. Each gloss has a short, brush-type applicator, which worked better than I expected and didn’t leave streaky results behind (in general). They had a sweet, vanilla scent but no discernible taste.

The “Tinted” finish (“glass-like shine with tint of sheer colour and no shimmer”) was the least consistent–sometimes prone to unevenness and getting into lip lines, particularly with deeper/richer shades, whereas Pearlescent (“glass-like shine with subtle shimmer”) and Prismatic (“glass-like shine with floating multi dimensional pearl and glitters”) are sheer to translucent with the major difference being finer shimmer in the Pearlescent finish and larger, more glitter-like particles in the Prismatic finish. Both finishes tended to look plush and more smoothing on my lips. The Creme finish is a “medium-coverage gloss with a creamy finish that does not contain any pearls or glitter.” The Metallic is described as a “full-coverage gloss with a mix of pearl and metallic finishes.”

The wear time varied by shade but the sheerer ones tended to wear between two and three hours as the formula was, indeed, non-sticky and smooth, which made them lighter-weight and comfortable to wear but shorter wearing. A lot of the sheerer shades ran together, so I would recommend just picking up one or two rather than several as the differences are likely to be lost! Also, keep in mind that sheerer lip colors can look different from person to person due to much of the natural lip color coming through.

Browse all of our Colour Pop Ultra Glossy Lip swatches.

R We Done

Colour Pop R We Done Ultra Glossy Lip ($6.00 for 0.11 oz.) is a light, peachy brown with warm undertones and a cream finish. It had semi-opaque pigmentation in a single layer, which applied somewhat evenly, though it was hard to get a truly even lay down of product. There was a bit of color that settled into my lip lines, but I didn’t feel like I could tell in person (between the opacity and high-shine finish). It lasted well for four hours and felt lightly moisturizing over time.

Formula Overview

$6.00/0.11 oz. – $54.55 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to have “hi-shine” with a “non-sticky” texture that “feels amazing” and includes five finishes “from 3-D pearl to sheer tinted colour.” They are designed to be a sheerer formula, so many shades are sheer with a smattering of shimmer or sparkle and then a few are more tinted with sheer to semi-sheer coverage but no shimmer. Each gloss has a short, brush-type applicator, which worked better than I expected and didn’t leave streaky results behind (in general). They had a sweet, vanilla scent but no discernible taste.

The “Tinted” finish (“glass-like shine with tint of sheer colour and no shimmer”) was the least consistent–sometimes prone to unevenness and getting into lip lines, particularly with deeper/richer shades, whereas Pearlescent (“glass-like shine with subtle shimmer”) and Prismatic (“glass-like shine with floating multi dimensional pearl and glitters”) are sheer to translucent with the major difference being finer shimmer in the Pearlescent finish and larger, more glitter-like particles in the Prismatic finish. Both finishes tended to look plush and more smoothing on my lips. The Creme finish is a “medium-coverage gloss with a creamy finish that does not contain any pearls or glitter.” The Metallic is described as a “full-coverage gloss with a mix of pearl and metallic finishes.”

The wear time varied by shade but the sheerer ones tended to wear between two and three hours as the formula was, indeed, non-sticky and smooth, which made them lighter-weight and comfortable to wear but shorter wearing. A lot of the sheerer shades ran together, so I would recommend just picking up one or two rather than several as the differences are likely to be lost! Also, keep in mind that sheerer lip colors can look different from person to person due to much of the natural lip color coming through.

Browse all of our Colour Pop Ultra Glossy Lip swatches.

Spacemaker

Colour Pop Spacemaker Ultra Glossy Lip ($6.00 for 0.11 oz.) is a brighter, peachy coral with warm, orange undertones and a glossy, cream finish. It had nearly opaque coverage in a single layer, though it was supposed to have more medium coverage. The applicator, despite being smaller, actually pulled out plenty of product so in order to get sheerer coverage, I’d recommend wiping a bit off prior to application.

The texture was smooth, spreadable, and felt more like a hybrid cream-gel formula as it wasn’t tacky but was denser and a little thicker (but not heavy). The product went on decently, especially for this type of finish and format, but there were faint streaks along the outer edges of my lips and some product settled into my lip lines. It wore well for three and a half hours and felt hydrating over time.

Formula Overview

$6.00/0.11 oz. – $54.55 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to have “hi-shine” with a “non-sticky” texture that “feels amazing” and includes five finishes “from 3-D pearl to sheer tinted colour.” They are designed to be a sheerer formula, so many shades are sheer with a smattering of shimmer or sparkle and then a few are more tinted with sheer to semi-sheer coverage but no shimmer. Each gloss has a short, brush-type applicator, which worked better than I expected and didn’t leave streaky results behind (in general). They had a sweet, vanilla scent but no discernible taste.

The “Tinted” finish (“glass-like shine with tint of sheer colour and no shimmer”) was the least consistent–sometimes prone to unevenness and getting into lip lines, particularly with deeper/richer shades, whereas Pearlescent (“glass-like shine with subtle shimmer”) and Prismatic (“glass-like shine with floating multi dimensional pearl and glitters”) are sheer to translucent with the major difference being finer shimmer in the Pearlescent finish and larger, more glitter-like particles in the Prismatic finish. Both finishes tended to look plush and more smoothing on my lips. The Creme finish is a “medium-coverage gloss with a creamy finish that does not contain any pearls or glitter.” The Metallic is described as a “full-coverage gloss with a mix of pearl and metallic finishes.”

The wear time varied by shade but the sheerer ones tended to wear between two and three hours as the formula was, indeed, non-sticky and smooth, which made them lighter-weight and comfortable to wear but shorter wearing. A lot of the sheerer shades ran together, so I would recommend just picking up one or two rather than several as the differences are likely to be lost! Also, keep in mind that sheerer lip colors can look different from person to person due to much of the natural lip color coming through.

Browse all of our Colour Pop Ultra Glossy Lip swatches.

Credit: Source link