16 Jun



Packed with pineapple and coconut, this Pineapple Coconut Curry Loaf will give you a taste of the tropics. Curry powder complements the sweetness of the pineapple, while also infusing this loaf with a kick of sweet spice.

Pineapple Coconut Curry Loaf

  • ½ cup (113 grams) unsalted butter
  • 1 cup (276 grams) crushed pineapple, drained
  • ⅓ cup (80 grams) sour cream
  • 1 cup (200 grams) granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs (100 grams)
  • 1 teaspoon (3 grams) kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon (2 grams) curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon (4 grams) vanilla extract
  • 2¼ cups (281 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons (10 grams) baking powder
  • 1⅓ cup (112 grams) sweetened flaked coconut, divided
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Butter and flour a 9×5-inch loaf pan; line pan with parchment paper.
  2. In a large glass bowl, microwave butter on high until melted, about 45 seconds. Whisk in pineapple and sour cream. (This will cool the butter before adding the eggs.) Add sugar, eggs, salt, curry powder, and vanilla, whisking until smooth. Add flour and baking powder, stirring until combined. Stir in 1 cup (84 grams) coconut. Pour batter into prepared pan. Sprinkle with remaining ⅓ cup (28 grams) coconut.
  3. Bake for 30 minutes. Lightly cover with foil, and bake until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, about 25 minutes more. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes. Remove from pan, and let cool completely on a wire rack.

PRO TIP
Since you don’t mix the dry ingredients, layer the dry ingredients on top of the wet ingredients, and then stir to combine.

3.5.3251

 






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16 Jun

This month, we welcome back Marta Rivera for more of her meal plans. Marta is a trained chef, mom of twins, and wife to a newly-retired soldier!

I’m looking forward to spoiling my husband this week! He’s celebrating his birthday on Wednesday, so I’m starting the week with one of his favorite meals: fajitas! They’re easy to make on a sheet pan, and because they’re low in carbs (and neither of us are “low” in much of anything), I feel better about watching him indulge.

Throughout the week, I’m sticking with the meals that appeal to his love of contrasting flavors and comfort foods. Many of these dishes will be doubled and frozen for those lazy summer days ahead.

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16 Jun

A rose of unknown varietal origin, but hailing from Napa. Quite strawberry-heavy up front, the wine quickly takes a right turn into thick floral notes, a veritable thicket of lilac and honeysuckle. From there, the wine develops a distinct and surprising rosemary character, a pungent herbaceous quality that evokes a light vermouth. It’s crazy out of place in a rose called “Bread and Butter,” but it also gives the wine a surprisingly enchanting twist.

B+ / $12 / breadandbutterwines.com

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2018 Bread & Butter Rose

$12

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16 Jun

“The Petite Masters” Panel & Tasting Reception, hosted by P.S. I Love You, a historic journey with the American heritage grape Petite Sirah, and the top taste makers from Napa, Sonoma, and beyond.  

Discover Petite Sirah’s extraordinary journey to America and how the formidable pioneer forged a cornerstone in America’s rich wine history. Today, this all-American varietal is a grape on the move and trending in popularity among winemakers and savvy consumers alike. Enjoy a fascinating and informative roundtable tasting with notable winemakers specializing in premium Petite Sirah.

You’ll hear from top taste-makers, including George Urquiola of Robert Biale Vineyards, Stephanie Douglas of Aratas Wine, Randle Johnson of The Hess Collection and Artezin Wines, Julie Johnson of Tres Sabores Winery, and Miro Tcholakov of Miro Cellars and Trentadue Winery. These panelists will be joined by other Napa Valley producers to share why they are passionate about producing Petite Sirah.

Following an informative conversation, you’ll have the opportunity to sample stylistic Petite Sirah from 20 California producers. The wines will be paired with gourmet bites from CIA chefs.

P.S. I Love You is a non-profit organization whose mission is to promote, educate, and legitimize Petite Sirah as a heritage variety, with a special emphasis on its terroir uniqueness.

Participating Wineries:

 


 

TICKETS: Admission for this event is $65. Tickets are limited with advance purchase suggested. This event is for guests 21+ only.

WILL CALL: Will Call will be located through the main entrance in our atrium.

FOOD & BEVERAGE: Tickets are all-inclusive of food and beverage. You must be 21 or over to purchase and consume alcohol. We do not allow outside food or beverages.

PARKING: There is parking in the lot directly outside The CIA at Copia as well as across the street, but the lots can get crowded. Plan to arrive early or carpool. Uber and Lyft are good options too!

CELEBRATE: We host a variety of public events throughout the year. See what’s coming up next!



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16 Jun

Kaja Beauty Shimmer & Matte Beauty Bento Eyeshadow Trios ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) are new for summer! Each trio contains two matte eyeshadows and one shimmer shade, which is in contrast to their original, all-shimmer trios. It’s a pleasure to report that all four trios performed well, and they performed consistently with the original shimmer-only trios!  The mattes were incredibly silky and smooth but weren’t powdery or prone to fallout, which ensured they maintained pigmentation but were still blendable.  The shimmers were sparkly with a more emollient feel to the touch, and they had good adhesion with minimal fallout. I really love this line of trios!

01.

01.
Poppy Champagne
Kaja

Kaja

PPermanent. $21.00/0.09 oz.

A

Kaja Poppy Champagne Beauty Bento Bouncy Shimmer Eyeshadow Trio ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) features a bright, sparkling yellow, lighter orange, and deeper…

Read Review
View Swatches
View Dupes

Kaja Poppy Champagne Beauty Bento Bouncy Shimmer Eyeshadow Trio ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) features a bright, sparkling yellow, lighter orange, and deeper…

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02.

02.
Glowing Guava
Kaja

Kaja

PPermanent. $21.00/0.09 oz.

A

Kaja Glowing Guava Beauty Bento Bouncy Shimmer Eyeshadow Trio ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) includes two matte shades with a pop of shimmer. The curated trio…

Read Review
View Swatches
View Dupes

Kaja Glowing Guava Beauty Bento Bouncy Shimmer Eyeshadow Trio ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) includes two matte shades with a pop of shimmer. The curated trio…

Read Review
View Swatches
View Dupes
03.

03.
Chocolate Dahlia
Kaja

Kaja

PPermanent. $21.00/0.09 oz.

A

Kaja Chocoalte Dahlia Beauty Bento Bouncy Shimmer Eyeshadow Trio ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) is a new, neutral-hued trio that features two matte browns…

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View Swatches
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Kaja Chocoalte Dahlia Beauty Bento Bouncy Shimmer Eyeshadow Trio ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) is a new, neutral-hued trio that features two matte browns…

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04.

04.
Hella Azalea
Kaja

Kaja

PPermanent. $21.00/0.09 oz.

B+

Kaja Hella Azalea Beauty Bento Bouncy Shimmer Eyeshadow Trio ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) is a new trio that features a sparkling pink, matte pink, and matte…

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Kaja Hella Azalea Beauty Bento Bouncy Shimmer Eyeshadow Trio ($21.00 for 0.09 oz.) is a new trio that features a sparkling pink, matte pink, and matte…

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Side-by-Side Swatches

Glossover Breakdown

92%

Average Score

A
3
B
1
C
0
D
0
F
0
Glossover Averages
product
9.5
pigmentation
9.5
texture
9.5
longevity
8.5
application
5
Total
92%
product
9.5
pigmentation
9.5
texture
9.5
longevity
8.5
application
5
Total
92%

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16 Jun

 

In meditation we sit and let life unfold from moment to moment without any interaction. This can be considered not having a problem with anything, or letting things be, or being in the moment. Regardless of what you call it, the practice is one of allowing whatever shows up to show up.

I often hear people complain of “distractions” – the ticking of a clock, or the conversation out the door, or an itch on their leg. Whatever arises during meditation, whether gradual or sudden, blaring or faint, pleasant or distasteful, if we can consider these stimuli as part of the greater whole of this moment, then the idea of a “distraction” loses its footing.

When we witness the full moment, these sensations have a context to be taken in. As we allow them to be there instead of shying away from them, we are taking in this moment exactly how it is. We are witnessing this moment truly and authentically, not cherry-picking which sensations we want to experience and which we do not.

This is the basic approach to meditation. Whatever shows up we acknowledge without any issue. This instruction is about us receiving stimuli, energy flowing towards us.

But what about when energy moves in the other direction? What about when we wish to express ourselves to the world?

Guards Work Both Ways

In meditation, we drop our guards, let go of habituated tension, and allow ourselves to simply be..

These guards that we drop work both ways. Not only do they inhibit us from fully experiencing this moment, they prevent us from fully and clearly expressing ourselves.

The more we practice dropping our conditioned guards and experience life fully in meditation, we can practice dropping them when we go to communicate.

Accept the Moment

As we learn to accept the moment as it is, we learn to accept ourselves as we are.

As we learn that the “distractions” that show up in our practice are part of a deeper whole, we learn that our emotional issues and mental traps are part of the deeper whole of who we are.

As we practice connecting with the deeper whole, the more clearly we connect with the deepest version of who we are, and can express ourselves from that place.

Meditation is often considered a practice for us to help learn how to deal with life. Yet it also can help us be authentically who we are as we communicate to others.

As we practice getting out of our own way of experiencing things outside of us, we are practicing getting out of our own way to experience and express what is happening within us.

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16 Jun

ONALASKA, Wis. (WXOW) – Over 800 people gathered at the American Legion during Onalaska Community Days to spread awareness about mental health.

The Warrior Walk is hosted by the YMCA Veteran Community and is a 2.2 mile trek to shed light on veterans who have taken their own lives. That 2.2 mile distance symbolizes the 22 veterans that die from suicide each day in our country.

“So the biggest thing that we’re trying to accomplish is to try to bring awareness to different mental health needs in the community and we’re kinda highlighting the veterans mental health needs, but as well as anyone who is suffering from mental health,” YMCA Wellness Director Christopher Matt said. “Making it more normal for people to talk about people that have needs or if you do have needs to know that there’s resources out there for you.”

Health professionals were available in bright green for support and the event also featured several fired shots in honor of warriors who are no longer with us.

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16 Jun

It can be difficult to categorize a Carlos Reygadas film as simply “good” or “bad.” The director and the films themselves seem extremely disinterested in questions of easy adoration or dismissal and extremely interested in inviting viewers into a different kind of experience, one of durational and emotional testing. Reygadas’ characters are often in messy situations and, instead of offering clean narratives through the mess, he lets the mess sit, stagnant on the surface but bubbling beneath, and asks audiences to also spend time (and a good amount of time) in the muck.

Our Time, Reygadas’ sixth feature film, falls in line with these expected features, and it will not be for all tastes. The film’s running time in and of itself, nearly three hours, will be enough to turn off some, and the fact that much of that time is spent meandering through a marriage in various states of existential crisis, might turn off more. But for those with the stamina for investigating bad behavior, particularly masculinity in its various shades of emotional and physical violence, will find much to mine.

Reygadas has cast himself and his real-life wife Natalia López as Juan and Esther, a couple in an open marriage who run a fighting bull ranch in rural Mexico. They split duties, her mostly running the ranch’s daily activities and him selecting and raising the animals. Juan is also a renowned poet attempting to balance his creative passions and his practical duties. Few of these establishing facts are explained, with Reygadas characteristically allowing dialogue and imagery to swirl, trusting viewers to glean information from simply watching and listening to the quotidien moments in the first few scenes.

In fact, it takes a while to understand who the main characters are and what the main story is. As in other films, Reygadas opens the film with a long collection of scenes featuring many characters who will never be seen again, namely children and teenagers, all playing various innocent and not-so-innocent games in the muddy ponds and desolate grounds surrounding the ranch. It seems Reygadas wants viewers to delve into what games, particularly games between people who would pursue physical touch with one another, mean, how we manipulate and control the rules, and how we punish one another in animalistic ways when things don’t go our way.

Animals feature prominently throughout the film, all layering on meaning as the winding plot unspools (and though the credits make clear that no animals were harmed in the making of the film, sensitive viewers should take note that the depicted violence against and between animals is incredibly visceral and upsetting). Though Juan and Esther have agreed to their open marriage, Juan is driven to jealous extremes when Esther beds Phil (Phil Burgers), an American horse breaker. The facts that Juan raises fighting bulls and that Phil breaks horses, and that the two go head-to-head in a swaggering battle for Esther’s attention, might seem a bit on the nose. But this combination is also effective. The images of animals in various states of violent interaction juxtaposed with Juan and Phil’s initially human but increasingly beastly treatment of one another adds much-needed poetry to a story that might end up too tediously toxic without such artful commentary.

After Juan realizes how close Esther and Phil are growing, his behavior turns increasingly erratic. He insists that his real problem with the affair is that Esther didn’t tell him about its genesis from the start, but as Esther asserts more agency, it becomes clearer that a lack of control over her is Juan’s main issue. At times, it seems even Juan believes his own actions to be outlandish, but he still disappears into a kind of masculine madness, until it actually seems that, instead of Phil cuckolding him, Juan might just be cuckolding himself. Such is the danger of toxic masculinity, deaf to the nuances of emotion and empathy, and hellbent on grabbing back a sense of power, no matter how fallible and fragile, no matter the devastating consequences.

Reygadas refuses to afford his characters an easy way out, and as the film ends, the lack of resolution will be as vexatious to some viewers as Juan’s own siloed shame and sadness. Breathtaking photography and sound design, often in scenes depicting violence among bulls (and in one instance an ill-fated mule), add to the disorienting beastliness that envelops all three main characters, leaving viewers to ponder what separates the human ego from the animal ego, or whether, especially when it comes to lust and love, there is any difference at all.

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16 Jun

The Japanese translation of Starting Strength was recently published in Japan. We have been generously provided with an English translation of the foreword prepared for that audience to share with you.

This is the Japanese translation of Starting Strength by Mr. Mark Rippetoe. The first time I had my hands on the original book dates back to 2005, although it has since received updates and what we have now is the third edition. It was a recommendation from my professor when I was studying in the US, and as I began reading it, I immediately noticed the great value of the book. There is no other book in existence that describes how to perform strength training in such a detailed, logical, and nerdy manner (in a good way). I feel firsthand that reading Starting Strength greatly deepened my knowledge and understanding of strength training.

I have been recommending Starting Strength to any friends and other coaches who asked me for a book recommendation on strength training. However, responses to the effect of “Oh, I can’t read English.” and “Only if there was a Japanese version of it.” Have been all too common. The fact that it is written in English has proven to be a barrier, preventing the teachings of Starting Strength from spreading in Japan. I’ve always felt that it was unfortunate.

I had a feeling resembling relief when I first heard the news that Starting Strength was finally going to be translated into Japanese after more than 10 years since the first edition of the original book was published. It is a great honor that I have the opportunity to write the foreword to this Japanese version. As someone who has been a long-term reader of the original book, I would like to share my thoughts on what makes Starting Strength so unique.


Many a book on strength training has been published. Some books describe how to perform strength training exercises but most books only have instructions spread over a couple of facing pages per exercise. For relatively simple single-joint exercises like the leg extension and the side raise, perhaps those meager instructions are enough to show how to perform them. However, when it comes to complex multi-joint exercises done with free weights like the squat and deadlift, it is virtually impossible to understand and acquire the proper techniques by reading a couple of pages of instructions only. Attempting to squat or deadlift with such shallow levels of knowledge and understanding, as would be based on those two-page descriptions alone, would not produce the desired training effects and could even lead to greater risk of pain or injury.

In contrast to books covering countless exercises with these two-page instructions, the most unique feature of Starting Strength is that it mainly focuses on five barbell exercises; the squat, the press, the deadlift, the bench press and the power clean with detailed descriptions extending over tens of pages for each exercise. There is no other book that dedicates this many pages to individual exercises.

The fact that Starting Strength only features five exercises may seem unsatisfying to some people who are used to reading training-related books that cover tens of exercises. (Although Starting Strength actually has some assistance exercises in addition to the five main exercises.) However, these five exercises have great abilities to build strength because they involve a lot of muscle groups to lift heavy weights through long ranges of motion. It is far more likely that you will achieve the goal of gaining strength by focusing on the five exercises described in Starting Strength than if you go through the tens of exercises in those training-related books that are commonly available.

press japanese starting strength

Starting Strength teaches you how to perform the exercises in great detail, but it also explains, based on knowledge in biomechanics and anatomy, why to perform the exercises in the ways described in the book. For readers who are in the position of teaching strength training, understanding the whys in addition to the hows will enable them to teach the hows more effectively and more confidently. For readers performing these exercises, understanding the whys will enable them to be more attentive to proper techniques (= the hows) and to train more effectively. Understanding the whys will lead to more confidence in the method, which should then lead to greater motivation to train.

Such detailed explanations of the whys are one of the unique features of Starting Strength that other training-related books do not offer. Reading it all will probably be a surprising and a ground-breaking experience to many readers as they probably will not have thought as deeply as presented in the book about how to perform the exercises and the reasoning behind it.

In addition to how to perform the aforementioned five exercises, Starting Strength offers advice on how to move forward with your training using these exercises. In particular, it provides a program specifically designed for novices who are new to strength training.

This program for novices is very simple. It mainly consists of the five exercises featured in the book with only two other additional exercises; the chin-up and the back extension. Most exercises are done for 3 sets of 5 reps with the exception of the deadlift being 1 set of 5 reps. The load is increased by 2.5kg or 5kg after each training session and this progression is supposed to be used until it’s no longer possible to do so. Unlike strategies commonly referred to as periodization, there is no change periodically made to the exercise selection, volume (≒ total reps) or intensity of load (≒ weight lifted) over time.

Because it is so simple, some readers might wonder if such a simple program can really be effective. However, focusing on just a few exercises that are actually important will definitely improve strength more at the novice stage than trying many different exercises. And because novices will gain strength relatively quickly, simply adding 2.5~5kg at each session rather than fiddling around with the set × rep scheme will be the more efficient path to strength gains. I can attest to this based on my experience of coaching athletes of many different levels, and the book also explains why this is the case.

The novice program laid out in this book is indeed simple, but because it’s simple, it is highly effective. There is no need to be concerned about its simplicity. There is no need to add more exercises or change the numbers of sets or reps to perform. I would recommend the readers to do the program exactly as it is designed if they want to maximize the efficacy of the program.

In addition to the novice program, the book provides additional explanations for things like how to program warmup sets and work sets, how to increase weight, and what to do when strength plateaus occur.

Practical information on these topics will be necessary when implementing strength training programs written on paper. Commonly available training-related books typically just tell you something like “Squat 3 sets of 5” and don’t provide practical advice on whether to use the same weight across the sets or increase weight each set, or at what point to increase weight when the weight you’re currently lifting starts to feel easy.

In contrast, Starting Strength provides a wide range of practical knowledge on the premise that the readers will implement what they read in the book. The fact that Mr. Mark Rippetoe regularly coaches members of the gym he owns is probably a major contributing factor to this aspect of the book. What you read in Starting Strength is not an empty theory on paper; it is actually useful in real life. This is a major strength of this book.

With all these features, Starting Strength is a very unique book. There is no other book like Starting Strength. I am excited about this Japanese version being published and Starting Strength becoming accessible to many more people. Just like Starting Strength deepened my knowledge and understanding of strength training, I am looking forward to seeing this Japanese version improve the knowledge and understanding of the entire training industry in the country.


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