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19 Nov

A Simple Guide to Eating for New Trainees

by Ray Gillenwater, SSC | November 19, 2019

As a new Starting Strength trainee, one of the biggest opportunities for error outside of the gym is failing to eat in a way that optimally supports the growth of lean muscular bodymass. The most important aspect of diet for a new trainee is protein intake. Yes, overall caloric intake is critical, but learning how to eat enough protein requires the biggest change in habits for most people. Once a protein goal is met, adding calories with carbs, or removing fat calories, becomes a fairly simple day-to-day adjustment. 

To be clear, I’m not suggesting that you diet. I’m not asking you to punish yourself inside or outside of the gym. As much as the rest of the fitness industry wishes it to be true, the amount of mental anguish and novelty associated with your fitness routine and/or nutrition program has no bearing on its efficacy. Restrictive diets are for physique competitors, athletes, those that need medical intervention (the morbidly obese, type II diabetics), and your friend that just went vegan because of a documentary she saw on Netflix. Being a strength trainee is about improving the quality of your physical existence. If you demonize entire food groups or adhere to pop culture’s latest pseudo-scientific food ideology, you’re on the path to neuroticism, not an improved quality of life. 

If you legitimately need to diet due to a health issue, hire a Registered Dietitian that’s also a Starting Strength Coach. Otherwise, take this time to enjoy yourself. It is possible to love every meal you eat while achieving your training goals, along with being more capable, looking better, and improving your overall health – it’s one of the best things about doing the program. 

As a reminder: Our goal is to get stronger. Stronger means more muscle mass. Building lean muscular bodymass requires eating lots of protein, with enough calories to be in an anabolic (growth) state. How much protein do you need? I don’t know. But for the majority of trainees who are not obese, a great place to start is to eat 1g of protein per pound of target bodyweight, or current bodyweight, whichever is greater. So if you’re 6’2” and 168 lbs (like I was pre-Starting Strength), eat at least 250 g of protein per day. If you’re 5’8” and 210 lbs (untrained), eat at least 210 g of protein per day. In a unique situation? Hire a professional and don’t follow general guidelines. 

How can you possibly eat that much protein? By treating animal protein like the priority it is and centering your meals around it. For example, if you’re not a fat guy, here’s what your day might consist of: 

  • Breakfast: Four eggs, three slices of cheese, three strips of bacon, glass of milk: 69 g protein
  • Lunch: Carnitas bowl with rice and beans: 67 g protein
  • Snack: One scoop of Starting Strength whey protein with water or OJ: 24 g protein
  • Dinner: 12oz ribeye steak (the rest of the meal is irrelevant when steak is involved): 91 g protein 

Result: 250 g of protein, no hunger pangs (since protein is the most satiating of the macros), full recovery from training stress, and (hopefully) no guilt. 

gillenwater after training and some weight gaingillenwater after training and some weight gain

Yes, you’ll get protein from other food sources, like the non-steak food items you eat with dinner. That’s okay. Eating “too much” protein is less of a problem than not eating enough. If you overshoot and need to adjust down (I have had zero trainees report this as an issue), that’s an easy problem to solve. 

Don’t do anything else, at least not yet. Just hit your protein goal and make sure your coach agrees that you’re adequately recovered from your last training session next time you come into the gym. As an underweight guy, you’ll need to eat lots of carbs (white rice is easy) and plenty of fats (dressings, oils, dairy) to ensure that your total caloric needs are being met. Don’t overcomplicate this – you certainly don’t want to develop a guilt-based relationship with food. Resist the temptation to create problems where there are none. There is no need to pay attention to the latest nutrition craze on Instagram, or to your co-workers that are doing a team juice cleanse. Try this instead: Lift big, eat big, sleep great, and whenever possible, enjoy the hell out of life.


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17 Nov

You could jeopardize your overall health if you don't pay attention to the foods you eat. Consuming too much junk food, for example, can lead to chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, clogged arteries and more.

Making the decision to improve your lifestyle by following a primarily raw, plant-based diet is a health-conscious decision that improves your metabolism, boosts your immune system and promotes overall wellness and longevity while reducing your risk for chronic conditions like the ones listed above. Some of the most important healthy diet staples consist of vegetables, and that's because they're so high in nutrients and provide a multitude of benefits.

"The amount of fruits and vegetables we eat every day depends on age, gender and more."

According to Choose My Plate, an initiative by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the amount of fruits and vegetables we eat every day depends on age, gender and level of physical activity. The daily recommendations, based on these factors, range anywhere from 1 to 2 cups of fruit, and 1 to 3 cups of vegetables. They recommend filling half of your plate with fruits and vegetables at every meal. We say that is a good start, but adults should strive for at least 10 servings a day for optimal health.

But just how favorable are veggies when it comes to overall wellness? Here are five of the top benefits of eating vegetables:

1. They're an Important Source of Nutrients
When your diet consists of eating a plethora of vegetables, you're fueling your body with many of the vital nutrients it needs to thrive. According to Choose My Plate, a healthy eating initiative by the United States Department of Agriculture, vegetables are rich in potassium, fiber, folic acid, vitamins A and C and more.

2. They're Low in Calories
Vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories. This means you can fill up on a lunch of veggies without worrying about going over your suggested daily caloric intake. This makes it easier to eat hearty meals without worrying about counting calories, and can also aid weight loss and maintenance.

3. They Promote Optimal Gut Function
Fiber is beneficial to the body in the sense that it can reduce the occurrence of bowel problems, such as constipation. Due to the water and fiber content in most vegetables, these healthy foods nourish beneficial bacteria in the gut, which keeps it healthy and regular.

4. They're a Natural Mood Booster
You know that following a diet rich in vegetables is great for your physical health, but have you considered how beneficial it is for your mental well-being? According to Mental Health America, following a diet that relies on nuts, whole grains, fruits, unsaturated fats and vegetables is better for mental wellness than one that consists of meat and dairy products. Additionally, MHA said that those who follow a primarily raw, plant-based diet are 30 percent less likely to develop depression.

5. They're Great for Immunity
Since vegetables are loaded with essential nutrients, they have a great reputation for optimizing the immune system. Specifically, leafy green vegetables activate T-bet, a gene that produces immune cells in the gut, according to Dr. Mercola. Those immune cells maintain immunity and inflammation, protect the body from pathogenic bacteria, improve intestinal balance and prevent food allergies.

Beyond consuming vegetables, you may consider our Advanced Superfood product. The blend of 35 organic ingredients, including cereal grass juice powders, leafy greens, microalgae, sprouts, prebiotic fibers, sea vegetables, and other vegetables, makes this product one of the most nutritious and convenient ways to fuel your body.

The post Benefits of Eating Vegetables appeared first on Plant-Based Diet – Recipes & Weight Loss Supplements | Hallelujah Diet.

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29 Aug

Health, Nutrition, Parenting

Body Image and Eating Disorders: Not for Girls Only

Dear Mr. Dad: I’m completely convinced that my son has an eating disorder. When he was little, he was always a little on the heavy side. At about 11—right when puberty hit—he suddenly started dieting. At first, I was proud of him for taking charge of his own weight. He looked really good and seemed happier with himself. But he kept right on dieting, to the point that he began to look skinny. To make matters worse, he’s talking about wanting to lose more weight. Thinking our son might be really sick, my husband and I took him to our pediatrician, who said he was fine and told him to put on some weight. I asked whether our son could have an eating disorder, but the pediatrician just smirked. What should we do?

A: Two things: First, get yourself a new pediatrician. Of the 30 million people in the U.S. who suffer from eating disorders, about a third are male. As are about half of all those who binge eat, purge, abuse laxatives, fast, and do other extreme things to lose weight. But far too many medical professionals, including your pediatrician, are too attached to the idea that girls and women are the only ones affected.

Second, find a mental health professional who has experience treating eating disorders. As with pediatricians, many therapists have trouble acknowledging that boys and men can be affected. Finding the right mental health person will be essential if your son needs extended outpatient or inpatient treatment. Most eating disorder programs and facilities don’t accept males. That, of course, makes it harder for boys like your son to get the treatment they so desperately need.

Click here to read the rest of this article.

Author: Armin Brott

Armin Brott is the proud father of three, a former U.S. Marine, a best-selling author, radio host, speaker, and one of the country’s leading experts on fatherhood. He writes frequently about fatherhood, families, and men’s health. Read more about Armin or visit his website, mrdad.com. You can also connect via social media: Facebook.com/mrdad, @mrdad, pinterest.com/mrdad, linkedin.com/in/mrdad, plus.google.com/+mrdad.


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24 Aug

While our bodies are indeed perfectly capable of doing two things at once—sleeping and digesting, in this case—hitting the sack right after feasting is not ideal for many people because of the way the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is set up.

Between the stomach and the esophagus (the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach) is a muscular valve called the lower esophageal sphincter, according to the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Sometimes this valve remains open, allowing the contents of the stomach and digestive juices to flow back up into the esophagus and cause irritation, Scott Gabbard, M.D., a gastroenterologist at Cleveland Clinic, tells SELF. That unpleasant burning sensation (and sometimes taste) in your throat and/or chest is known as gastroesophageal reflux (i.e. acid reflux or heartburn).

Heartburn can be triggered by a few things, including eating and then lying down, according to the Mayo Clinic. In other words exactly the scenario when you eat before bed. When you lie horizontally with a full stomach “[you] lose the effect of gravity that helps to keep the contents of the stomach down,” Dr. Gabbard explains, which causes this backflow. Everyone can get heartburn once in a while, but if you have it more than twice a week you might have what’s called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Another risk of nighttime eating is dyspepsia, more commonly known as indigestion or an upset stomach. This is a set of symptoms—like stomach pain, nausea, getting uncomfortably full or full very quickly, and upper abdomen bloating or burning—that can commonly be triggered by eating quickly; overeating; eating food that is fatty, greasy, or spicy; or drinking too many caffeinated, alcoholic, or carbonated beverages, according to the NIDDK.

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22 Aug

Employees prepare orders for customers at a Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurant in Hollywood, California.

Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Recession red flags may be cropping up in the stock and bond markets as the trade war rages on. But it seems the American consumer hasn’t gotten the message — at least not yet.

This holds particularly true when it comes to spending at restaurants. Sales at eating and drinking establishments are up more than 4% this year, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, surpassing grocery sales at just 3% year-over-year growth.

The National Restaurant Association projects overall industry sales will hit a high of $863 billion in 2019, up 3.6% from last year.

Two big factors helping to bolster consumer sentiment — a strong jobs market and tax cuts.

“Generally speaking, the consumer — particularly the middle to upper middle-income consumer — is healthy. This group has benefited from stock market gains, stable asset markets, wage growth that is pretty healthy,” said R.J. Hottovy, senior restaurant analyst at Morningstar.

The compound annual growth rate for restaurant sales since 1970 is 6%, but the pace dropped to 4% in the decade since the Great Recession, according to the restaurant association. Despite that slower growth, more cash spent on food is being allocated to restaurant spending. In 1955, 25 cents of every $1 spent on food went to restaurants. Today, it’s more than half.

And while restaurant operators face many challenges, from a tight labor pool to rising wage costs, the consumer outlook for spending is strong.

“There are two important drivers for the industry from a consumer perspective — convenience and socialization,” said Hudson Riehle, the association’s senior vice president of research. “Particularly looking at quick service, which has grown much more quickly than table service. There’s a greater focus on the off-premise market including carryout, drive-through, delivery, curbside and even food trucks.”

Restaurant operators are moving quickly to erase friction for customers, helping to enhance the experience whether on or off site. Nearly every major restaurant player is either expanding its technology platform, upgrading stores or adding delivery.

“Demographics of younger restaurant patrons are dramatically different than baby boomers. Their expectation of restaurant experience basically incorporates some aspect of technology,” said Riehle. “One of the most important developments over past few years has been rapid integration of tech into delivery and ordering experience.”

Strength in consumer spending at restaurants, being supported by digital growth and delivery, can be seen in a slew of restaurants that recently reported earnings. Chipotle Mexican Grill had 10% same-stores sales growth for its second quarter, while McDonald’s posted a 5.7% jump in same-store sales and Starbucks saw sales at its cafes open at least 12 months grow 7%.

These are not hot new restaurants. They are established American brands seeing major growth, thanks in part to technological upgrades from store to mobile app, which is better at engaging customers and meeting their needs for speed and convenience.

Analysts say it’s likely to continue, even if the economy does take a leg lower. But there’s one thing that could lead to slower sales growth — a downturn in the job market.

“We’d have to see unemployment basically spike for restaurant trends to reverse,” Hottovy said. “If we are looking at a healthy job market, we can expect continued growth in restaurants.”

CNBC’s Nick Wells contributed to this story.

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13 Aug

Irritable bowel syndrome, a common disorder that impacts the large intestine, is prevalent in nearly 10 to 25 percent of the U.S. population, according to Health Union. This condition causes digestive issues, such as abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and constipation. Those living with IBS can relieve such symptoms and manage the disorder by making smarter lifestyle choices, such as mitigating stress and following a proper diet. Consuming more fiber is one of the easiest ways to regulate digestion and normalize bowel movements.

Those who are currently living with digestive issues, or wish to achieve a healthier weight, lower cholesterol levels or control blood sugar levels, can consider adding more high-fiber foods to their everyday diet. According to the Mayo Clinic, women should eat at least 21 to 25 grams of fiber every day, while men should consume at least 30 to 38 grams per day. Here are some of the best fiber-rich foods to add to your daily diet:

1. Fruits
Raspberries, pears, apples, bananas, oranges, figs and raisins make excellent sources of fiber when eaten raw. Eat these options as snacks, or add them to your breakfast.

Raspberries are high in fiber and make a delicious snack.Raspberries are high in fiber and make a delicious snack.Raspberries are high in fiber and make a delicious snack.

2. Vegetables
As a high priority in any plant-based diet, most of your fiber will likely come from the vegetables you consume. Options like artichokes, broccoli, turnip greens, Brussels sprouts and carrots are versatile, high in fiber and loaded with flavor.

3. Whole grains
Whole-wheat barley, bran flakes, organic oatmeal and whole-wheat bread are a few of the fiber-rich options you can consume on a plant-based diet.

4. Legumes, nuts and seeds
Lentils, black beans, lima beans, almonds, pistachios and pecans are high in fiber. Add beans to your lunches and dinners, and consume nuts as a snack or for dessert.

Try Hallelujah Diet Fiber Cleanse
Besides including fiber-rich foods in your plant-based diet, you may consider a supplemental approach to digestive relief as well. Our Hallelujah Diet Fiber Cleanse contains a balanced blend of 28 herbs in a psyllium and flaxseed base that helps to cleanse the colon, restore optimal bowel function and eliminate toxins from the body. This supplement is the easiest way to detoxify your body and reduce the chance of poisoning your system.

For more information on our best-selling nutrients, shop our database of supplements today.


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12 Aug

“I made brownies! Here have one.”

“Oh, they smell so good! Thank you, but I had a big breakfast and I’m still full.” (a white lie)

“Come on. It’s just a little brownie.”

“Really, I appreciate it, but no thank you.”

“Really? You’re such a health freak that you won’t even eat the brownie I made?”

 

That escalated quickly. Another example of the oh-too-frequent social guilt of not consuming what others want you to.

 

 

We live in an odd world. If your experience is anything like mine, treats are such a common staple of every event where humans congregate that you couldn’t possibly eat them every time they were offered without gaining a good bit of unwanted weight.

 

Even with the best of intentions, it is common to find yourself losing all control to guilt—your buddy who wants you to have beers when you stop by or Grandma who always has cookies on hand. Their offer is full of love, but you don’t want what they are offering. Saying no is interpreted as a rejection of them, not the offer.

 

In day to day interactions, the only responses that have a chance of not offending are:

 

  • I don’t feel very well. I think I’m sick.
  • I’m having a colonoscopy this afternoon and can’t eat anything.
  • Or, I’m doing 20 day cleanse. Yeah, right now I can only eat alfalfa grass, beet juice, and this $72 meal replacement shake. (People totally understand a diet with a deadline. What tends to upset them is actually changing your lifestyle.)

 

Understanding Guilt

Food can be emotional. People often feel legitimately offended by your decision not to consume what they want you to, but that is on them. They are responsible for their emotions, not you.

 

You haven’t physically harmed them, dissed them, or even gone on a rant about how sugar is the devil. If you respectfully decline and their feelings are hurt, that really is not your problem. This is much easier said than done, but it is an essential understanding for living authentically in this bizarre world.

 

Guilt is a form of manipulation. When people try to make you feel guilty they are trying to coerce your behavior to fit what meets their desires, irrespective of what you want. This is especially problematic when it comes to food.

 

The Western diet has brought society to epidemic poor health that is hard to truly appreciate. The decision to reject common norms and value your own health is one of the best things you could ever do. Anyone coercing you to break your own rules and weaken your habits is not a benign force, but a negative one, at least at that moment.

 

This is all very general and overly-dramatic. They certainly aren’t evil, but we have to clearly understand that making them feel better is not our job. Certainly, you should feel free to have treats, but if you’ve decided this isn’t the time (as health will often require you to), then that is a mature decision that they should respect. Any other response is a reflection on them, not you.

 

 

Boundaries 101

You are not responsible for their emotions. The opposite is also true. No one is responsible for your emotions, except you. Good relationships are built on this understanding. People interact honestly and support each other in the pursuits they find meaningful. It is not that there is a sociopathic disregard for the emotions of other humans. Empathy is intact, yet that empathy is founded on the understanding that personal responsibility precludes lasting fulfillment.

 

How to Say No: A Guide to Guilt and Eating - Fitness, nutrition, rules, clean eating, diet advice, social norms, healthy lifestyle, lifestyle design, guilt, adherence, boundariesHow to Say No: A Guide to Guilt and Eating - Fitness, nutrition, rules, clean eating, diet advice, social norms, healthy lifestyle, lifestyle design, guilt, adherence, boundaries

 

Dysfunctional relationships tend to feature one person (the needy) frequently guilting the other (someone needing to be needed) into acquiescing to their every wish. This dynamic isn’t good for anyone. The needy needs tough realities to help them take personal responsibility.

 

Being “kind” to him by giving in is actually a veiled form of cruelty that keeps him immature and dependent. Alternatively, the needed must learn to resist the guilt that controls her so she can feel peace and invest her energy more fruitfully.

 

I get that you could take this too far. For example, my grandfather has been having a hell of a time with his prostate cancer and he recently moved into a senior living center in Florida. I went down to see him and we had a great morning full of good conversation.

 

He then grabbed a Dove chocolate from the bowl next to his chair and asked me, “Do you allow yourself an occasional chocolate square?” Absolutely! I’d have been a real jerk to pass on that.

 

I’m not saying you shouldn’t do things for other people or that you shouldn’t ever have a spontaneous cookie at grandma’s. The problem is when we are constantly pulling ourselves away from our self-development goals in order to please others. This is almost always bad and it is a particularly large problem when it comes to food.

 

What you eat matters. It affects your health, your energy, and the way you live your life. You have to have boundaries that you’ll stand for in order to be healthy. Boundaries are, in effect, rules we set for ourselves. I am determined not to let other people dictate what foods I consume. Sure, I’ll allow myself to be pulled in by the fun of an evening out, but only on my terms. Not through guilt. That is my rule.

 

This goes further than just our boundaries with other people. Every healthy and successful person I know has strong boundaries in their fitness and work as well. They set rules for themselves and follow them, because you can’t rely on motivation or feeling “locked in,” to accomplish an objective.

 

If you want to be healthy you’ll have to start workouts even when you aren’t “feeling it” and eat well even when you are having cravings. Boundaries free us from the tyranny of deliberation. They create clarity in our values and help us act as we’d want to, absent of impulse. For more help clarifying values and creating systems to help you act, check out my free ebook, The Essential Guide to Self-Mastery.

 

How to Say No

To me, good living boils down to our motto at Inspired Human Development: Define values and act accordingly. It is simple, but it isn’t easy. Saying no when you feel pressured to eat something that you don’t want to is great practice.

 

It tends to follow these simple steps:

 

  1. Say no, thank you. Any pushing after that makes them the jerk, not you. If they have a problem with your decision to control what you put in your own mouth, they are the problem.

 

I guess that’s just one step, and that is it. You don’t need to explain yourself, just smile and say “No, thank you.” You don’t have to have an excuse. You aren’t doing anything wrong. Still, the more respectful and unemotional you are, the more diffused they’ll become.

 

In the past, I’ve found that my defensiveness tended to incite a reciprocal hostility on the other end. Meditation has helped me not to project my fears and fuel the fire. This isn’t a failsafe, however. There will be those who just can’t understand why you are doing this to them. That is life. We can’t please everyone.


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30 Jul

 

You could jeopardize your overall health if you don’t pay attention to the foods you eat. Consuming too much junk food, for example, can lead to chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, clogged arteries and more.

Making the decision to improve your lifestyle by following a primarily raw, plant-based diet is a health-conscious decision that improves your metabolism, boosts your immune system and promotes overall wellness and longevity while reducing your risk for chronic conditions like the ones listed above. Some of the most important healthy diet staples consist of vegetables, and that’s because they’re so high in nutrients and provide a multitude of benefits.

But just how favorable are veggies when it comes to overall wellness? Here are the top five benefits of eating vegetables:

1. They’re an Important Source of Nutrients
When your diet consists of eating a plethora of vegetables, you’re fueling your body with many of the vital nutrients it needs to thrive. According to Choose My Plate, a healthy eating initiative by the United States Department of Agriculture, vegetables are rich in potassium, fiber, folic acid, vitamins A and C and more.

2. They’re Low in Calories
Vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories. This means you can fill up on a lunch of veggies without worrying about going over your suggested daily caloric intake. This makes it easier to eat hearty meals without worrying about counting calories, and can also aid weight loss and maintenance.

3. They Promote Optimal Gut Function
Fiber is beneficial to the body in the sense that it can reduce the occurrence of bowel problems, such as constipation. Due to the water and fiber content in most vegetables, Dr. Mercola suggests that these healthy foods nourish beneficial bacteria in the gut, which keeps it healthy and regular.

4. They’re a Natural Mood Booster
You know that following a diet rich in vegetables is great for your physical health, but have you considered how beneficial it is for your mental well-being? According to Mental Health America, following a diet that relies on nuts, whole grains, fruits, unsaturated fats and vegetables is better for mental wellness than one that consists of meat and dairy products. Additionally, MHA said that those who follow a primarily raw, plant-based diet are 30 percent less likely to develop depression.

5. They’re Great for Immunity
Since vegetables are loaded with essential nutrients, they have a great reputation for boosting the immune system. Specifically, leafy green vegetables activate T-bet, a gene that produces immune cells in the gut, according to Dr. Mercola. Those immune cells maintain immunity and inflammation, protect the body from pathogenic bacteria, improve intestinal balance and prevent food allergies.

Beyond consuming vegetables, you may consider our Advanced Superfood product. The blend of 35 organic ingredients, including cereal grass juice powders, leafy greens, microalgae, sprouts, prebiotic fibers, sea vegetables, and other vegetables, makes this product one of the most nutritious and convenient ways to fuel your body.


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10 Jul

Lack of sleep may be considered an animal welfare concern, and scientists hope to lay the foundation for future research, reports Dairy Herd Management.

A variety of factors may influence sleep. Cattle in the 2019 study were housed at different farms and exposed to different management routines. While the timing of sleep differed among farms, the overall duration of sleep remained similar, suggesting management routine did not influence total sleep hours. Rather, differences in sleep over the lactation cycle may be influenced by cows’ day-to-day needs.

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