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24 Sep

San Francisco Chronicle wine critic Esther Mobley was named feature wine writer of the year Thursday in the Louis Roederer International Wine Writers Awards, a prestigious international competition.

Mobley was recognized for her body of work in 2018, which included “Battle for Napa Valley’s future,” an insightful look at the 50th anniversary of the Napa Valley Agricultural Preserve and the controversial 2018 ballot measure, Measure C, that sought to limit new vineyard plantings.

In reporting the story, Mobley found Napa Valley bitterly divided over the measure. She went on to detail in the article how “Measure C, and the oak trees it aims to protect, epitomize a battle over what Napa Valley has become and what it should be.”

“The great wine country of California has met its match in Esther Mobley, who has in a few short years become not only the go-to expert on the region’s industry and its world-renowned wines. She’s also the chronicler of a way of life, found in the stories of the winemakers, and the histories of the vineyards and their future under climate change,” said Kitty Morgan, deputy managing editor of The Chronicle. “It’s her amazing range — whether she takes up pop culture trends or the serious business of cult wines — that sets her apart.”

The Roederer awards — named after famed French wine producer Louis Roederer — is arguably the most prestigious writing award for wine journalists outside of an award from the James Beard Foundation.

“This award doesn’t just recognize my individual work — it also reflects The Chronicle’s amazing, ongoing commitment to wine coverage,” Mobley said. “I’m lucky to be the only wine critic at a daily newspaper on the West Coast, and we’re uniquely positioned to tell the story of California wine.”

Mobley joined The Chronicle in 2015 to cover the state’s wine, beer and spirits. She previously was an assistant editor at Wine Spectator magazine in New York.

Justin Phillips is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: jphillips@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @JustMrPhillips


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21 Sep


Sojourn Cellars of Sonoma, California won first place in the 2019 Wine Spectator Video Contest this week with the video entitled “Journey to the Edge of the Earth.” Sojourn rose to the top among hundreds of video entries, and competed in the finals against eight other submissions from across the globe for the 2019 crown. The winning two-minute video can be viewed here.

This year, in the thirteenth annual Wine Spectator contest, the theme of Wine Wanderlust sparked entries ranging from serious to romantic, and even humorous stories of where wine took entrants. The regions in the finals ranged from California and Oregon to Spain, Croatia and Australia.

For Sojourn winemaker, Erich Bradley, the expansive and untamed Sonoma Coast appellation was an obvious and compelling choice. “This video reveals what it is like when you go out and visit these Sonoma Coast vineyards. It is like Narnia, an alternate universe. The landscape is pretty dramatic in and of itself,” explained Bradley. “There is no substitute for being there. Experiencing the video just brings you closer.”

From the beginning of Bradley’s winemaking career in 1998, he has consistently embraced the idea of discovery and worked to capture a sense of place in every wine he has made. Bradley’s passion for Pinot noir combines with his journey exploring and sharing his experiences with the rugged Sonoma Coast to create a perfect pairing as shown in the winning video.

Sojourn co-founders Craig Haserot and Bradley began making hand-crafted Pinot noir wines with their 2004 Sojourn Sangiacomo Vineyard Pinot noir (which received 92 points from Wine Spectator). Bradley’s love affair with Pinot noir intensified with that first single vineyard wine, which led to the current Sojourn portfolio that has grown to 21 memorable wines, including 14 from the Sonoma Coast.

While making the video was not an easy task, Haserot compares the process to the complexity of making wine from the diverse and challenging Sonoma Coast. “The Sonoma Coast appellation is extensive and varied. No two vineyards, vintages or wines are ever the same. All of our Sonoma Coast wines are from vineyards in very different locations in terms of microclimate, elevation, soil and terroir, yet all lie within the same appellation. From our home base in the town of Sonoma, we work with vineyards that are 20 minutes away and others that are a two-hour one-way drive away.”

Wine Spectator wrote about the winners, “Their video offers an inside look at Bradley’s journey in the Sonoma Coast appellation. This year’s contest theme, ‘Wine Wanderlust,’ felt natural for Bradley and Haserot, who met over a tennis game and bonded over their love of wine, specifically Pinot Noir, for its ability to express terroir. They eventually founded Sojourn Cellars and their first vintage, 2004, began their challenging exploration of Sonoma Coast, where weather conditions change on a dime thanks to its proximity to the Pacific.”

Sojourn Cellars will be honored October 17 – 19, 2019 at the Wine Spectator New York Wine Experience in Manhattan, where their winning video will be screened for thousands of attendees.

The “Journey to the Edge of the Earth” video was produced and directed by Michael Housewright and filmed by Steven Mortinson.

Sojourn Cellars, founded in Sonoma in 2001 by Craig Haserot and Erich Bradley, is a small-production, luxury, boutique winery that crafts high-quality Pinot noir, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon wines that are sold on allocation to a mailing list members, as well as a selection of high-end restaurateurs and retailers, around the world.

Sojourn Cellars can be found on these social media platforms: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and Vimeo. For more about Sojourn Cellars, or to schedule a wine tasting in their downtown Sonoma Tasting Salon, or to sign up for news from the winery, visit SojournCellars.com or call 707.933.9753.

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20 Sep

Sojourn winemaker Erich Bradley parked his truck at the end of the vineyard and turned the engine off. Sitting beside him was Sojourn co-founder Craig Haserot. It was 102° F and both were sweating as the interior of the cab began to swelter. They’d come to this hopefully quiet patch of wine country to record voiceover for a short film about their journey into wine.

They laugh about it now, but that voiceover segment was the most difficult part of the shoot. “It felt like an eternity,” Bradley told Wine Spectator. “Every time a tractor drove by, we had to redo everything.” But their persistence paid off: “Journey to the Edge of the Earth” is Wine Spectator’s 2019 Video Contest winner.

Their video offers an inside look at Bradley’s journey in the Sonoma Coast appellation. This year’s contest theme, “Wine Wanderlust,” felt natural for Bradley and Haserot, who met over a tennis game and bonded over their love of wine, specifically Pinot Noir, for its ability to express terroir. They eventually founded Sojourn and their first vintage, 2004, began their challenging exploration of Sonoma Coast, where weather conditions change on a dime thanks to its proximity to the Pacific.

Bradley says he wants viewers to learn “how geographically big and complex the puzzle of the Sonoma Coast appellation is … Telling that story allows people to connect with us and understand what we’re about.” Bradley and Haserot’s Video Contest Grand Prize includes two full weekend passes to Wine Spectator’s New York Wine Experience, where the video will be screened for more than 1,000 attendees.


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This year’s second-place winner, “From the Bayou to the Bay,” also showcased Sonoma. Lawyer and winemaker Arthur Murray of Flambeaux Wines takes viewers on a symbolic trip from the historic streets of his native New Orleans to his family-owned winery in Healdsburg, Calif., where friends and family take part in the winemaking process. As Murray passes the torch to his kids, he hopes viewers will take away the same lessons he learned from his leap of faith: “Don’t be afraid to chase a dream,” Murray told Wine Spectator. “If your heart’s in it, you make it work.”

This year’s third-place winner, “Winetastic Path Home,” takes viewers to Zagreb, the capital of Croatia. Local filmmaker Martina Miličević shows viewers how wine allows people to balance passion, nature and connection. She cuts and mixes vineyard and street scenes to show that wandering doesn’t require great distance.

“I made a commitment to myself that I would do my best to show as many people as I can how close they are to this enchanting wine world,” Miličević told Wine Spectator.

There are many more inspiring stories amid the 2019 Video Contest finalists. From winemakers to wine lovers of all degrees, there is a story for everyone! Watch all the winners, finalists and honorable mentions share how wine took them on the road less traveled.

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27 Aug

Claire McIlwaine from the University of Plymouth has become the first dental care professional to win a prize at the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) awards

Claire, the programme lead for BSc Dental Therapy and Hygiene (DTH), won the Oral B inter-professional educator award and became the first dental care professional to win in any ADEE category.

As the IPE award’s sole recipient, Clare was selected following entries from dental schools across the continent.

She collected her award at the recent ADEE ceremony in Berlin, Germany.

Her work has focused on making Inter-Professional Education (IPE) the core of the BSc programme; facilitating shared learning with the University’s BDS dental surgery students.

The DTH course is three years long compared with dental surgery’s five, but year one sees all students share teaching, learning and assessments.

Where scope of practice overlaps, the shared teaching continues into year two, along with clinical working in year three.

Innovative way of working

She explains: ‘In order to provide effective, patient centred, shared care, the dental team need to work together and understand each other’s roles in the provision of patient care.

‘Although a dental therapists’ and dentists’ roles differ, we are all ultimately striving for the same thing, so it’s great that we’ve been able to implement this innovative way of working into the very core of the curriculum at Plymouth.

‘I’m so pleased to have been recognised by the ADEE for my role in designing and implementing this curriculum, and look forward to welcoming more dental professionals of the future to our programmes.’

Head of Peninsula Dental School at the University of Plymouth, Professor Christopher Tredwin, said: ‘Clare’s work has been outstanding – the shared curriculum promotes inter-professional skills in environments akin to real-life practice, and has been extremely well received by students.

‘The programmes’ integration has placed Peninsula Dental School at the forefront of dental education, and her award is thoroughly deserved.’


Link

University of Plymouth

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12 Aug

Newberg, Ore.—Chehalem Winery took home the top honor for best packaging redesign at the 2019 Wines & Vines Packaging Design Awards last week in Yountville, California. Chehalem was the only Oregon winery to win an award.

“We felt an obligation to develop a refreshed brand that represents the history and quality of the wines,” said Gary Mortensen, President of the Stoller Wine Group. “Chehalem has always over-delivered in quality for the price. We wanted the packaging to reflect this philosophy. The reaction to date has been overwhelmingly positive.”

Chehalem is a tenured brand, producing wine for more than 30 years, pre-dating the Chehalem Mountains AVA. Working with design firm CF Napa, Chehalem took an intentional approach to celebrate its name, which means Valley of Flowers in the Native American language, Calapooia. The team also focused one of its estate vineyards, Corral Creek, which is home to the winery. The site has iconic wavy rows, which added a key element in the design process, and from that a much more elegant and elevated package naturally flowed.

Competition Judge, Curtis Mann said, “Anyone who is familiar with Chehalem knows that their wines are excellent examples of quality Oregon Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. However, their original label had lots of color, making it look like an entry level Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir. The new label has a distinct market, classic look and clear, forward messaging, making it look like an upscale choice in the category.”

About Chehalem Winery

You learn a lot about Pinot Noir as a pioneering producer. This invaluable experience allows us to make classic Oregon wine – wine we’re proud to share. Known for our single-vineyard Pinot Noirs and a progressive approach to white wines, we farm three unique estate vineyards planted in three distinct winegrowing regions in the Willamette Valley AVA. A staple of the Downtown Newberg wine scene, our Tasting Room is open seven days a week. Old school winemaking, Oregon style! Chehalem Winery is an autonomous brand within the Stoller Wine Group portfolio. For more information, visit www.chehalemwines.com



About CF Napa Brand Design


Based in Napa Valley, California for over 45 years, CF Napa is one of the worldwide leaders in alcohol beverage branding. Our 100% specialization within the category has made us experts. CF Napa has created hundreds of brands and restaged hundreds more with incredible success by maximizing the brand’s strategic positioning. Our solutions utilize strategies that leverage current marketplace opportunities and increasingly sophisticated consumer segments. For more information, visit https://cfnapa.com/

About the Packaging Design Awards

The sixth annual Wines & Vines Packaging Conference concluded with a ceremony to announce and honor the winners of this year’s Wines & Vines Packaging Design Awards. Winners are announced in the categories of best classic format, best luxury design, best alternative format, best series, best redesign and best in show winner. The top 50 entries from the contest are on site during the conference where attendees review and vote for the “people’s choice” winner. For more information, visit https://www.wvpack.com/

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09 Aug

Yountville, Calif.—Brewer Clifton, a Jackson Family Wines brand, won the gold medal for best classic wine packaging and was also named Best in Show for its EX Post Facto 2016 Syrah during the 2019 packaging conference.

According to the winery, the Ex Post Facto 2016 Syrah packaging was produced with the intention of creating something “distinctly different with a retroactive effect or force.” The direction for the design, provided Brewer Clifton winemaker, Greg Brewer, was to use a typewriter font. Taking it a step further, designer Heather DeLong decided to use vintage typewriter keys.

“The Ex Post Facto conjured up ideas of prohibition and the era surrounding that time. Using the vintage typewriter was a way to invoke a sense of time,” DeLong said. “By adding the emboss on foil, I was able to achieve a realistic looking label. Taking a minimalistic cue from the front label, the back-label mimics someone just simply typing on a sheet of paper.”

Indeed, it was the label’s clean, simplistic design that caught the attention of the competition judges:

“Clean, minimalist design, quality bottle, and the foil fits seamlessly. This gives the buyer a sense of high-level professionalism in winemaking and wine quality.” —Barbara Gelfand Summer, former designer of Wines & Vines magazine and who helped launch the competition in 2013.


“It was clean and simple, but it was also different, that was what attracted me to it.” —Liz Thach, a professor at Sonoma State University Wine Business Institute.

“Sometimes wines that have very little front label presence actually stick out on the shelf. By creating this sense of mystery, the winery has drawn the customer in to learn more.” —Curtis Mann, , wine buyer for Raley’s.

Alternative, luxury, redesign and series design Gold Medalists

Judged by a panel of experts in the wine, retail and media trades, the Packaging Design Awards is a traditional component to the annual wine packaging conference that was first organized and produced by Wines & Vines magazine. This year, the conference drew 119 entrants to the competition. Besides the classic and best in show categories, the contest also asses the best in luxury, redesign, series and alternative package design.

Alternative Design

Bandit Wines Tetra Pak by Trinchero Family Estates

According to the winery, Bandit was the first traditional wine nationally available in Tetra Pak available in the US, when it launched 2003. Since the 2017 redesign, sales have grown double digits in total retail.

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“I just love the level of detailed information covering the Tetra Pak. And the image evokes the lifestyle the package is made for.” —competition judge, Sarah Schneider.

Luxury Design

AXR Napa Valley

According to Kilee Lockwood, manager of AXR Napa Valley, the modern design is intended to juxtapose “old Napa” with the future of winemaking. “Our goal is to take our guests on a journey through the past, present and future of the Napa Valley,” she said.

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“It takes time and money to etch a bottle. It says…there’s attention to detail and tells the customer that it costs more. The dark bottle makes the wine look elegant. It reminds me of a black sports car or limousine. —competition judge, Liz Thach.

Redesign

Chehalem Winery

The new look for Chehalem Winery is a nod to the estate’s 30-year tenure. “When you’ve been making Oregon Pinot Noir as long as we have, you embrace label evolution,” said president Gray Mortensen. The new label was created to pay homage to both the winery name and the namesake AVA: the crest represents “valley of flowers,” the native translation of the word Chehalem.

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“Anyone who is familiar with Chehalem knows that their wines are excellent examples of quality Oregon Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. However, their original label had lots of color, making it look like a entry level Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir. The new label has a distinct market, classic look and clear, forward messaging, making it look like an upscale choice in the category.” —competition judge, Curtis Mann.

Series Design

Dry Creek Vineyard, Terroir series

“Our Site Specific Terroir Series is the culmination of nearly 50 years spent working with different vineyard sites within the Dry Creek Valley,” said Dry Creek Vineyard marketing coordinator Amber Duval. She noted that the decision to highlight individual vineyard sites and intricacies of the valley with the hand-drawn art was intended to parallel the sustainable grapegrowing and winemaking practices Dry Creek practices. “This particular series was created primarily with our wine club members in mind, as well as any guests who come to visit the Dry Creek Vineyard tasting room,” Duval added. “From our location in the heart of Dry Creek Valley, guests can see and experience the undulating nature of the topography while tasting wines from those specific micro-districts.”

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“From the topographical map on the front label to the information packed on the back, this one sets the bar for informing the consumer while offering a handsome package.” — competition judge, Sarah Schneider.

About Wines & Vines Packaging Conference

The sixth annual Wines & Vines Packaging Conference took place August 8, 2019, at Lincoln Theater in Yountville, California. The conference sessions, exhibits and amenities are designed for winemakers, winery operations managers, purchasing managers, wine marketers and other industry professionals. This is the essential meeting day for every winery that wants to improve its packaging look and performance.

The packaging conference is now part of WBM Events, which also produces Innovation + Quality, WiVi Central Coast and the upcoming Wine Industry Technology Symposium and Wine Industry Financial Symposium, which take place Oct. 1-2 at Copia in Napa, Calif.

To learn more about the event, please visit wvpack.com.

About the Packaging Design Awards

The full day conference concludes with a ceremony to announce and honor the winners of this year’s Wines & Vines Packaging Design Awards. Winners are announced in the categories of best classic format, best luxury design, best alternative format, best series, best redesign and best in show winner. The top 50 entries from the contest are on site during the conference where attendees review and vote for the “people’s choice” winner.

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09 Jul

Anika Walia, a dental intern from Middlesex, has made it through to the Grand Final of the Miss England competition.

The two-day final will take place on the 31 July and 1 August in Newcastle.

Anika made it through after receiving the most public votes in the semi finals stage.

‘If I have the opportunity to win the title of Miss England,’ Ms Walia explained.

‘It will provide me with a platform to advocate for causes I truly believe in and be a voice for the voiceless.

‘Through my “Beauty With A Purpose” project, I make it my mission to empower others to achieve equality and the right to live with dignity and self-esteem.

‘If any readers would like to contribute towards my charitable cause, they can do this by donating on: www.justgiving.com/fundraising/anika-walia.

‘I am also taking my dental studies further to become an oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

‘I hope to provide free cleft palate and cleft lip treatment, especially in rural areas of the world.’

Finalists

The winner of Miss England will go on to represent England at the Miss World competition.

They could also go on to win a luxury holiday to Mauritius and a wardrobe of dresses to take to Miss World.

To see of the Miss England finalists visit www.missengland.info/qualifiers/finals.

‘The competition is much more than a physical beauty contest,’ Miss England national director, Angie Beasley, said.

‘The girls are encouraged to be charitable, sporty and an all round good role model.’

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01 Jul
Paul Bianchi and his wife, artist Wendy Armstrong, pay tribute to Spain with their Amelia Wynn Winery 2016 Aragon Red Wine, a Grenache-driven wine that won best of show at the 2019 Washington State Wine Competition. (Photo by Arty Grice Photography)

GRANDVIEW, Wash. – A year ago, self-taught winemaker Paul Bianchi earned best-of-class awards at the storied Washington State Wine Competition for his Cabernet Franc and Tempranillo.

Last week, the vintner at tiny Amelia Wynn Winery on Bainbridge Island went above and beyond by earning best of show at the statewide competition for his 2016 Aragon Red Wine, a stylish bottling of Grenache from Washington’s Horse Heaven Hills.

“This is huge for me,” Bianchi told Great Northwest Wine. “This shows that any small producer like myself, if you work hard and pay attention to detail – especially during fermentation – you can succeed.”

Total production tops out at around 1,000 cases for Bianchi, a residential general contractor who in 2008 launched Amelia Wynn, naming the winery after his fraternal twin grandchildren. Aragon serves as Bianchi’s tip of the cap to the northeast region of Spain that some view as the birthplace of Garnacha – aka Grenache.

“It’s an odd thing to do if you translate it from Spanish because it would be like calling a wine ‘Washington,’ ” Bianchi chuckled. “It was a woman on the island, a wine club member, who came up with that name as part of a contest, and we liked the sound of it and paying homage to the source of Garnacha Tinta.”

The 2016 Aragon edged past the Thurston Wolfe 2018 Albarino by a single vote to capture best-of-show honors. Prosser’s Wade Wolfe, one of Washington’s most knowledgeable and talented producers, used the Spanish grape Albariño from Crawford Vineyard in the Yakima Valley to come up with the best white wine of the Washington State Wine Competition.

Schools shine at Washington State Wine Competition

The Walter Clore Wine and Culinary Center in Prosser, Wash., offers student-made wines in the brands of Northwest Wine Academy (South Seattle Community College), College Cellars (Walla Walla CC), Yakima Valley Vintners (Yakima Valley CC) and Washington State University’s Blended Learning Program. (Photo by April Reddout)

The 36th Washington State Wine Competition was staged Friday, June 21 on the Grandview campus of Yakima Valley College in the heart of Washington wine country. From 1980 through 2015, the judging was held in conjunction with the Central Washington State Fair in Yakima. 

Starting in 2017, the judging is owned and operated by Great Northwest Wine, a media company based in Richland, Wash, and the competition also serves as a fundraiser for the next generation of Washington winemakers, as proceeds from the judging create a scholarship at Yakima Valley College’s winemaking program. This year’s 342 entries are the most for the Washington State Wine Competition since Great Northwest Wine took over the judging.

College Cellars, the winemaking program for Walla Walla Community College, earned a spot in the sweepstakes after its nonvintage Ciel du Cheval Vineyard Tawny-Style Barbera Dessert Wine won a double gold and the award for best sweet wine. The school also earned a gold medal for its 2018 Chardonnay.

Victor Palencia, a 2005 graduate of Walla Walla CC’s Institute of Enology and Viticulture, produced the judging’s best rosé – the Jones of Washington 2018 Rosé of Syrah. 

Yakima Valley Vintners, the winemaking program for Yakima Valley College, used instructor Brad Smith’s winning co-fermentation of Syrah with Lemberger from historic Kiona Vineyard en route to a gold medal for the 2016 A Sylem Red Wine ($18).

Both Yakima Valley Vintners and College Cellars operate and staff on-campus tasting rooms for their program’s award-winning wines.

Maryhill Winery strings together 9 golds, 2 BOCs

Maryhill Winery winemaker Richard Batchelor, who won the 2019 INDY International Wine Competition’s Winemaker of the Year for the third time, produced nine gold medals at the Washington State Wine Competition. (Photo courtesy of Maryhill Winery)

Maryhill Winery dominated the Washington State Wine Competition by amassing nine gold medals, led by a double gold and best of class for Richard Batchelor’s 2017 Viognier and a best of class for the 2016 Merlot from Les Collines Vineyard in the Walla Walla Valley. The work with the $19 Viognier is particularly impressive considering that at 6,000 cases it is the Pacific Northwest’s largest bottling of the white Rhône variety.

In May, Batchelor became the three-time winner of the INDY International Wine Competition’s Winemaker of the Year Award, a judging staged on the campus of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. He followed that up in Grandview with gold for his work with Barbera, Chardonnay, Mourvèdre, the Super Tuscan-inspired Tavolo Rosso, two expressions of Syrah from the 2016 vintage and the Pinot Gris-based Winemaker’s White, a wine available at many restaurants by the glass.

Pixy dust found in Crawford Vineyard 

Wade Wolfe of Thurston WolfeWade Wolfe of Thurston Wolfe
Wade Wolfe, owner/winemaker at Thurston Wolfe in Prosser, shows his purple hands during the Washington wine grape harvest. (Photo by Andy Perdue/Great Northwest Wine)

Thurston Wolfe and the 2018 Albariño ($18) provided the latest sign that there’s pixy dust connected to that variety and Crawford Vineyard in the Yakima Valley. A year ago in Grandview, Bianchi turned the Amelia Wynn 2017 Crawford Vineyard Albariño into a gold medal.

Additionally, Charlie and Connie Crawford’s 160-acre site, a longtime source of award-winning Viognier for Alexandria Nicole Cellars, continues to provide the Pinot Gris foundation for Thurston Wolfe’s bright and seafood-friendly 2018 PGV Pinot Gris-Viognier. At 3,100 cases, the $15 bottle has become the flagship white wine for Wolfe and his wife, Becky Yeaman, who have increased production of this low-alcohol charmer by nearly 50 percent since 2016. This year, it received a double gold as well as best of class and also has earned its way onto many restaurant wine lists, particularly those featuring seafood or Mexican fare.

Thurston Wolfe had four wines that merited a gold medal or better at the judging. The biochemist and plant geneticist from the University of California-Davis also received praise for a pair of affordable and approachable 2017 red table wines as the Zinfandel-based Dr. Wolfe’s Family Red grabbed a double gold and the JTW’s Blend, built with a foundation of Cabernet Sauvignon, achieved gold.

Upchurch influence shows in golden Cabs

Founding winemaker Chris Upchurch, DeLille Cellars CEO Tom Dugan and co-founders Jay Soloff and Greg Lill combined to help raise more than $180,000 for the 2018 Auction of Washington Wines. (Photo courtesy of Bacchus Capital Management)

Chris Upchurch’s artistic thumbprints spread throughout the 2019 Washington State Wine Competition. The founding winemaker for DeLille Cellars emerged with the best-of-class award for his family’s Upchurch Vineyard 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon ($75) as well as the 2017 Cab from their vibrant young LTL tier ($30). Both are produced from estate vines along the southern edge of Red Mountain.

DeLille Cellars, who recently promoted Upchurch protege Jason Gorski into the head winemaking position, scored golds for its 2016 Four Flags Cabernet Sauvignon and its Malbec-based 2016 Quintessence Red Wine.

Fittingly, there were a total of seven gold medals in the Cabernet Sauvignon category, and five-year-old Armstrong Family Winery – with tasting rooms in Woodinville and now Walla Walla – received the lone double gold for Tim Armstrong’s 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon.

Westport Winery used the Washington State Wine Competition to help christen its new MV tier – a series of single barrels from premier vineyards – and the 2017 Endeavor Cabernet Sauvignon from Elephant Mountain in the Rattlesnake Hills brought a gold medal home to the Grays Harbor County destination winery.

Palencia continues to prove his talents

Victor Palencia stands in Two Gun Vineyard, an estate planting for Jones of Washington in the Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley near Quincy, Wash. (Photo by Eric Degerman/Great Northwest Wine)

Once again, Latin wunderkind Victor Palencia’s winemaking achieved greatness in the minds of Northwest wine professionals. For the Jones of Washington family in the Columbia Basin, he turned the 2018 Rosé of Syrah from the Ancient Lakes into a sweepstakes winner and the 2015 Carménère off the Wahluke Slope also emerged as best of class. His Midas touch also accounted for gold medals with 2017 Sauvignon Blanc and 2017 Viognier. And the 2018 Sauvignon Blanc under his own Palencia brand earned a gold medal.

Earlier this year, Wine Press Northwest selected Palencia Wine Co., as its 2019 Pacific Northwest Winery of the Year.

This spring, the Jones of Washington 2017 Reserve Chardonnay was best white wine at the Cascadia International Wine Competition, the largest judging of its kind staged in the Northwest.

Ste. Michelle turns heads with Eroica, bargain Syrah 

Eroica RieslingEroica Riesling
Ernst Loosen, left, and Bob Bertheau, stand atop Snipes Mountain in the middle of the Yakima Valley. The pair work together to craft Eroica Riesling each year. (Photo by Andy Perdue/Great Northwest Wine)

One of the competition’s top bargains again emerged from the massive cellar at Columbia Crest, where the 2017 Grand Estates Syrah was chosen as the best Syrah, a remarkable achievement for a $12 wine.

Its parent, Ste. Michelle Wine Estates, the Pacific Northwest’s largest wine company, showed itself across a spectrum of styles and price points. The state’s hottest brand, 14 Hands, popped up with a gold medal for its nonvintage rosé, which was poured for judges out of a 375-milliliter can that retails for $5.99. Production of its initial large-scale canned rosé stood 23,000. 

The sommelier charmer that is the 2017 Eroica Riesling, a two-decade long collaborative effort by German leader Ernst Loosen and Chateau Ste. Michelle’s Bob Bertheau, predictably earned a gold medal. Seven Falls Winery, the pet project from the Wahluke Slope sparked by recently retired Doug Gore, delivered a gold for its 2016 Rapids Red, a Syrah-focused blend.

Hamilton Cellars, Stillwater Creek stand tall

Hamilton Cellars is moving to Red Mountain in Washington state. The wines are made by Charlie Hoppes.Hamilton Cellars is moving to Red Mountain in Washington state. The wines are made by Charlie Hoppes.
Russ and Stacie Hamilton work with winemaker Charlie Hoppes on the Hamilton Cellars lineup, which is poured on Red Mountain. (Photo courtesy of Hamilton Cellars)

Charlie “Wine Boss” Hoppes produced a pair of golds from small lots for Hamilton Cellars on Red Mountain, using a 2015 Cabernet Franc from Weinbau Vineyard on the Wahluke Slope to win a best-of-class award in addition to the Malbec-led 2015 Bona Vita.

Walla Walla’s Chuck Reininger shined with gold medals under each of his brands. He fascinated judges for his Carménère-based CPR Fourth Edition Red Wine and again under his Helix label with a 2016 Sangiovese off sweeping Stillwater Creek Vineyard.

The judging helped cast a spotlight on Tom Alberg’s Stillwater Creek Vineyard, which also bore fruit that led to gold medals for the Pondera Winery 2016 Stillwater Creek Vineyard GSM, Pullman winemaker Patrick Merry for the 2016 Petit Verdot and 2016 Malbec, as well as Alberg’s own Novelty Hill 2017 Stillwater Creek Vineyard Roussanne, crafted by Hoppes’ longtime friend Mike Januik. 

  • Multi-generation Airfield Estates in Prosser doesn’t go beyond its 830-acre vineyard in the Yakima Valley for its fruit, and the Miller family gave assistant winemaker Travis Maple credit for its 2018 Sauvignon Blanc and 2017 Chardonnay – both of which won best of class. Judges also hung a gold on the Washington State University grad’s 2018 Sangiovese Rosé.
  • Nine Hats, sister label for famed Long Shadows Vintners and Gilles Nicault in Walla Walla, continues to glitter in gold with its trendsetting Pinot Gris rosé inside the tony Julia’s Dazzle bottle. It’s also no surprise vineyards that factor into Long Shadows’s Super Tuscan Saggi program led to a best-of-class award for the Nine Hats 2016 Sangiovese.
  • Bob Bullock backed up the gold medal he won at the 2019 San Francisco Chronicle for his Eye of the Needle Winery NV Bellisimo Diavolo, a red wine created with Italian varieties, with best-of-class praise at the Washington State Wine Competition.
  • Spokane attorney Tim Nodland used the Washington State Wine Competition to showcase his small-lot program focused on Walla Walla Valley fruit with best-of-class for the Merlot-based Bad Attitude Red Wine and gold for his reserve Cab.
  • Bordeaux-inspired Davenport Cellars saw both its Left Bank- and Right Bank-styles from the 2014 vintage take gold with its Continuity and R.H.D. red wines.

Puget Sound producers state their case

Matt Albee of Eleven Winery on Bainbridge IslandMatt Albee of Eleven Winery on Bainbridge Island
Matt Albee is the owner and winemaker of Eleven Winery on Bainbridge Island. (Photo courtesy of Tami Meader)

Bianchi’s stellar Grenache was not the only star that was bottled on Bainbridge Island. 

Matt Albee of Eleven Winery saw his program emerge from the Washington State Wine Competition with four gold medals in various styles – the 2017 Cabernet Sauvignon, Cab-based 2017 La Ronde, fresh 2018 Chenin Blanc and 2018 The Prodigy Mourvèdre. A year ago in Grandview, Albee won four gold medals for Eleven Winery. In 2017, his 2015 Malbec was the best red wine of the judging.

Also in the Puget Sound, Spoiled Dog Winery and winemaker Karen Krug, who received a Platinum Award from Wine Press Northwest magazine for work on Whidbey Island with estate Pinot Noir, continue to show their mettle with cool-climate varieties in the Puget Sound by earning a gold medal for the 2016 Estate Reserve Pinot Noir. 

Chuck Jackson, who established Skagit Crest Vineyard & Winery near Sedro Woolley after his involvement with the Boeing Wine Club, struck gold with 2017 Sauvignon Blanc from the Puget Sound growing region.

Tsillan Cellars proves Lake Chelan versatility

Ray Sandidge took over as winemaker at Tsillan Cellars in 2017. (Photo by Richard Duval Images)

Dr. Bob Jankelson’s showpiece Tsillan Cellars added more evidence of the versatility of the Lake Chelan American Viticultural Area with a pair of gold medals for estate wines, the 2016 Estate Reserve Malbec and the 2018 Estate Pinot Grigio. Both wines also serve as examples of the seemingly seamless transition in 2017 from Shane Collins to Ray Sandidge.

  • Grower-vintner-lawyer Paul Beveridge at wide-ranging Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery in the Naches Heights west of Yakima produced a pair of gold medals for red varieties not often seen in Washington state. A best-of-class award went to the 2016 Conley Vineyard Tempranillo, a basalt-based and certified-organic site owned by Pat and Polly Conley that’s 10 miles south of the Naches Heights AVA. It’s managed by Beveridge’s viticulturist Abraham Gonzalez, whose farming also led to a gold for the Wilridge Estate Nebbiolo.
  • Cave B Estate Winery pulled in a pair of gold medals for white wines, the 2018 Roussanne and 2018 Cuvée Blanc, a Sauvignon Blanc-led blend.
  • Brad Sherman of Michael Florentino Cellars in Woodinville and Seattle continues to make a name for himself with Rhône varieties under his young eponymous brand, prompting judges to award a double gold medal to his 2018 Marsanne. There was also a gold for the Michael Florentino Cellars 2018 Albariño.
  • Balboa Winery commanded the judges’ attention for its precise work with Grüner Veltliner from 2018 by Tom Glase and Tyler Grennan, bringing a gold medal back to their winery in Walla Walla with its fourth year of working with Bloxom Slope Vineyard near Moxee.

Subtle changes in store at Amelia Wynn

Amelia Wynn is on Bainbridge Island, west of Seattle.Amelia Wynn is on Bainbridge Island, west of Seattle.
Paul Bianchi is the owner and winemaker for Amelia Wynn Winery on Bainbridge Island, Wash. The winery is named after his fraternal twin grandchildren. (Photo by Andy Perdue/Great Northwest Wine)

Early in his winemaking career, Bianchi leaned on Cheryl Barber-Jones for advice. Recently,  his appreciation for the masterful blending by Brian Carter has been a driving force for several of his wines. 

Bianchi continues to name the wine “Aragon” because the percentage of Grenache changes. In 2014, it could have been labeled as a G-S-M with the roles of Syrah and Mourvèdre. The 2016 vintage could have been labeled “Grenache,” and it was entered and judged as such.

 “I like Grenache, and you have to like Grenache because it’s not easy to work with,” Bianchi said. “I get it from Six Prong, which was planted in the Horse Heaven Hills by Dr. Steven Elerding. It was originally 80 acres, and it was kind of a winemaker’s vineyard – with a lot of interesting varietals. Al Fountain is the owner of Six Prong, and it’s managed by Marshall Edwards, who also manages vineyards on Red Mountain.”

Bianchi is in the middle of a short relocation of the Amelia Wynn tasting room. It lines up with his scaling back on the different styles and varieties of wine he’s producing. He plans to focus on four red wines, a rosé and a white, which will mean less driving across the state during harvest. Along the way, however, he created a 2017 Pinot Noir from Oregon’s Eola-Amity Hills. 

“I’m moving the tasting room to 390 Winslow Way East, about 300 feet away, into a larger space,” Bianchi said. “We will have full-food service and call it Amelia Wynn Winery Café. It will be wine-centric, and I wanted a full kitchen, so we’ll be expanding the menu to emphasize wine and food pairing.”

It’s a construction project that he’s overseeing, and one he hopes to have completed by early August. When that’s open, and the transition will leave his wife, third-generation artist Wendy Armstrong, with an art gallery in the former tasting room space. The couple has been on Bainbridge Island long enough to believe that their community can support both businesses.

“I’ve lived and worked here for 41 years,” Bianchi said. “I’ve definitely seen it grow and change. The population was at 10,500 when I moved here in 1978. It’s about 28,000 now. And fortunately, almost 100 percent of my construction work has been on the island over the years.”

2019 Washington State Wine Competition results

Best of show
Amelia Wynn Winery 2016 Aragon Red Wine, Horse Heaven Hills $40.00
Best white wine
Thurston Wolfe 2018 Albariño, Yakima Valley $18.00
Best rosé
Jones of Washington 2018 Rosé of Syrah, Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley $13.99
Best sweet wine
College Cellars NV Ciel du Cheval Vineyard Tawny Style Barbera Dessert Wine, Red Mountain $40.00
Best of class/double gold medal
Maryhill Winery 2017 Viognier, Columbia Valley $19.00
Northwest Cellars 2015 Petit Verdot, Red Mountain $48.00
Best of class/gold medal
Airfield Estates 2017 Chardonnay, Yakima Valley $15.00
Airfield Estates 2018 Sauvignon Blanc, Yakima Valley $15.00
Columbia Crest 2017 Grand Estates Syrah, Columbia Valley $12.00
Eye of the Needle Winery NV Bellisimo Diavolo, Walla Walla Valley $55.00
Hamilton Cellars 2015 Weinbau Cabernet Franc, Columbia Valley $35.00
Jones of Washington 2015 Carménère, Wahluke Slope $30.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Les Collines Merlot, Wahluke Slope $38.00
Nine Hats 2016 Sangiovese, Columbia Valley $25.00
Nodland Cellars 2016 Bad Attitude, Walla Walla Valley $35.00
Thurston Wolfe 2018 PGV Pinot Gris-Viognier, Columbia Valley $15.00
Upchurch Vineyard 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon, Red Mountain $75.00
Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery 2016 Conley Vineyard Tempranillo, Columbia Valley $25.00
Double gold medal
Armstrong Family Winery 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon, Walla Walla Valley $48.00
Sherman Winery 2018 Marsanne, Yakima valley $26.00
Thurston Wolfe 2017 Dr Wolfe’s Family Red, Horse Heaven Hills $18.00
Gold medal
14 Hands NV Rosé (Can), Washington State $5.99
Airfield Estates 2018 Sangiovese Rosé, Yakima Valley $16.00
Balboa Winery 2018 Grüner Veltliner, Columbia Valley $28.00
Cascade Cliffs Vineyard & Winery 2017 Petite Sirah, Wahluke Slope $60.00
Cave B Estate Winery 2018 Cave B Vineyards Roussanne, Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley $27.00
Cave B Estate Winery 2018 Cuvée Blanc, Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley $25.00
Chateau Ste. Michelle & Dr. Loosen 2017 Eroica Riesling, Columbia Valley $20.00
College Cellars 2018 Chardonnay, Walla Walla Valley $20.00
Coyote Canyon Winery 2016 Tempranillo, Horse Heaven Hills $26.00
Davenport Cellars 2014 Contunuity, Columbia Valley $30.00
Davenport Cellars 2014 R.H.D., Columbia Valley $28.00
DeLille Cellars 2016 Four Flags, Red Mountain $66.00
DeLille Cellars 2016 Quintessence, Red Mountain $54.00
Eleven Winery 2017 Cabernet Sauvignon, Red Mountain $55.00
Eleven Winery 2017 La Ronde, Washington $38.00
Eleven Winery 2018 Chenin Blanc, Yakima Valley $20.00
Eleven Winery 2018 Mourvèdre – The Prodigy, Washington $26.00
Genoa Cellars 2015 Ketch, Red Mountain $42.00
Hamilton Cellars. 2015 Bona Vita , Columbia Valley $32.00
Helix by REININGER 2016 Stillwater Creek Vineyard Sangiovese, Columbia Valley $25.00
Jones of Washington 2017 Sauvignon Blanc, Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley $14.99
Jones of Washington 2017 Viognier, Wahluke Slope $14.99
Kiona Vineyards and Winery 2018 Estate Chenin Blanc Ice Wine, Red Mountain $50.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 McKinley Springs Mourvèdre, Horse Heaven Hills $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Barbera, Columbia Valley $42.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Syrah, Columbia Valley $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Tavolo Rosso, Columbia Valley $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Syrah, Columbia Valley $27.00
Maryhill Winery 2017 Chardonnay, Columbia Valley $17.00
Maryhill Winery 2017 Winemaker’s White, Columbia Valley $16.00
Merry Cellars 2016 Malbec, Walla Walla Valley $50.00
Merry Cellars 2016 Petit Verdot, Columbia Valley $38.00
Michael Florentino Cellars 2018 Albariño , Yakima Valley $22.00
Nine Hats 2016 Sangiovese, Columbia Valley $25.00
Nine Hats 2018 Julia’s Dazzle Rosé, Columbia Valley $18.00
Nodland Cellars 2015 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Walla Walla Valley $45.00
Northwest Cellars 2015 Carménère, Red Mountain $48.00
Novelty Hill 2017 Stillwater Creek Vineyard Roussanne, Columbia Valley $23.00
Palencia Wine Co. 2018 Sauvignon Blanc, Columbia Valley $18.00
Pondera Winery 2016 Stillwater Creek Vineyard GSM, Columbia Valley $42.00
REININGER Winery NV CPR Chuck P. Reininger Fourth Edition Red Wine, Columbia Valley $90.00
Seven Falls Cellars 2016 Rapids Red, Wahluke Slope $18.00
Skagit Crest Vineyard & Winery 2017 Sauvignon Blanc, Puget Sound $18.00
Spoiled Dog Winery 2016 Estate Reserve Pinot Noir, Puget Sound $38.00
Thurston Wolfe 2017 JTW’s Blend, Horse Heaven Hills $18.00
Tsillan Cellars 2016 Estate Reserve Malbec, Lake Chelan $42.00
Tsillan Cellars 2018 Estate Pinot Grigio, Lake Chelan $28.00
Upchurch Vineyard 2017 LTL Cabernet Sauvignon, Red Mountain $30.00
Westport Winery 2017 MV Endeavor Cabernet Sauvignon, Rattlesnake Hills $49.00
Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery 2016 Wilridge Vineyard Estate Nebbiolo, Naches Heights $35.00
Yakima Valley Vintners 2016 A Sylem Red Wine, Columbia Valley $18.00
Silver medal
Airfield Estates 2015 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Yakima Valley $30.00
Airfield Estates 2015 Reserve Merlot, Yakima Valley $30.00
Airfield Estates 2016 Airfield Red Blend, Yakima Valley $18.00
Airfield Estates 2016 Mustang, Yakima Valley $30.00
Airfield Estates 2018 Moscato, Yakima Valley $15.00
Armstrong Family Winery 2016 Malbec, Columbia Valley $34.00
Armstrong Family Winery 2016 Merlot, Walla Walla Valley $44.00
Armstrong Family Winery 2016 Petit Verdot, Columbia Valley $42.00
Armstrong Family Winery 2016 The Scotsman Syrah, Columbia Valley $42.00
Bainbridge Vineyards 2016 Pinot Noir, Puget Sound $36.00
Balboa Winery 2014 Mith, Walla Walla Valley $55.00
Balboa Winery 2015 Pandemonium, Walla Walla Valley $60.00
Bayernmoor Cellars 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon, Horse Heaven Hills $39.00
Cascade Cliffs Vineyard & Winery 2017 Blood Red Barbera, Columbia Valley $75.00
Cave B Estate Winery 2016 Tempranillo, Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley $33.00
Cave B Estate Winery 2018 Cave B Vineyards Chenin Blanc, Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley $22.00
Cave B Estate Winery 2018 Unoaked Chardonnay , Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley $19.00
College Cellars 2018 Rosé of Pinot Gris , Yakima Valley $18.00
College Cellars 2018 Sauvgnon Blanc, Walla Walla Valley $18.00
College Cellars 2018 Sèmillon, Walla Walla Valley $18.00
College Cellars 2017 Barbera, Walla Walla Valley $20.00
College Cellars 2017 Cabernet Franc, Walla Walla Valley $25.00
College Cellars 2017 Petit Verdot, Walla Walla Valley $30.00
Coyote Canyon Winery 2014 Graciano, Horse Heaven Hills $26.00
Coyote Canyon Winery 2014 H/H Estates Big John Cabernet Sauvignon, Horse Heaven Hills $42.00
Coyote Canyon Winery 2014 H/H Estates Bozak, Horse Heaven Hills $42.00
Coyote Canyon Winery 2014 Tres Cruces Red Blend, Horse Heaven Hills $24.00
Coyote Canyon Winery 2015 Michael Andrews Spanish Red Blend, Horse Heaven Hills $32.00
Coyote Canyon Winery 2016 Primitivo, Horse Heaven Hills $26.00
Coyote Canyon Winery 2018 Concrete Fermented Albariño, Horse Heaven Hills $28.00
Davenport Cellars 2008 Continuity, Columbia Valley $30.00
Davenport Cellars 2012 Continuity, Columbia Valley $30.00
Davenport Cellars 2012 R.H.D., Columbia Valley $28.00
Davenport Cellars 2013 R.H.D., Columbia Valley $28.00
Davenport Cellars 2013 Continuity, Columbia Valley $30.00
Davenport Cellars 2013 Merlot, Columbia Valley $30.00
Davenport Cellars 2015 Patch, Columbia Valley $0.00
Eleven Winery 2017 Elephant Mountain Vineyard Syrah, Yakima Valley $26.00
Eleven Winery 2017 Malbec, Yakima Valley $41.00
Eleven Winery 2018 La Primavera, Washington $22.00
Eleven Winery 2018 Pinot Grigio, Yakima Valley $17.00
Eleven Winery 2018 Roussanne, Yakima Valley $24.00
Eleven Winery 2018 Sugarloaf Vineyard Viognier, Yakima Valley $24.00
Eye of the Needle Winery 2015 Cabernet Franc, Columbia Valley $35.00
Eye of the Needle Winery 2018 Chenin Blanc, Columbia Valley $20.00
Eye of the Needle Winery NV 10th Anniversary, Walla Walla Valley $70.00
Farmhand Winery 2016 Go 4 Red, Columbia Valley $32.00
Farmhand Winery 2016 Malbec, Columbia Valley $32.00
Fletcher Bay Winery 2017 Pirate Red, Columbia Valley $34.00
Fletcher Bay Winery 2017 Sangiovese, Yakima Valley $37.00
Genoa Cellars 2015 Traveler Sangiovese, Red Mountain $33.00
Genoa Cellars 2017 Tell-Tale White Blend, Columbia Valley $22.00
Hamilton Cellars 2015 Red Mountain Malbec, Red Mountain $44.00
Harbinger Winery 2017 Viognier, Rattlesnake Hills $25.00
Harbinger Winery 2018 Albariño, Yakima Valley $22.00
Kiona Vineyards and Winery 2018 Chenin Blanc, Columbia Valley $15.00
Lagana Cellars 2016 Walla Walla Valley Syrah, Walla Walla Valley $32.00
Lagana Cellars 2018 Breezy Slope Vineyard Pinot Noir Rosé, Walla Walla Valley $20.00
Longship Cellars 2016 Reserve Tempranillo, Columbia Valley $65.00
Longship Cellars 2017 Bandito Garnacha, Wahluke Slope $36.00
Longship Cellars 2017 Invader Tempranillo, Columbia Valley $36.00
Longship Cellars 2017 Majik Merlot, Horse Heaven Hills $32.00
Longship Cellars 2017 Once is Enough Petite Sirah, Wahluke Slope $34.00
Lopez Island Vineyards 2017 Raven’s Caw Red, Columbia Valley $38.00
Lopez Island Vineyards 2018 Siegerrebe, Puget Sound $25.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Cabernet Franc, Columbia Valley $27.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $30.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Clifton Hill Cabernet Sauvignon, Wahluke Slope $42.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Eagle Ranch Cabernet Sauvignon, Red Mountain $36.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Elephant Mountain Cabernet Franc, Rattlesnake Hills $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Elephant Mountain Carménère, Rattlesnake Hills $46.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Elephant Mountain Merlot, Rattlesnake Hills $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Elephant Mountain Mourvèdre, Rattlesnake Hills $42.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Elephant Mountain Sangiovese, Rattlesnake Hills $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Kiona Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon, Red Mountain $51.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Kiona Vineyards Merlot, Red Mountain $44.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Kiona Vineyards Petite Sirah, Yakima Valley $42.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Les Collines Cabernet Sauvignon, Wahluke Slope $42.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Les Collines Syrah, Wahluke Slope $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 McKinley Springs Cinsaut, Horse Heaven Hills $42.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 McKinley Springs Petit Verdot, Horse Heaven Hills $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Merlot, Columbia Valley $21.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Northridge Vineyard Syrah, Wahluke Slope $42.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Painted Hills Tempranillo, Yakima Valley $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Cabernet Franc, Columbia Valley $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $46.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Grenache, Columbia Valley $42.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Malbec , Columbia Valley $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Merlot, Columbia Valley $36.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Rosso Granto, Columbia Valley $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Sangiovese, Columbia Valley $36.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Serendipity, Columbia Valley $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Proprietor’s Reserve Zinfandel, Columbia Valley $46.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Zinfandel, Columbia Valley $16.00
Maryhill Winery 2017 Proprietor’s Reserve Chardonnay, Columbia Valley $31.00
Maryhill Winery 2017 Winemaker’s Red, Columbia Valley $16.00
Maryhill Winery 2018 Proprietor’s Reserve Albariño, Columbia Valley $25.00
Maryhill Winery 2018 Proprietor’s Reserve Rosé, Columbia Valley $25.00
Maryhill Winery 2018 Rosé of Sangiovese, Columbia Valley $17.00
Merry Cellars 2018 Viognier, Columbia Valley $24.00
Nine Hats 2015 Malbec, Columbia Valley $25.00
Nine Hats 2017 Pinot Gris, Columbia Valley $14.00
Nine Hats 2017 Riesling, Columbia Valley $14.00
Northwest Cellars 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon, Red Mountain $36.00
Northwest Cellars 2014 Petite Sirah, Red Mountain $36.00
Northwest Cellars 2015 Carménère, Horse Heaven Hills $48.00
Palencia Wine Co. 2015 Vino la Monarcha Merlot, Columbia Valley $22.00
Palencia Wine Co. 2016 El Viñador Syrah, Wahluke Slope $50.00
Palencia Wine Co. 2016 Vino la Monarcha Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $22.00
Palencia Wine Co. 2016 Vino la Monarcha Sangiovese, Wahluke Slope $24.00
Palencia Wine Co. 2018 El Viñador Albariño, Ancient Lakes of Columbia Valley $25.00
Palouse Winery 2016 Poet Blend, Rattlesnake Hills $60.00
Palouse Winery 2016 Saint Sangiovese, Rattlesnake Hills $58.00
Pondera Winery 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $36.00
Pondera Winery 2015 SVS – Stillwater Creek Vineyard, Columbia Valley $45.00
Port Townsend Vineyards 2018 Siegerrebe, Puget Sound $20.00
Port Townsend Vineyards 2018 Viognier, Yakima Valley $23.00
Saviah Cellars 2017 The Jack Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $18.00
Saviah Cellars 2018 The Jack Red Wine, Columbia Valley $18.00
Sherman Winery 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon, Horse Heaven Hills $38.00
Sherman Winery 2016 Mourvèdre, Red mountain $38.00
Skagit Cellars 2016 Barbera, Horse Heaven Hills $36.00
Skagit Crest Vineyard & Winery 2016 Pinot Noir, Puget Sound $27.00
Skagit Crest Vineyard & Winery 2017 Chardonnay, Puget Sound $16.00
Thurston Wolfe 2017 Petite Sirah, Horse Heaven Hills $20.00
Tsillan Cellars 2016 Estate Sangiovese, Lake Chelan $30.00
Tsillan Cellars 2018 Estate Sempre Amore, Lake Chelan $28.00
Tucannon Cellars 2015 Cabernet Franc, Horse Heaven Hills $35.00
Tucannon Cellars 2015 Red Fusion, Columbia Valley $32.00
Tucannon Cellars 2015 Syrah, Horse Heaven Hills $34.00
Velen Winery 2018 Sunrise Orange Muscat/Riesling, Yakima Valley $15.00
Westport Winery 2017 MV Argonaut Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $49.00
Westport Winery 2017 MV Nomad Cabernet Sauvignon, Horse Heaven Hills $49.00
Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery 2015 Wilridge Vineyard Estate Melange Noir, Naches Heights $40.00
Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery 2016 Wilridge Vineyard Estate Sangiovese, Naches Heights $35.00
Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery 2016 Wilridge Vineyard Zweigelt, Naches Heights $35.00
Wind Rose Cellars 2014 Barbera, Yakima Valley $22.00
Yakima Valley Vintners 2016 Campus Blend Red Wine, Columbia Valley $16.00
Yakima Valley Vintners 2016 Coyote Canyon Vineyard Primitivo, Columbia Valley $18.00
Yakima Valley Vintners 2018 Coyote Canyon Vineyard Research Paper Roussanne, Columbia Valley $16.00

Bronze medal
Armstrong Family Winery 2016 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $55.00
Babick Cellars 2017 Merlot, Columbia Valley $22.00
Bayernmoor Cellars 2017 Chardonnay, Columbia Valley $29.00
Bayernmoor Cellars 2018 Rosé, Columbia Valley $15.00
College Cellars 2018 Riesling, Columbia Valley $18.00
College Cellars 2018 RVM, Walla Walla Valley $20.00
College Cellars 2015 Golden Ridge Cabernet Sauvignon, Walla Walla Valley $25.00
College Cellars 2017 Malbec, Walla Walla Valley $25.00
College Cellars 2017 Seven Hills Vineyard La Laurelia Red Wine, Walla Walla Valley $30.00
College Cellars 2017 Tempranillo, Walla Walla Valley $25.00
Eye of the Needle Winery 2016 Malbec, Columbia Valley $35.00
Eye of the Needle Winery 2018 Rosé, Red Mountain $15.00
Farmhand Winery 2018 Gruner Meadow Grüner Veltliner, Columbia Valley $21.00
Harbinger Winery 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $35.00
Harbinger Winery 2014 Malbec, Wahluke Slope $28.00
Harbinger Winery 2014 Syrah, Washington State $32.00
Kiona Vineyards and Winery 2016 Estate Red Mountain Merlot, Red Mountain $25.00
Kiona Vineyards and Winery NV Estate Red Mountain Pioneer Red Version II, Red Mountain $25.00
Lagana Cellars 2016 J&S Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon, Walla Walla Valley $36.00
Liberty Lake Wine Cellars 2017 Red Heaven Zinfandel, Red Mountain $41.00
Lopez Island Vineyards 2017 Chardonnay, Yakima Valley $18.00
Lopez Island Vineyards 2018 Rosé, Yakima Valley $20.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Elephant Mountain Marvell GSM, Rattlesnake Hills $46.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Malbec, Columbia Valley $27.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 McKinley Springs Cabernet Sauvignon, Horse Heaven Hills $46.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 McKinley Springs Syrah, Horse Heaven Hills $38.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Painted Hills Primitivo, Yakima Valley $30.00
Maryhill Winery 2016 Sangiovese, Columbia Valley $27.00
Maryhill Winery 2017 Proprietor’s Reserve Roussanne, Columbia Valley $22.00
Maryhill Winery 2018 Muscat di Canelli, Columbia Valley $17.00
Maryhill Winery 2018 Sauvignon Blanc, Columbia Valley $17.00
Maryhill Winery 2018 Sèmillon, Columbia Valley $15.00
Merry Cellars 2016 Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley $48.00
Nodland Cellars 2016 Syrah, Yakima Valley $53.00
Palouse Winery 2016 Red Satin Cabernet Sauvignon, Rattlesnake Hills $50.00
Skagit Cellars 2015 Merlot, Lake Chelan $34.00
Skagit Cellars 2015 Serendipity Syrah, Lake Chelan $65.00
Skagit Cellars 2018 Sangiovese Rosé, Columbia Valley $23.00
Skagit Cellars 2018 Viognier, Columbia Valley $23.00
Skagit Crest Vineyard & Winery 2017 Pinot Blanc, Puget Sound $20.00
Skagit Crest Vineyard & Winery 2017 Rosé of Pinot Noir, Puget Sound $16.00
Tucannon Cellars 2015 Mourvèdre, Horse Heaven Hills $40.00
Velen Winery 2013 Barbera, Yakima Valley $22.00
Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery 2015 Wilridge Vineyard Estate Red Dessert Wine Port, Naches Heights $25.00
Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery 2016 Wilridge Vineyard Estate Muscat Blanc Dessert Wine, Naches Heights $20.00
Wilridge Vineyard, Winery & Distillery 2018 Acadia Vineyard Organic Pinot Grigio, Columbia Gorge $18.00
Yakima Valley Vintners 2015 Carménère, Yakima Valley $16.00


Credit: Source link

27 Jun

Professor Hill, the first British scientist to win this award, was presented with his prize at the 25th International Glass Congress in Boston.

The Award was made by the American Ceramic Society.

An expert on fluorine containing glasses and glass-ceramics, Professor Hill initially worked on high fluorine content glasses used in steel making which lead to the development of fluorine containing bioactive glasses.

In 2009, Professor Hill moved from Imperial College to Queen Mary’s School of Medicine and Dentistry to exploit fluoride glass technology in the dental field and was a founder of Biomin Technologies Ltd in 2014.

Improving oral wellbeing

‘It is a huge honour to receive this award and I am delighted that, through Biomin, the science behind my work is being widely used to improve oral wellbeing across the world,’ commented Professor Hill.

Biomin toothpastes contain the special glasses that Professor Hill and his team developed.

These glasses dissolve slowly over 10-12 hours releasing calcium, phosphate and fluoride ions.

‘It is this slow release which is particularly beneficial compared to conventional toothpastes where the fluoride is washed away by salivary flow fairly quickly after toothbrushing,’ explained Professor Hill.

Professor Hill is currently research director for the Institute of Dentistry in London.

Speaking after the award Professor Arun Varshneya said, ‘Professor Hill’s talk was an excellent example of translating research in the laboratory into products, and is exactly what I wanted to encourage by founding this Award.’


Links

Biomin Technologies

Queen Mary University of London

American Ceramic Society

Credit: Source link

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