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17 Nov

This homemade, healthy granola recipe packs a delicious pumpkin spice punch, perfect for fall, and it’s made entirely with good for you ingredients (200 calories or 6 WW points). It’s an easy make-ahead breakfast or snack and since it stores well at room temperature or in the freezer, it would be a great homemade gift!

We’re in the thick of pumpkin spice season, friends, and this homemade healthy granola is a hit at our house. It’s quick to make and every ingredient is both nutritious and probably already in your pantry: rolled oats, pepitas (a type of pumpkin seed), canned pumpkin puree, pure maple syrup, coconut oil, and warm fall spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves. The maple syrup sweetens it juuust enough—not too little, not too much—and the aromatic cinnamon and ginger add warmth, depth, and help to bring out even more natural sweetness.

How To Make a Healthy Pumpkin Spice Granola

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and line a large, rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine 3 cups oats and 1/2 cup of pepitas.
  • In a small saucepan, whisk together coconut oil, canned pumpkin, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cloves, a pinch of salt. Heat the mixture over medium heat, whisking occasionally, until the coconut oil is melted and the mixture is warm. Pour this warm pumpkin mixture over the oats and pepitas and mix well with a spoon. Scoop the granola onto your prepared pan and use a large spoon to spread it in an even layer.
  • Bake until until golden brown, 20 to 25 minutes. The granola will further crisp up as it cools.
  • Let the granola cool completely, undisturbed, then break the granola into pieces with your hands, separating it into big or small chunks depending on your preference.
top down shot of easy granola on a baking traytop down shot of easy granola on a baking tray
overhead shot of granola on a baking trayoverhead shot of granola on a baking tray

Tips for Better Granola

  • Be sure to line your baking sheet with parchment paper so that the sweet stuff sticks to your oats rather than the pan.
  • Heating your wet ingredients and spices (coconut oil, canned pumpkin, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cloves, and salt) in a small saucepan serves to melt the coconut oil (like butter, coconut oil is a solid at room temperature), allowing it to combine more easily with the other ingredients, and ensures that all of the flavorful ingredients and spices are evenly mixed into a sort-of sauce that you can pour over your oats.
  • Instead of heating your wet ingredients on the stove, you can whisk them together in a microwave-safe bowl and then heat them for 45 seconds to 1 minute.
  • For chunky granola, gently press down on the granola with the back of a spatula after spreading it on your baking sheet before baking. Not stirring the granola halfway through baking also helps to create a clumpier texture.
  • Don’t bake the granola too long—just until it’s golden on top. It might seem a little soft to the touch when you remove it from the oven, but it will continue to crisp up as it cools.
  • Using pepitas, a type of pumpkin seeds, makes this recipe nut-free, which would make the granola an allergy-friendly option for your kids to bring to school. Pecans, almonds, or walnuts would work just as well.
easy granola recipe in a serving glasseasy granola recipe in a serving glass

How Long Will Homemade Granola Last?

After your granola has completely cooled, store it in an air-tight container at room temperature for up to 10 days. You can also freeze the granola just as you would cookies or other treats—either wrapped tightly in a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of aluminum foil or in resealable freezer bag.

Check Out These Other Easy Breakfast Recipes

Cashew Ginger Granola with Dates and Sesame Seeds
Roasted Butternut Squash with Granola and Greek Yogurt
Toasted Coconut and Pineapple Granola
Slow Cooker Oatmeal 3 Ways
Superfood Green Smoothie Bowl
DIY Breakfast Toast Bar
Banana Oatmeal Recipe by Chocolate Covered Katie
Healthy Blueberry Muffins by Well Plated

If you have tried this Easy Granola recipe, or any other recipe on my blog, please let me know how it turned out in the comments below! You can also follow me on FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM and PINTEREST to see more delicious, healthy, family-friendly food!

Healthy Pumpkin Spice Granola

Prep Time10 mins

Cook Time25 mins

Total Time35 mins

Course: Breakfast, Snacks

Servings: 12 1/4-cup servings

Calories: 208kcal

  • 3 cups old fashioned rolled oats
  • ½ cup pepitas (or chopped pecans)
  • ¼ cup coconut oil
  • ½ cup canned pumpkin puree
  • cup pure maple syrup
  • 1 ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • pinch ground cloves
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

  • In a large bowl, mix the oats and pepitas.

  • In a small saucepan, whisk together the coconut oil, pumpkin, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cloves, and salt. Heat over medium heat, whisking occasionally, until the coconut oil is melted and the mixture is warm. (Alternatively, you can whisk these ingredients in a microwave-safe bowl and then heat for 45 seconds to 1 minute.

  • Pour this pumpkin mixture over the oats and pepitas and mix well with a spoon. Spread mixture onto your prepared baking sheet and bake until golden brown, 20 to 25 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and let it cool completely, undisturbed (it will crisp as it cools). Once cool, break the granola into pieces with your hands if you want to retain big chunks, or break it apart with a wooden spoon if you don’t want extra-clumpy granola.

  • Store in an air-tight container at room temperature for up to 10 days.

Calories: 208kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 10g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Sodium: 62mg | Potassium: 184mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 1906IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 34mg | Iron: 2mg


Credit: Source link

26 Sep

This easy pot roast recipe is tried and true. The slow cooked beef chuck is fall-apart tender and the vegetables are soft, soaked with rich beef stock, red wine, and fragrant rosemary, thyme, and bay. It’s a classic one pot recipe you’ll make over and over again! 575 calories or 11 WW points.

What is Pot Roast?

Pot roast isn’t a cut of meat itself. It’s a savory, braised beef dish made by browning the meat before cooking it “low and slow” in a covered casserole dish or Dutch oven. In most recipes, you will brown the roast on the stovetop first, then transfer it to the oven or a slow cooker.

To prevent the roast from drying out, you will add liquid (such as beef stock, broth, or water) to the bottom of the dish holding the roast. To this a complete complete meal, add chopped-up potatoes and vegetables to the dish, cooking it along with the roast.

Now, if this is your first time making a pot roast dinner, it can seem intimidating to cook but trust me, it’s relatively easy (see the step-by-step instructions below). Like other beef chuck recipes, this one doesn’t require you to be ultra-precise about timing. It will cook in anywhere from 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 hours and you’ll know it’s done when the meat is tender enough that it can be pulled apart with a fork (so if it’s not there yet, let it keep cooking).

Which is the Best Cut of Meat for Pot Roast?

Choosing a cut of meat for your pot roast can be kind of counter-intuitive , because the tougher the cut, the better the pot roast.

You may be used to choosing tender, juicy steaks from the meat counter, but with pot roast, it’s the opposite. Tougher cuts of meat have lots of tough connective tissue, so when you cook the roast at a low temperature for a long period of time, the tissues soften.

Don’t rush the process! Allowing the meat to simmer for hours results in the tender, melt-in-your-mouth roast you’re after!

A boneless chuck roast is my favorite pick for pot roast. It has outstanding marbling, making the roast tender and juicy when braised. Cut from the shoulder just above the short rib, it is a tougher, albeit more affordable cut than those from the front part of the animal, like the sirloin or short loin.

Other cuts that are either the same (under a different name) or come from the same area are the chuck eye, blade roast, shoulder roast, shoulder steak, arm steak, arm roast, cross-rib roast, or seven-bone roast. Some butchers also sell the chuck generically labeled as “pot roast.”

pot roast in a pot on a tablepot roast in a pot on a table

How to Make Pot Roast

shot of chuck beefshot of chuck beef

In a Dutch oven, heat a tablespoon of olive oil and a tablespoon of butter over medium-high heat. Season your beef chuck roast all over with salt and pepper and add it to the pan, browning it on all sides (about 15 minutes).

shot of onions in a pot for the pot roast recipeshot of onions in a pot for the pot roast recipe

Add 1 chopped onion and 5 minced cloves of garlic and cook for 2 minutes.

stirring the onions with red wine for the pot roast recipestirring the onions with red wine for the pot roast recipe

Add a cup of dry red wine (I like merlot or cabernet sauvignon). Bring to a simmer, scraping up the browned, crispy bits on the bottom of the pan, and cook until the liquid is reduced by half.

ingredients for the pot roast recipe simmeringingredients for the pot roast recipe simmering

Add 3 cups of low-sodium beef stock; bring to a boil.

top down shot of beef in pottop down shot of beef in pot

Return the beef to the pan. Add sprigs of fresh rosemary, thyme, and 2 dried bay leaves.

top down shot of vegetables in a pottop down shot of vegetables in a pot

Add a pound of chopped Yukon Gold potatoes and 4 chopped carrots. Cover, transfer the dish to the oven, and roast at 325 degrees F for 3.5-4 hours, until the beef is fork tender.

shot of finished pot roast recipeshot of finished pot roast recipe

What Goes with Pot Roast

Pot roast is an easy one pot meal, but if you are looking to serve t up with other side dishes, here are some great ideas:

  • Mashed Potatoes
  • Fluffy Dinner Rolls
  • Roasted Green Beans
  • Homemade Applesauce
  • Creamed Spinach
  • Cauliflower Cheese
  • Roasted Asparagus

Pot Roast

A classic one pot recipe (575 calories or 11 WW points) with slow cooked beef chuck that’s fall-apart tender and vegetables that are soft and soaked with rich beef stock, red wine, and fragrant rosemary, thyme, and bay.

Prep Time10 mins

Cook Time4 hrs

Total Time4 hrs 10 mins

Course: Beef, Main Course

Cuisine: American

Servings: 8

Calories: 577

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 4 1/2 pound boneless beef chuck roast
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 large sweet onion, chopped
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup dry red wine (I use merlot or cabernet sauvignon)
  • 3 cups beef broth low sodium
  • 1 pound potatoes, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces Yukon Gold
  • 4 large carrots, peeled and cut on the diagonal into 2-inch pieces
  • 3 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • Preheat the oven to 325°F. In a Dutch oven, heat the oil and butter over medium-high heat until the butter melts. Season the beef all over with the salt and pepper. Add to the pan; cook until browned on all sides, about 15 minutes. Remove the beef to a plate.

  • Add the onions and garlic to pan and cook, stirring frequently, about 2 minutes. Add the wine and bring to a simmer, scraping up the crispy bits on the bottom of the pan as you go. Let the wine simmer until the liquid is reduced by half. Add the beef stock and bring to boil. Return the beef to pan. Add the potatoes, carrots, rosemary, thyme, and bay leaves. Cover and transfer the pan to the oven. Roast until the beef is so tender that you can pull it apart easily using 2 forks, 3 ½ to 4 hours (depending on the size of your pot roast). Transfer the beef to a bowl, the vegetables to a separate platter or bowl, and reserve the cooking liquid. Discard the rosemary and thyme sprigs and the bay leaves. Use 2 forks to shred the beef or pull it into chunks. Add some of the reserved cooking liquid to the beef to keep it moist and tender. Serve with the vegetables. Leftovers will keep, stored in a covered container in the refrigerator, for 5 days.

1 serving (1/8 of recipe): 11 WW points

Calories: 577kcal | Carbohydrates: 14g | Protein: 52g | Fat: 33g | Saturated Fat: 14g | Cholesterol: 180mg | Sodium: 877mg | Potassium: 1280mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 6110IU | Vitamin C: 11mg | Calcium: 87mg | Iron: 8mg

Credit: Source link

23 Sep

1 Start the sauce: Heat the olive oil in a saucepan on medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the minced garlic. Cook until fragrant, about a minute more.

Then add the crushed tomatoes, oregano, red pepper flakes, and sugar. Bring to a simmer; reduce the heat to maintain the simmer. Cook, uncovered while you prepare the chicken (about 10 to 12 minutes).

2 Preheat oven to 400°F.

3 Pound cutlets thin: Place the chicken cutlets one at a time between two layers of plastic wrap or wax paper. Use a meat hammer, mallet, rolling pin, or even a heavy empty wine bottle to pound or roll the chicken pieces to an even thickness of 1/4 to 1/2-inch. Sprinkle salt on both sides of the cutlets.

Easy Chicken Parmesan pound the cutlets with a malletEasy Chicken Parmesan pound the cutlets with a mallet

4 Prepare breadcrumbs and eggs for dredging: In a shallow bowl (large enough to dredge the cutlets), mix together the breadcrumbs, 1/2 cup Parmesan, and pinch of salt. In separate shallow bowl, whisk together the eggs.

5 Dredge cutlets and brown them: Heat 1/4 cup olive oil in a large sauté pan on medium-high heat until the oil is shimmering (not smoking) and a piece of breading dropped into it sizzles.

Working one cutlet at a time, dip the chicken cutlet into the egg mixture and then into the breadcrumbs. Working in batches as to not crowd the pan, place the dredged cutlets into the pan.

Lower the heat to medium and gently fry the chicken cutlets until they are golden brown on each side, about 3 to 4 minutes per side.

Chicken Parmesan recipe dip the chicken into the eggChicken Parmesan recipe dip the chicken into the egg Baked Chicken Parmesan dredge the chicken in breadcrumbsBaked Chicken Parmesan dredge the chicken in breadcrumbsBaked chicken parmesan recipe brown the cutletsBaked chicken parmesan recipe brown the cutlets

6 Prep the chicken for the oven: Spread enough tomato sauce to thickly coat the bottom of a 9×13 casserole pan or baking dish. Once the cutlets are browned on both sides, arrange them on top of the tomato sauce in the baking dish.

Spoon tomato sauce over each of the cutlets. Sprinkle the tops with sliced basil. Then lay slices of mozzarella over each cutlet and sprinkle with the remaining 1/2 cup of Parmesan cheese.

Prep the chicken parmesan for the oven in the casserole dishPrep the chicken parmesan for the oven in the casserole dish

7 Bake: Bake in the oven at 400°F for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the mozzarella begins to brown.

Baked Chicken Parmesan bake the chicken in the oven in a casserole dishBaked Chicken Parmesan bake the chicken in the oven in a casserole dish

8 Serve: Serve with pasta and the remaining sauce, or in a large roll.

Credit: Source link

22 Sep

Naan that is light and fluffy, brushed with melted butter and garnished with freshly chopped cilantro with the perfect amount of flavor so you just can’t stop eating it!

 

A photo of four pieces of homemade naan stacked on each other.A photo of four pieces of homemade naan stacked on each other.

 

There’s a restaurant in Utah called, Bombay House and I love their naan bread. I mean, it’s bread so of course I do. #carbsforever But until I discovered this Easy Homemade Naan Recipe I’d never tried it at home. 

It can’t be denied, I’m a dipper and a sopper. I love dipping my bread in oils and vinegars, sopping up excess sauce on my plate and just eating it to stuff my face. I love bread. 

A photo of a piece of homemade naan garnished with cilantro.

A photo of a piece of homemade naan garnished with cilantro.A photo of a piece of homemade naan garnished with cilantro.

 

There are so many recipes out there and I started testing them all…like everything I could find online and trying all my own creations and I just could not settle on any. There were plain yeast recipes, recipes with baking powder and baking soda, overnight recipes, 30 minute recipes and recipes that use milk and I hated them all. 

And then I found one on America’s Test Kitchen and once again they nailed it. Now listen, after saying that I shouldn’t admit this, but I still changed the recipe because this method just worked better for me. 

 

A photo of four pieces of homemade naan stacked on each other.

A photo of four pieces of homemade naan stacked on each other.A photo of four pieces of homemade naan stacked on each other.

 

How is Naan Made?

Making naan at home is easy and just as simple as making your traditional dinner roll. Here are the steps:

  1. Activate yeast: combine water, yeast and sugar in a small bowl and let it sit for about 5 minutes until it gets foamy
  2. Wet ingredients: whisk together the yogurt, oil and egg yolk and combine with the yeast mixture
  3. Dry ingredients: add the flour to a food processor and start it on low, slowly add the wet ingredients and process until it the dough comes together. Let the dough rest for 10 minutes.
  4. Salt: salt is a snob and gets it’s own step, but oh how I love salt! Add salt to the dough and process it until the dough comes all together again and then place it in a glass bowl covered to rise for at least an hour or up to 24 hours in the refrigerator.
  5. Divide the dough: pull the dough out and place it on a floured surface. Divide the dough into 4-8 pieces depending on how big you want the pieces. Cover with plastic wrap and let them rest for 30 minutes.
  6. Cook the naan: after setting the oven to warm and placing an oven safe dish inside, roll one dough ball out into a thin circle and place into a hot cast iron skillet that has been drizzled with olive oil. Cover the skilled and cook for 2-3 minutes. Flip it to the other side and cook for another 1-2 minutes. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with chopped fresh cilantro.
  7. Keep warm: place the cooked naan on to the warming plate in the oven and cover with foil. Repeat this same process with the remaining dough ball.

 

A photo of two pieces of naan bread on a blue cloth napkin and a basting brush.

A photo of two pieces of naan bread on a blue cloth napkin and a basting brush.A photo of two pieces of naan bread on a blue cloth napkin and a basting brush.

 

What to Eat with Naan Bread?

I could eat naan on its own with nothing else for a meal, but I’m weird like that! Carbs are life!

We love it with our easy coconut chicken curry and our Instant Pot honey chicken. Our kids love to take any naan leftovers we might have and make naan pizzas! We have a copycat Bombay House vegetarian tikka masala recipe too that pairs perfectly with naan.

Is Naan Bread Good For Weight Loss?

Short answer…no, not really. It is made with refined white flour that the body treats like sugar. There are worse things out there for weight loss, but I wouldn’t make this a regular part of your diet if you are trying to lose weight.

 

A photo of four pieces of homemade naan stacked on each other.

A photo of four pieces of homemade naan stacked on each other.A photo of four pieces of homemade naan stacked on each other.

 

Is Naan Bread Unleavened?

No, this naan recipe contains yeast which is a leavening agent.

How Long Will Naan Bread Keep?

If you store naan in an airtight container at room temperature, it will last up to 3 days. Store it in the refrigerator and it will last up to a week. It can also be frozen and it will be good for up to 2 months. When you are ready to eat it, let it come to room temperature and then re-crisp it in broiler or wrap them up in foil and warm them in the oven at 350 degrees for 10ish minutes.

Does Naan Bread Need to Be Refrigerated?

No, it does not need to be refrigerated, but if you want it to last a little longer, refrigerating can help with that as mentioned above.

 

A photo of perfectly cooked naan bread.

A photo of perfectly cooked naan bread.A photo of perfectly cooked naan bread.

 

If you have never tried naan, then smack yo’self and make this recipe! It is so irresistible! I seriously can’t stop myself!

 

More BREAD SIDES You’ll Love:

 

Easy Homemade Naan Recipe

It’s light and fluffy, with the perfect amount of flavor so you just can’t stop eating this easy homemade naan recipe brushed with melted butter and garnished with freshly chopped cilantro

Prep Time2 hrs

Cook Time4 mins

Total Time2 hrs 4 mins

Course: Yeast Bread Recipes and Quick Bread Recipes

Cuisine: Indian

Keyword: bread, side dish

Servings: 8 rounds

Calories: 171kcal

  • 1/2 Cup Warm Water
  • 1 1/2 Teaspoons Sugar
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Instant Yeast
  • 1/3 Cup Plain Whole Milk Yogurt
  • 3 Tablespoons Vegetable Oil
  • 1 Large Egg Yolk
  • 2 Cups Flour
  • 1 1/4 Teaspoons Salt
  • 2 Tablespoons Butter, unsalted
  • 1 Tablespoon Chopped Cilantro
  • In a small bowl, add the water, sugar and yeast. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes.

  • Whisk in the yogurt, oil and egg yolk.

  • In a food processor, add the flour and then turn it on to low. While the processor is running, slowly pour in the wet ingredients and process until the dough just comes together.

  • Allow the dough to rest for 10 minutes.

  • Add salt to the dough and process again until the dough comes together in a smooth ball. Transfer the dough to a glass bowl with a drizzle of oil and roll the dough to coat all sides. Cover tightly in plastic wrap and allow to rest on the counter for up to 1 hour, or in the fridge up to 24 hours.

  • Remove the bowl from the fridge and sprinkle flour on the counter. Divide the dough into 4-8 pieces depending on how big you want it and roll each piece into a ball. Cover with plastic and allow to rest for 30 minutes.

  • Turn the oven to warm, or 200 degrees and plate an oven safe dish in it. Get out a piece of foil so that each finished naan bread can be placed on the plate in the oven and covered with foil to keep everything warm while you’re cooking.

  • Sprinkle flour on the counter again and roll each ball out into thin circles.

  • Meanwhile, heat a cast iron pan over medium high heat and drizzle with oil. Using a napkin, wipe out excess oil. Throw one circle of dough in the pan and cover with a lid. Allow to cook for 2-3 minutes or until the bottom is lightly brown and bubbles are appearing on top. The bottom will be flat and golden while the top will have those perfect browned bubble spots. This is normal.

  • Remove the lid, using a spatula flip the naan and cook for another 1-2 minutes uncovered. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with cilantro. Place on the warming plate and repeat until all dough is used.

Serving: 1piece | Calories: 171kcal | Carbohydrates: 25g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 6g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Cholesterol: 1mg | Sodium: 370mg | Potassium: 56mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 10IU | Calcium: 17mg | Iron: 1mg

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Credit: Source link

19 Sep

You can make this. I promise. Even if you don’t think you’re much of a baker. It’s a golden crusted focaccia draped with whisper thin rounds of Meyer lemon, studded with black olives, and a showered with sliced almonds. The dough is herb-flecked with a generous boost of hemp seeds, and a percentage of rye flour if you happen to have some on hand. It’s the same one I posted to my Instagram feed, and It’s the one focaccia recipe you need! 

Meyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and HerbsMeyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and Herbs

The Pre-bake:

The shot above is what the focaccia looks like prior to baking. I used an enameled cast-iron baking pan, but(!) you can absolutely make the focaccia free-form (just shape it on a standard baking sheet). A third option is a cast iron skillet. I baked the last version I did in a 9-inch cast iron skillet. Experiment and have fun with it!

Meyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and Herbs

Meyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and HerbsMeyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and Herbs

Focaccia Inspiration

I’ve been on a bit of a focaccia bender lately after making Nigel Slater’s Cranberry Focaccia for New Years Eve (from The Christmas Chronicles). I forgot how simple and satisfying it is to make, and all the different ways you can top it based on what you have around the kitchen. You can adapt the recipe with all sorts of alternate toppings! Have fun experimenting.

Meyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and HerbsMeyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and HerbsMeyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and Herbs

Choosing the Correct Yeast:

This recipe calls for instant yeast, and I’m including a shot of the exact yeast I used for reference below. You can add it directly to the dough. Different than active dry yeast.

Meyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and Herbs

Meyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and HerbsMeyer Lemon Focaccia with Hemp Seeds and Herbs

If you make this, or a riff on it, tag me on Instagram (heidijswanson) so I can see :)!


Credit: Source link

18 Sep

It’s Hatch green chile season here in Colorado, so because my kids love soup (and because I’ve found that’s a good way to introduce them to new flavors!), I decided to make a big pot of green chicken chili to give them a taste of Hatch chiles!

Roasted green chiles don’t have to be spicy. I used mild Hatch chiles, so the soup was kid-friendly but still rich and savory—and with a great chile flavor!

Hatch green chicken chili recipeHatch green chicken chili recipe

Why Is It Called Green Chili?

Nothing too complicated here: It’s called “green” chili because it calls for (surprise!) green chiles, as opposed to your standard “red” chili, which is made with beef and tomatoes.

I also added a green bell pepper and a few big handfuls of herbs to really play up the “green” factor!

What Kind of Chicken Should I Use?

You can certainly poach your own chicken for this if you want. If you do, use the poaching liquid to make a stock and then use that in the chili. You’ll end up with a really rich and delicious soup.

But perfect is the enemy of good in the kitchen, so I used rotisserie chicken for this quick weeknight chili recipe. A small-to-medium rotisserie chicken will give you about 2 1/2 to 3 cups of shredded chicken meat, which is the perfect amount for this recipe.

A bag of mild chopped Hatch green chilesA bag of mild chopped Hatch green chiles

A bag of mild chopped Hatch green chilesA bag of mild chopped Hatch green chiles

The Best Green Chiles for This Soup

There are a lot of options out there for Hatch chiles, especially this time of year. Here’s the hierarchy of chile choice:

  1. Freshly roasted Hatch chiles: If you live in an area where you can find freshly roasted green chiles, those are far and away the best and should always be your first choice where possible. You can also roast your own chiles at home!
  2. Frozen roasted Hatch chiles: If you can’t find freshly roasted chiles, opt for frozen roasted chiles, which still have great flavor. Look for them with the other frozen vegetables, especially at Mexican grocery stores or stores that have a good selection of Mexican ingredients.
  3. Canned or jarred green chilies: If you can’t find either of those two options, then a jar of green chiles is the way to go. You need a lot of green chiles for this recipe, so go for a big 16-ounce jar if you can find it! If you are using canned green chiles, look for Hatch green chiles, but also Old El Paso makes a great canned mild green chile.

A bowl of green chili soup with crispy tortilla chips and avocadoA bowl of green chili soup with crispy tortilla chips and avocado

A bowl of green chili soup with crispy tortilla chips and avocadoA bowl of green chili soup with crispy tortilla chips and avocado

How to Make Green Chili In a Slow Cooker

This recipe is meant to be a fast weeknight recipe, but it can also work in a slow cooker.

If you’re doing it this way, place a whole (3ish-pound) raw chicken in the slow cooker. Add the water, onion, garlic, and 1/2 cup each chopped carrot and celery. (The carrot and celery are only called for if you make this in the slow cooker, since I find it helps with the stock’s flavor. It’s not needed if you make the chili on the stove.)

Cook for four hours on high, then strain the stock and use it for your soup. Discard the veggies. Shred the chicken and return it to the slow cooker. Add all the remaining soup ingredients except the cilantro and cannellini beans.

Simmer the soup on low heat for two hours. Meanwhile, in a food processor, blend the cannellini beans with 1/2 cup cilantro and 1/4 cup water. After two hours, stir the blended beans into the soup to thicken it slightly. Done!

How to Store Leftovers

If you like this recipe, I recommend doubling it so you can have some for dinner and plenty to freeze for later! This chili stores well in the fridge for up to five days, and will freeze perfectly for up to three months if stored in a freezer-safe bag or airtight container. Reheat the soup gently on the stovetop.

Eat Your Food - Dad AddEat Your Food - Dad AddEat Your Food - Dad AddEat Your Food - Dad AddThe DAD ADD: Crispy Corn Chips

These are basically upgraded tortilla chips, but they add some delicious crunch to the chili! I like to add a pinch of sugar to the chips’ seasoning; the sweetness goes really well with the chili’s subtle heat. Make sure to pile them high in your bowl!

Kids eating Hatch green chili soupKids eating Hatch green chili soup

Kids eating Hatch green chili soupKids eating Hatch green chili soup

Eat Your Food - The Kid ReportEat Your Food - The Kid ReportEat Your Food - The Kid ReportEat Your Food - The Kid ReportREPORT CARD

My kids love soup, so I hoped this would be a winner. My only concern was that it might be too spicy, even with mild green chiles. Both of my kiddos picked out the chicken first and loved it. Then they slurped the soup a bit, but when they saw my Dad Add chips they proceeded to steal ALL OF THEM for dipping and eating. A dad’s sacrifice is real.

So, yes, kids like this soup! If you want more of a kick, spice up your own bowl with a bit of hot sauce, which I definitely did.

More Great Green Chile Recipes: 

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12 Sep

1 Prepare the brisket: On one side of the brisket there should be a layer of fat, which you want. If there are any large chunks of fat, cut them off and discard them. Large pieces of fat will not be able to render out completely.

Using a sharp knife, score the fat in parallel lines, about 3/4-inch apart. Slice through the fat, not the beef. Repeat in the opposite direction to make a cross-hatch pattern.

Salt the brisket well and let it sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.

2 Sear the brisket: You’ll need an ovenproof, thick-bottomed pot with a cover, or Dutch oven, that is just wide enough to hold the brisket roast with a little room for the onions.

Pat the brisket dry and place it, fatty side down, into the pot and place it on medium high heat. Cook for 5 to 8 minutes, lightly sizzling, until the fat side is nicely browned. (If the roast seems to be cooking too fast, turn the heat down to medium. You want a steady sizzle, not a raging sear.)

Turn the brisket over and cook for a few minutes more to brown the other side.

3 Sauté the onions and garlic: When the brisket has browned, remove it from the pot and set aside. There should be a couple tablespoons of fat rendered in the pot. If not, add some olive oil.

Add the chopped onions and increase the heat to high. Sprinkle a little salt on the onions. Sauté, stirring often, until the onions are lightly browned, 5 to 8 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook 1 to 2 more minutes.

4 Simmer the brisket and roast it: Preheat the oven to 300°F (150°C). Use kitchen twine to tie together the bay leaves, rosemary and thyme.

Move the onions and garlic to the sides of the pot and nestle the brisket inside. Add the beef stock and the tied-up herbs. Bring the stock to a boil on the stovetop.Cover the pot, then place in the 300°F (150°C) oven. Cook for 3 hours. Carefully flip the brisket every hour so it cooks evenly.

Beef Brisket RecipeBeef Brisket Recipe

5 Add carrots, continue to cook: After 3 hours, add the carrots. Cover the pot and cook for 1 hour more, or until the carrots are cooked through and the brisket is falling-apart tender.

6 Remove brisket: When the brisket is falling-apart tender, take the pot out of the oven and remove the brisket to a cutting board. Cover it with foil. Pull out and discard the herbs.

7 Make sauce (optional): At this point you have two options. You can serve as is, or you can make a sauce with the drippings and some of the onions. If you serve as is, skip this step.

To make a sauce, remove the carrots and half of the onions, set aside and cover them with foil. Pour the ingredients that are remaining into a blender, and purée until smooth. If you want, add 1 tablespoon of mustard to the mix. Put into a small pot and keep warm.

8 Slice and serve: Notice the lines of the muscle fibers of the roast. This is the “grain” of the meat. Slice the meat perpendicular to these lines, or across the grain (cutting this way further tenderizes the meat), in 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch slices. (A sturdy bread knife works great for slicing roasts.)

Serve with the onions, carrots and gravy. Serve with mashed, roasted or boiled potatoes, egg noodles, or polenta.

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11 Sep

It seems each year European wines show up on retail shelves in my part of the country costing a little more than the year before, so what would happen if President Trump goes through with his twice-threatened tariff increase on French wines? 

The President threatened tariff increases on French wine in November, 2018 and threatened again this past July. His July threat was in response to France’s April, 2019 announcement of a National Assembly vote to establish a special tax aimed at technology giants. The tax would apply to ad revenues, commissions received by digital platforms and revenue from personal data resales. 

The President says tariffs are easy. If he’s talking about on-average tariff on bottles of US wine imported in France he is correct. But he is not exactly correct when he says France charges the high tariff on US wines.

According to Florine Livat, Associate Professor of Economics, Kedge Business School and Bradley Rickard, Associate Professor of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, the European Union (EU) sets the tariffs on wine in accordance with the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) attempt to keep agricultural tariffs low. Since the US is also a WTO member, France would have a valid complaint if President Trump targeted its wines for a tariff increase. EU authorities might have to respond and the result might be increased tariffs on all wines exported and imported between EU members and the US.

Livat and Rickard engaged in a deep look at the subject of wine tariffs—how they work, who benefits from them and who loses; their findings were published in the academic journal, The Conversation. According to the research, “Any change in tariffs between the US and the EU has the capacity to affect trade and will lead to changes in welfare among stakeholders in this sector [wine].”

Talking wine tariffs is talking big money. Livat and Rickard say that in 2018, EU wine exports to the US totaled more than $6 billion, representing 27% of all wine imports in the US. They say their research suggests that just a modest increase in US wine tariffs would increase US wine producer profits over time–it would reduce US consumer incentive to buy EU wines.

A Livat and Rickard chart shows the sparkling wine tariff in EU countries is 35 cents/liter; the US tariff is 19 cents/liter. For still wines, the EU applies five separate levels of tariff, based on alcohol by volume; the average across the five levels is 15 cents/liter. The US tariff is broken in two: under 14% alcohol is 6 cents/liter; over 14% is 16 cents/liter, which would average 11 cents/liter of bottled wine, but the majority of wines are under 14%.

To make it more complicated, the EU charges five separate levels of tariff on bulk wine, too, for an average of .08 cents/liter. The US tariff applied to under 14% alcohol in bulk is 14 cents/liter and over 14% it is 22 cents/liter.

If the tariff on EU wine is increased, the US government would reap a short-term revenue benefit, while the cost to import wines into the US will fall on EU exporters, US importers, and US consumers. The research shows the scenario does increase US wine producer short-term profits.

Yet another complication is that the US isn’t the only market for EU wines. China today imports more EU wine than US wine, and much of it is French. If French exporters turn to China to increase exports, Livat and Rickard says, “the indirect effect of losing out a wine market to China could have much bigger consequences for US producers in the long run.”

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07 Sep

This vegetable naan pizza is going to rock your weeknight. Or lunch. Or snack.

Here, creamy fontina, salty Parmesan, thin ribbons of zucchini and slivers of sweet red pepper get you started.

Once the pizza comes out of the oven, it’s crisp at the edges and chewy in the center. Top it with some greens, cherry tomatoes, and fresh herbs, and presto! You have pizza and salad all in one!

Naan, an Indian oval shaped flatbread, is perfect for pizza because it has just the right chewiness of good pizza dough. It can be transformed into individual pizzas in less than twenty minutes.

What??? Yes, it’s true. When you start with naan, which is miraculously similar to pre-cooked pizza dough, you can assemble a smashing homemade pizza while your oven preheats.

WHAT IS NAAN?

Naan is a flatbread made with yeast, flour, and water, and sometimes yogurt or milk. It is slightly thicker than pita bread, with a softer texture.

Traditionally it is made on a hot clay oven called a tandoor, and it puffs up irregularly when it bakes. It’s widely available in most grocery stores, or you can make it from scratch using this recipe:

Summer Vegetable Pizza How to Make Flatbread Pizza -Flatbread pizza made with Naan, vegetables, and greens on a cutting boardSummer Vegetable Pizza How to Make Flatbread Pizza -Flatbread pizza made with Naan, vegetables, and greens on a cutting board

HOW DO YOU MAKE ZUCCHINI RIBBONS?

Zucchini ribbons are perfect for this recipe. Although zucchini has a high water content, when thinly shaved and baked, the ribbons do not “weep” the way thicker slices might, and they soften quickly when baked on the pizza.

Look for small, young zucchini squash, since larger ones can be tough and watery and have big seeds. To make the ribbons, it’s easiest to use a Y peeler.

Start at the stem end and remove a wide lengthwise swathe of the outer green peel. Continue shaving off more ribbons until you reach the center seeds at the core. Turn it over and continue to peel off more ribbons.

Yellow and green zucchini add lots of color to your pizza.

Vegetarian Pizza - - flatbread pizza piled high with vegetables on a parchment paper with a wooden handled knife nearbyVegetarian Pizza - - flatbread pizza piled high with vegetables on a parchment paper with a wooden handled knife nearby

Vegetarian Pizza - - flatbread pizza piled high with vegetables on a parchment paper with a wooden handled knife nearbyVegetarian Pizza - - flatbread pizza piled high with vegetables on a parchment paper with a wooden handled knife nearby

WHAT GREENS GO WELL WITH THIS PIZZA?

I happen to love arugula because its slightly spicy flavor contrasts with the sweet peppers and rich, melty fontina in this pizza. You could also use spinach, soft greens like Bibb, butter, or Boston lettuce, or a mix of baby lettuces.

MORE PIZZA IDEAS

The sky is really the limit on these pizzas. You can make them to order one at a time for a snack or personalize them using whatever floats your boat! But don’t stop with this recipe, we have many more linked below! If you can imagine it, you can make it. And in record time.

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05 Sep

In its essence, a baked potato is a potato, baked.

As with all elemental things, though, the simplicity of a baked potato is deceptive. We’ve all had excellent baked potatoes and terrible baked potatoes. Happily, an excellent one is not any harder to make than a terrible one.

The right potato, the right temperature, and the right timing are key. There’s also some spirited jabbing with a fork involved. Get set to bake the best potatoes of your life!

START WITH THE RIGHT POTATO

Use russet potatoes for baking. They’re the big, tapered ones with dull brown skins. These are high-starch potatoes, and they work best for dry heat. That’s exactly the kind of heat your oven makes. It’s a match made in heaven!

High-moisture potatoes, like redskins or Yukon golds, are best for wet heat: steaming and boiling. They are lower in starch and remain dense after baking, which is not what you want in a baked potato.

How to Make a Baked Potato in the Oven - potatoes lined up showing sizesHow to Make a Baked Potato in the Oven - potatoes lined up showing sizes

BIG POTATOES AND SMALL POTATOES

Those giant russet potatoes marketed specifically for baking often weigh around an entire pound. This is a lot of potato. The ones that are the most realistic for serving as a side weigh 6 to 8 ounces.

If you want to split that baked potato open and load it up with substantial toppings (like broccoli or chili or pulled pork or salsa and guacamole and black beans…sigh), a 6 to 8 ounce potato might still be a good bet, because you’ll be adding to it to make a full meal.

In any case, the bigger the potato, the more time it takes to bake. Keep that in mind.

Oven Baked Potato Recipe - potatoes with forksOven Baked Potato Recipe - potatoes with forks

Oven Baked Potato Recipe - potatoes with forksOven Baked Potato Recipe - potatoes with forks

POKE TO PREVENT EXPLOSIONS

Do you want your potato to explode in the oven? No. More importantly, do you want it to taste great? Yes. Then jab it multiple times with a fork. Ten times per potato should do it. Potato-jabbing is cathartic. Enjoy yourself.

Much less dramatically, hole-poking gives you superior baked potatoes. According to the Idaho Potato Commission, potatoes are about 80 percent water. As your potatoes bake, some of that water converts to steam and exits through the tiny channels you poked in them. This moisture loss is a good thing. Outside of preventing explosions, it delivers lighter, fluffier baked potatoes.

TO OIL OR NOT TO OIL

Rubbing the potato with a little oil or grease before baking is, in my opinion, a good move. It makes the skin nice and crispy so you get a contrast between it and the steaming, starchy interior. The potatoes come out of the oven looking darker, shiny, and more appetizing than un-oiled ones.

Some sources say oiling the potato before baking seals in moisture, which is the opposite of what you want—you want the potato to vent off moisture. But we already poked it full of holes, remember?

TRY THIS! At my first-ever restaurant job, we dunked our potatoes in a vat of bacon grease, then coated them in tasty crumbs from the bottom of the crouton bin. They were heavenly. If you cook bacon, save that grease for your baked potatoes!

How to Make Baked Potatoes - russet potatoes being saltedHow to Make Baked Potatoes - russet potatoes being salted

How to Make Baked Potatoes - russet potatoes being saltedHow to Make Baked Potatoes - russet potatoes being salted

WHEN AND WHERE TO SALT

I am all in favor of salting potato skins: salt makes potato skins taste great.

Salt will stick to a greased potato better than a dry potato, but some will still fall off. That’s just the name of the game.

That salt on the skin won’t season the interior of the potato one lick, so remember to salt it up good once it’s on your plate and split open.

SKIP THE FOIL

Wrapping a potato in foil before baking will trap steam inside, resulting in dense, gluey flesh. Potatoes already have a perfectly fine wrapper: their skins. And you can eat them! So skip the foil before baking. It’s an extra step that makes not-as-good potatoes.

How to Make Baked Potatoes -- salted potatoes on a baking sheet in the ovenHow to Make Baked Potatoes -- salted potatoes on a baking sheet in the oven

How to Make Baked Potatoes -- salted potatoes on a baking sheet in the ovenHow to Make Baked Potatoes -- salted potatoes on a baking sheet in the oven

HOW LONG TO BAKE A POTATO?

How long does it take to bake a potato? It depends. The short answer is: It’s not fast!

Expect baked potatoes to take anywhere from 35 to 55 minutes, or over an hour if you are using giant honking mega-potatoes. The baking time depends on the size of the potato.

WHAT’S THE BEST TEMPERATURE FOR BAKED POTATOES?

Not too hot, not too cool. We like 400° Fahrenheit best.

Baked Potato Recipe - salted potatoes on a baking sheet with a fork stuck in it.Baked Potato Recipe - salted potatoes on a baking sheet with a fork stuck in it.

Baked Potato Recipe - salted potatoes on a baking sheet with a fork stuck in it.Baked Potato Recipe - salted potatoes on a baking sheet with a fork stuck in it.

WHEN IS IT DONE?

Gauging a baked potato’s doneness can be tricky. Because they come in so many sizes, you’re best relying on how it looks, smells, and feels, rather than a timer (but still set a timer so you remember to check on them). Here are some tips:

  • Fully baked potatoes will have slightly wrinkled skins.
  • They may make tiny hissing sounds, if you listen carefully.
  • If you lightly squeeze a potato, it should yield to the pressure of your fingers, and possibly even crack open a little.
  • You should be able to slide a fork or skewer deeply into the potato with minimal resistance.

If you are still feeling unsure, use an instant-read thermometer: their internal temperature should be between 208°F and 211°F. (In this magic temperature zone, starch granules in the potato have absorbed water, ruptured, and rendered the interior flesh fluffy and light.)

OPEN UP FOR SERVING

Get that hot potato on a plate and open it up. For a fluffy, craggy interior that’ll absorb toppings like butter, sour cream, or chili, don’t cut the potato open with a knife. Split it open with a fork. This gives you crumbly, flour-y flesh and more surface area.

How to Bake a Potato -- 3 potatoes split open with butterHow to Bake a Potato -- 3 potatoes split open with butter

How to Bake a Potato -- 3 potatoes split open with butterHow to Bake a Potato -- 3 potatoes split open with butter

BAKING POTATOES IN ADVANCE

Thousands of steakhouses across America bake potatoes well in advance of serving them. These potatoes are not as amazing as ones straight from the oven, but they are pretty good.

However, after being kept hot for more than an hour, baked potatoes will get very wrinkly skins, their interiors will collapse and become dense, and the flesh under the skin will turn brown. If you want great baked potatoes, don’t make them more than an hour in advance.

To keep fully baked potatoes hot, wrap them in foil (I know we were carping on foil earlier, but this is foil after the potato’s fully baked). It’s best to wear an oven mitt when you do this. Then pop the wrapped potato in one of the following options.

  • An Instant Pot or other electric pressure cooker on its “keep warm” setting.
  • A slow cooker on the lowest setting.
  • A small cooler that’s been warmed with hot water, then emptied out.
  • A regular oven on the lowest setting (ideally “warm”).

LEFTOVER POTATOES

I often bake a few more potatoes than I need. They become building blocks for future meals: hash, gnocchi, loaded potato skins, twice baked potatoes, improvised baked potato soup.

Let leftover potatoes cool, then wrap them in foil and refrigerate them for up to 4 days. Baked potatoes do not freeze well.

GOT LEFTOVER POTATOES? USE ‘EM UP!

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