Eating Disorders // Category

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13 Jun

It is a big decision to enter inpatient or residential eating disorder treatment, but it can be instrumental in your healing and recovery. It is crucial to know the right questions to ask when investigating treatment programs.

Here are 10 critical questions to ask to help guide you in your decision:

1. What is the program’s accreditation?

It is reassuring to know that the eating disorder treatment field has set high standards for effective treatment. You will want to investigate if the program has CACREP, JCAHO or other forms of accreditation. These agencies conduct an extensive investigation to determine the suitability and quality of a treatment program.

2. Does the eating disorder treatment program accept my insurance or payment method?

Unfortunately, it is hard to find free treatment, but more and more programs are participating with insurance. Be sure to call your insurance company and inquire about what your behavioral health benefits are, specific eating disorder treatment insurance benefits, which programs may be in-network with your plan, and what your deductible is.

Also, speak with the eating disorder treatment program’s finance department to determine your payment options and clearly understand the costs of care.

3. Where are your locations?

Some anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder treatment programs offer locations in multiple cities and states. Determine if you are willing to travel for treatment. If so, how far are you willing to go? Are you prepared to participate in an out-of-state treatment program if it is a good fit for your specific needs and desires or would it be the best use of your resources to stay close to home and to your support network?

Sheppard Pratt Banner promoting knowing the right questions to ask in ED Treatment
4. Are you able to treat my co-occurring issue?

Most individuals with eating disorders also have other co-occurring diagnoses such as anxiety, depression, PTSD, substance abuse or OCD that can impact the recovery process. It is imperative that the program you choose is able to address all of the contributing factors to your eating disorder.

Inquire how dual diagnosis and other issues are addressed within the program. Do they have specialized programming for dual diagnoses? Ask for specific details about how they treat all the behavioral health issues you are facing.

5. How many individual and group counseling sessions will I receive and what are the providers’ credentials?

The program’s quality of individualized care will be revealed by this question. You are paying to work with highly trained eating disorder treatment professionals, and there should be extensive individual and group counseling offered.

All psychiatrists should be board-certified and all therapists licensed in their fields. Additionally, there should be regular nutrition counseling and guidance from registered dietitians, access to internists, registered nurses and other specialists.

A strong family therapy component facilitated by licensed therapists should be included for all adolescents and offered for all adults.

6. Does the bulimia, anorexia or binge eating disorder program allow visitors?

Woman suffering from stress and anxietyDetermine who can visit you and what days/hours are set aside for visitors. You will be busy with treatment most of the time. However, it is very nice to be able to reconnect with loved ones throughout your time in treatment.

If you are a parent or caregiver entering treatment, it may be very helpful for your children to be able to visit with you, see you, hug you and know that you are okay. This may lessen the impact of your absence for little ones.

Regardless of age or circumstance, it can make a big difference to be in a program that is accessible to your friends and loved ones. This allows them to visit you and take part in family sessions, workshops, caregiver support groups or other resources that can help them learn more about how to help.

7. What is your Aftercare Program?

There is no quick fix when it comes to recovering from an eating disorder. You will absolutely need and want aftercare. Does the program offer comprehensive care? Determine if step down care is available – such as partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient and ongoing outpatient support.

Also, be sure to ask the program to communicate with your pre-existing treatment team, if one exists.

8. What is your philosophy on special dietary needs?

If you require kosher meals or have other dietary needs, you will need to determine if the program is able to meet them.

Remember, though, that you are seeking treatment for an eating disorder. Some dietary preferences (outside of religious or medical needs) can actually interfere with evidence-based care. The nutrition specialists in these eating disorder treatment programs may know more than you do about how to work towards positive treatment outcomes. Even if you are devoted to your diet rules, it might be wise to consider alternative suggestions for your diet while in treatment.

9. Will I be allowed telephone and internet access?

Woman considering the right questions to ask for ED treatmentIn our high-tech age, we are seemingly never without our phones and have constant access to our friends, families and social media.

Will it be an issue for you if the eating disorder program limits your access to your phone or computer?

If so, are you willing to make some sacrifices in internet and phone access to comply with the program?

Because accredited programs comply with privacy and confidentiality regulations, many of them limit access to handheld phones and other devices with cameras as a way of protecting your privacy and ensuring the therapeutic space remains safe.

10. Is the treatment you provide evidence-based and backed by research?

This is important because there are studies demonstrating the effectiveness of some common eating disorder treatment therapies and others with very little evidence. You will want to look for a program that provides therapies, like those below, that have the best possible patient outcomes:

  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT)
  • Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)
  • Family Based Therapy (FBT)
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

This is not an exhaustive list of questions, but a great starting point to guide you in interviewing the treatment program. Many other valid questions will come to mind, and you certainly want to ask these, too.

Effective inpatient eating disorder treatment can be life-changing and lay the groundwork for your recovery. Take the time and know the questions to ask to determine if the program is the best fit for you.

Your life may very well depend on it.


Sources:

1. (n.d.). Retrieved June 12, 2019, from https://www.jointcommission.org/accreditation/behavioral_health_care.aspx

2. Why Attend an Accredited Program? (n.d.). Retrieved June 12, 2019, from https://www.cacrep.org/


About the author:

Jacquelyn EkernJacquelyn Ekern, MS, LPC founded Eating Disorder Hope in 2005, driven by a profound desire to help those struggling with anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating disorder. This passion resulted from her battle with, and recovery from, an eating disorder. As president, Jacquelyn manages Ekern Enterprises, Inc. and the Eating Disorder Hope website. In addition, she is a fully licensed therapist with a closed private counseling practice specializing in the treatment of eating disorders.

Jacquelyn has a Bachelor of Science in Human Services degree from The University of Phoenix and a Masters degree in Counseling/Psychology, from Capella University. She has extensive experience in the eating disorder field including advanced education in psychology, participation, and contributions to additional eating disorder groups, symposiums, and professional associations. She is a member of the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA), Academy of Eating Disorders (AED), the Eating Disorders Coalition (EDC) and the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp).

Jacquelyn enjoys art, working out, walking her dogs, reading, painting and time with family.
Although Eating Disorder Hope was founded by Jacquelyn Ekern, this organization would not be possible without support from our generous sponsors.


The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt

The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt has been a national leader in the provision of eating disorder treatment for more than 25 years. While rooted in extensive experience, our programs continuously evolve to integrate the latest research and evidence-based practices including a strong cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) component and high levels of family involvement. Interdisciplinary treatment teams provide specialized care for children, adolescents, and adults with eating disorders, both male and female.

The Center’s full continuum of care includes age-specific Inpatient Programs and 12-hour/day Partial Hospital Programs, evening Intensive Outpatient Program, comprehensive outpatient services, free support groups and collaborative care workshops for caregivers. The Center offers extensive individual, group and family therapies, including Family-Based Treatment (FBT), as well as nutritional counseling, art therapy, and occupational therapy. Our holistic approach actively addresses common co-occurring illnesses including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, substance abuse, and PTSD. The Center is in-network with most major insurance plans.

855-825-1067
[email protected]
www.EatingDisorder.org

The Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt is an Honorary Patron of Eating Disorder Hope – Helping to make our work possible!


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective of eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Reviewed & Approved on June 13, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern MS, LPC
Published June 13, 2019, on EatingDisorderHope.com


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13 Jun

Eating disorders can cause serious health problems, especially in children and teenagers who are in the early stages of development, both mentally and physically. This is why early intervention is so crucial.

“Research on treatments for eating disorders, as well as most mental health problems in general, indicates that early identification and treatment improves the speed of recovery, reduces symptoms to a greater extent and improves the likelihood of staying free of the illness [1].”

If you notice your child is engaging in any of the following behaviors, early intervention might be needed as it may be worth taking a closer look at their relationship with food and their body.

1. Does your child have beliefs about food that are not accurate, induce fear and/or anxiety, or cause your child to avoid specific food(s) altogether?

2. Does your child make negative, self-critical comments about their body?

3. Do these beliefs prevent your child from wearing the clothes they want or prevent them from enjoying shopping for new clothes or being out in public?

4. Does your child disappear after eating?

5. Does your child immediately use the bathroom after eating?

6. Does your child frequently claim they have “already eaten”?

7. Do you see your child eating throughout the day?

While these are just a few potential signs that your child is struggling with disordered eating or an eating disorder, the symptoms are not limited to this list alone. Early intervention and seeking professional advice may be needed.


References:

[1] Lock, Agras, Bryson, & Kraemer, 2005; Loeb et al., 2007; Russell, George, Dare, & Eisler, 1987; Treasure & Russell, 2011.


About the Author:

Michelle Evans Headshot - 718x712Michelle Evans, LPC, NCC, CEDS-S

The Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program at EDCare Colorado Springs is under the guidance of Program Coordinator Michelle Evans.

Michelle is a certified eating disorder specialist supervisor, with over 10 years of experience working with eating disorders, self-harm, anxiety, and OCD. With a passion for working with adolescent patients and their families, Michelle’s combines her knowledge and caring nature to help families achieve lasting recovery together.


Thank You to Our Sponsor

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What Makes EDCare’s Adolescent Evening Intensive Outpatient Program (AIOP) Different? EDCare’s Adolescent Intensive Outpatient Program is specifically designed to treat teenagers, ages 14-17, who are struggling with an eating disorder and other co-morbid diagnoses.

Caregivers are an integral part of their loved one’s treatment plan and are highly encouraged to participate in the program on a weekly basis. Exposing them to education on a variety of topics increases their confidence and competence, in helping their loved one achieve a full recovery.

Therapy sessions are not only focused on supporting and educating families but also helping them learn how to navigate specific scenarios through problem-solving and establishing a behavioral plan to meet their families individual needs.

EDCare strives to provide the highest standard in quality care to families in and around the Colorado Springs community. EDCare strongly believes the family needs to be worked with and treated, as a unit, for long-term and sustainable recovery for the adolescent.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective on eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Published June 13, 2019, on EatingDisorderHope.com
Reviewed & Approved on June 13, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern MS, LPC


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12 Jun

If you read the name of this article and felt even an inkling of judgment for a parent who is struggling with the idea of do I give up on my child then this article is not for you.

This blog is intended for the parent who is tired, the parent who is heartbroken, who is burnt-out, and who is at their wit’s end.

This blog is for the parent who is feeling defeated and discouraged for their child, despite years-worth of effort.

Your Feelings of “Do I Give Up on My Child” are Valid

There are many negative, overwhelming feelings that can overtake you in your struggle. That’s right – you’re struggling.

Yes, your child is battling an ugly eating disorder. However, this disorder is also all-consuming, meaning, it overcomes the individual and their entire lives, including those in it.

Many parents who have a child with an eating disorder report experience perceived stress due to their caregiver status, also known as the “caregiving burden.”

Studies show that many parents of children with an eating disorder report having unmet practical and emotional needs as well as experiencing psychological distress and caregiver burden [1].

Your child is destroying themselves, and you have to watch, spending all of your time, money, and energy attempting to save them. No wonder you are fighting with the thoughts of how do I not give up on my child.

It isn’t easy, and it is okay if you are tired. It is okay if you feel at a loss. It is okay to question whether or not your help is doing your child any good.

It is okay to feel bitterness, resentment, frustration, or annoyance. It is okay to be overwhelmed and at your wit’s end. Your feelings, good and bad, are valid. Don’t get down on yourself because you are struggling with support and ask “should I give up on my child.”

You Are Not Alone

It may not always feel this way, but, trust that you are not the only parent who feels challenged and discouraged by their child’s eating disorder.

Just as your feelings are valid, they are worth expressing.

Picture of mom and daughter with mom fighting to not Give Up on My Child and her eating disorderI encourage you to reach out and more than likely, you will be surprised by the number of parents of children with an eating disorder that can help you feel seen and understood.

Your Effort Matters

I know that you feel downtrodden and that anything and everything you have done is not helping. Please believe that this effort makes a difference in your child’s chances of recovering from their eating disorder.

Numerous studies indicate that attachment and familial closeness is vital to the recovery process and can be a short-term predictor of recovery [1].

Further, parents of recovered adolescents report more closeness than those of non-recovered adolescents, indicating that the distance you may be feeling is normal but that it is not permanent [1].

Research also indicates that the more caregiver burden and distress experienced by a parent, the lower the likelihood of recovery for their child due to the family environment this creates [1].

You and your child can heal.

However, you must prioritize taking care of yourself. You cannot pour from an empty cup, and you don’t have to.


References:

[1] Nilsson, K., Engstrom, I., Hagglof, B. (2012). Family climate and recovery in adolescent onset eating disorders: a prospective study. European Eating Disorders Review, 20:1.


Image of Margot Rittenhouse.About the Author: 

Margot Rittenhouse, MS, PLPC, NCC is a therapist who is passionate about providing mental health support to all in need and has worked with clients with substance abuse issues, eating disorders, domestic violence victims, and offenders, and severely mentally ill youth.

As a freelance writer for Eating Disorder Hope and Addiction Hope and a mentor with MentorConnect, Margot is a passionate eating disorder advocate, committed to de-stigmatizing these illnesses while showing support for those struggling through mentoring, writing, and volunteering. Margot has a Master’s of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Johns Hopkins University.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective on eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Published June 17, 2019, on EatingDisorderHope.com
Reviewed & Approved on June 17, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern MS, LPC


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12 Jun

Amanda Schlitzer Tierney, MS, CSCS,  Riley Nickols, Ph.D., CEDS, Travis Stewart, MATS, LPC, NCC at The Victory Program at McCallum Place

Coaches, you play a vital role in the life of your athletes! Your words and actions have lasting meaning. While in this position of authority and influence, it is your responsibility to create a safe and supportive training environment, when developing your athletes.

Here are some guidelines to help you feel well-equipped to communicate with any athlete, especially individuals prone to struggles with disordered eating and exercise habits and/or athletes that have undergone eating disorder treatment and are in transition back into your sport environment and care.

Recommendations for Coaches – What to Avoid:

  • Do not give weight/body composition parameters to athletes (e.g., “You need to lose 10 pounds”)
  • Abstain from public weigh-ins or posting athletes’ weight, body composition and comparisons on training schedule, rankings and benchmarks.
  • Do not discuss calories or promote diets with your athletes.
  • Do not restrict what athletes “should” or “should not” eat (e.g., “Do not eat sugar before a match,” “You need to lose X pounds to weigh-in next week.”)
  • Don’t try to be the athlete’s savior or act as a therapist. Utilize the expertise of appropriate referrals to collaborate on care.
  • Don’t be afraid to contact eating disorder professionals to make a referral or consult on a case. You don’t need to have all of the answers!

Harmful Messages from Coaches (*Communicated by athletes with eating disorders):

  • Commenting on my weight, shape, appearance”
  • Comparing me to my teammates/other people in the class”
  • “The before and after weight loss competitions, between teammates, were triggering”
  • Touching me without asking”
  • “Giving mixed messages
  • “You look thin “or “You would be so much faster if you lost a few pounds”
  • Praising me for clocking extra hours at the gym”
  • “You look so fit, keep up the good work”
  • “Praising my rigid routines or obsessive nature”
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Recommendations for Coaches: What to Do:

  • Recognize the signs and symptoms of disordered eating and relative energy deficiency
  • Advocate that your athlete trains and competes at a weight that is individualized and optimal to sustain health and well-being.
  • Be aware of risks associated with allowing an athlete to train and compete when in a state of energy deficiency
  • Understand that high performance in sport does not always indicate good health
  • Performance may not decline immediately after unhealthy changes in weight, nutrition, exercise behaviors
  • Focus on developing an athletes’ athletic skills, mental toughness and resilience, reaction time, agility, balance, knowledge of the game, how to navigate imperfect sport situations, etc.
  • Understand the misperception that leanness equates to performance improvements in sport
  • Collaborate with eating disorder professionals, athletic trainer, strength and conditioning coach, physician, sports dietitian to set appropriate limits around when to reduce or limit training
  • Stay within your area of expertise!
  • Defer to a sports dietitian/physician to establish a goal weight and when discussing weight/body composition recommendations
  • Understand and respect confidentiality
  • Discuss concerns privately with athletes and communicate a genuine concern for health.
  • Remember that the individual is a person first and an athlete second.
  • Have a list of resources available for your athletes and refer to an eating disorder professional if needed.
  • Provide consistent messages from medical/athletic/ mental health support staff
  • Model a healthy relationship with your body and food to your athletes
  • Make it a priority for your athletes to fuel and hydrate appropriately before, during, and after practices and competition
  • Recognize the importance of your role in your athletes’ lives
  • Remember that you create/support an environment that either prevents or promotes eating disorders within your team.

College coach speaking with a playerHelpful Messages (*Communicated by athletes with eating disorders):

  • “The coaches that made me feel safe and supported were the most helpful”
  • “I was in denial. It’s hard to hear when someone confronts you with your own struggles. I was defensive and maybe a little mean. It was helpful when I had coaches that were consistent with their messages and continued to hold the boundary that my health means more than the awkward conversation”
  • “Just ask me if I am okay in a friendly and approachable manner”
  • “It’s helpful when my coaches said, ‘We are concerned about you. How are you doing mentally? Can we help at all?’”
  • “I had a coach approach my struggles with me by saying, ‘It seems you hit a plateau. Why don’t we set up a session with the dietician to see how to get the most out of our training’”?
  • “I feel like gyms and athletic departments should provide resources for eating disorders so that I could confidentially obtain support resources.”
  • Announce to the whole team, “Remember to hydrate. Listen to your body”
  • “The coaches that talked about the importance of rest and recovery days made it more normalized and not something that made me feel lazy.”
  • “I am not attached to an outcome with your sport performance or appearance; I just want you to be okay as a whole person.”

Resources:

1. Association of Applied Sport Psychology, Eating Disorder Special Interest Group. Detection and Referral Resources: https://appliedsportpsych.org/about/special-interest-groups/eating-disorders/
2. NEDA (National Eating Disorder Association) coaches tool kit: https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/learn/help/coaches-trainers
3. Reardon C.L., Hainline B, Aron, C.M., et al. (2019). Mental Health in Elite Athletes. International Olympic Committee Consensus Statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine 53:667–699.
4. Selby, L. B. & Reel, J.J. (2011). A Coach’s Guide to Identifying and Helping Athletes with Eating Disorders, Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, 2:2, 100-112.
5. The Victory Program at McCallum Place: www.thevictoryprogram.com


About the Sponsor:

McCallum Place is a nationally recognized eating disorder treatment center where professionals can help guide you through the process of treatment and recovery every step of the way. We operate treatment facilities in St. Louis, Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, that offers comprehensive medical, nutritional, and psychological care within the flexibility of several levels of treatment for adult men and women, adolescents, and elite athletes alike. We will work with you personally to create a treatment program that is right for you.


About the Authors:

Amanda Schlitzer Tierney, MS, CSCS – Strength and Conditioning Coach at The Victory Program at McCallum Place

Amanda Schlitzer TierneyAmanda is an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and holds her Master’s degree in Sport Science/ Exercise Psychology from Lock Haven University and her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Chestnut Hill College. She is the Strength and Conditioning Coach for The Victory Program at McCallum Place and is the Owner/Founder of Discovering Balance: Fitness Coaching and Support.

Amanda is an affiliated professional of the Body Positive Fitness Alliance and is currently the Co-Chair of the Association for Applied Sports Psychology: Eating Disorder Special Interest Group. Amanda has been working with athletes and non-athletes with eating disorders since 2006. Over the years, Amanda gained a wide-range of knowledge for this specialized population and found her true passion: helping individuals incorporate balanced exercise into the recovery environment.

Amanda’s goal as a Strength and Conditioning Coach is working with individuals to help identify unhealthy exercise thoughts and behaviors and supporting them in redefining their relationship with fitness. She aims to help her patients find a balance between challenging the body and bringing the fun back to exercise. She encourages listening to one’s body cues and adequate fueling to maintain a healthy body and mind. Amanda’s target reaches beyond the patient and she strives to educate athletes, teams, coaches, parents, athletic trainers, and sport medicine personnel on how to work with this specialized population.

Riley Nickols, Ph.D., CEDS

Riley Nickols PicRiley Nickols, Ph.D. is a counseling and sports psychologist for McCallum Place Eating Disorder Centers who specializes in treating athletes with eating disorders. Dr. Nickols obtained an MS in Sports Psychology from Ithaca College and a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Fordham University. He regularly speaks to athletes, coaches, and sports medicine personnel about issues related to disordered eating and unbalanced exercise in sports.

Additionally, Dr. Nickols consults with eating disorder professionals on best practices for integrating exercise during treatment. Dr. Nickols maintains a private practice in St. Louis, MO where he primarily works with athletes addressing both clinical and performance concerns. He is sensitive to the unique demands of recovery in relation to training and competing in sports.

Dr. Nickols’ research has examined the relationship between self-confidence and anxiety among athletes before and after competition and has focused on the psychological experiences of athletes returning to competition after experiencing an injury. In addition to competing in endurance sports for over 15 years, Dr. Nickols is a running coach and a USA Triathlon coach.

Travis Stewart, LPC, NCC, MATS – Director of Marketing & Business Development at McCallum Place Eating Disorder Centers

Travis Stewart Headshot Photo

Travis Stewart, LPC, NCC, MATS is the Director of Marketing & Business Development at McCallum Place Eating Disorder Centers. He has worked in the field of eating disorders since 2003 in both clinical and marketing roles at every level of care. He brings a unique blend of clinical expertise and communication skills to his role with McCallum Place. He is passionate about connecting people to resources and experiences that are transformative and healing.

Travis graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1991 with a degree in advertising and immediately began working with the international ministry of The Navigators, mentoring students. After 8 years, his desire to better understand how people change and heal led to obtaining a Master of Arts in Counseling (2001) and a Master of Arts in Theological Studies (2003) from Covenant Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri where he now lives with his family.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective of eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Reviewed & Approved on June 12, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern, MS, LPC
Published June 12, 2019, on EatingDisorderHope.com


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11 Jun

Contributed by Brittney Williams LPC, MHSP with Canopy Cove

Why outpatient therapy? My clients ask me this question often, especially when making the decision whether to start treatment at the Intensive Outpatient (IOP) Level of Care. Clinical care guidelines always inform the level of care decisions, but most often, I do try to keep my clients in the outpatient versus intensive outpatient setting if at all possible.

The commitment to participate in an IOP generally means a commitment to treatment three or more days a week for several hours a day. The time commitment required of IOP can be burdensome and interfere with school and work schedules.

At times IOP even interferes with scheduling the pleasurable activities that define a healthy recovery. Flexible outpatient therapy can provide more constant support when needed but without the same time commitment as IOP.

Along with the commitment of time comes a significant financial burden associated with IOP. Conversations about the relative cost of one service versus another and the bundling of services become quite complex.

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In general, the services of a single provider are more affordable than the services offered at the IOP level, which are often charged to insurance and applied to yearly deductibles and out of pocket maximums.

With outpatient therapy, the consumer, in this case, the client, exactly knows what the service they are paying for in advance and can make informed decisions. The cost of individual psychotherapy is often covered by insurance, and the cost to the client is a copay.

Perhaps the most significant advantage of the outpatient relationship in treating an eating disorder is the availability of a long-term relationship in which to the very difficult work of recovery. By definition, the IOP setting is a time-limited treatment experience, and the relationships with a therapist developed during IOP treatment will be time-limited.

Woman in outpatient therapy and smelling flowersThe outpatient treatment setting allows a secure attachment to a therapist who can be available on the client’s journey toward recovery for months and perhaps years.

The outpatient setting presents a unique opportunity to treat attachment trauma and provides an opportunity for creating a safe environment where there can be strong therapeutic work done at a lower level intervention.

An excellent eating disorder clinician will know clinical guidelines and will make a referral to the IOP level of care when ongoing treatment by a team is needed. On occasion, the outpatient therapist is part of that team.

One goal of finding an excellent eating disorder therapist is to find someone who understands that eating disorder recovery is a process, not an event.

This therapist understands that at times, eating disorder treatment takes a team but that it is important that in long-term recovery one looks at the financial and practical considerations when determining the appropriate level of care of clients.


About Our Sponsor:

Canopy Cove Eating Disorder Treatment Center is a leading residential Eating Disorder Treatment Center with 25 years’ experience treating adults and teens who are seeking lasting recovery from Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder and other related eating disorders.

We are a licensed rehabilitative provider accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. Trusted and recommended by doctors and therapists throughout the country, our program provides clients with clinical excellence and compassionate care.

As one of the most experienced Eating Disorder Centers in the nation, we’ve developed a highly effective program that incorporates solid evidence-based therapies which have been shown to increase recovery rates.

  • Each person we treat receives a customized treatment plan tailored to their specific needs.
  • We increase recovery rates by simultaneously treating co-existing conditions such as anxiety, depression. (We also accept clients with an Eating Disorder and co-existing Diabetes).
  • We provide family education and family therapy throughout the recovery process. (Offered by phone for out of town families).
    Our Christian-based eating disorder treatment program warmly accepts all clients from various belief systems.

Get help now. Call 855-338-8620.
www.canopycove.com
[email protected]


About the Author:

Brittney Williams Headshot - 6-5-19Brittney Williams LPC, MHSP – Fairhaven Treatment Center

Brittney received her bachelor of science in Psychology at Mississippi State University and her Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling with a specialization in Marriage/Couples, and Family counseling at the University of Alabama.

Brittney is a National Certified Counselor and a licensed professional counselor mental health specialist currently under licensure supervision.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective of eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Reviewed & Approved on May 6, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern, MS, LPC
Published May 6, 2019, on EatingDisorderHope.com


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10 Jun

Anorexia Nervosa can easily be a death sentence. Anorexia kills the body, mind, and spirit and has the highest mortality rate of any mental health issue. It is life-threatening and saps all energy, vitality, and personality from its victims.

Most sufferers from anorexia feel emotionally flat, spiritually empty and listless. Suicide is highly possible, and those that try it are more likely to die than those struggling with binge eating disorder (BED), bulimia or other forms of disordered eating.

It’s estimated that 4% of men, women and children fighting anorexia will die.

Anorexia Kills

Anorexia can and often does destroy the body of very talented people.  It may be the common drive for perfection coupled with anxiety that leads to much success but also destroys the spirit of the individual.

Anorexia is usually characterized by extremely low body weight for the height and stature of an individual.  Those that suffer from anorexia nervosa are engaged in self-starvation and are highly preoccupied with their body weight.

Karen Carpenter

For example, Karen Carpenter died at 32 yrs of age in the prime of her musical career. Her death in 1983 was caused by complications related to decades of practicing anorexic behaviors.

We lost a lovely soul, voice, and being to a disease that is treatable – particularly when intervention occurs early on in the disease. What outstanding creative genius and music is left unexplored due to this loss?

Isabelle Caro

Isabelle Caro also tragically died from anorexia nervosa. She was a beautiful French model who was an advocate for eating disorder awareness and prevention.  Growing up, she had a traumatic childhood and struggled to overcome the isolation and loneliness of her upbringing.

Isabelle shed light on anorexia and body image issues when she was featured on a Jessica Simpson show titled “The Price of Beauty” in 2010. She also brought anorexia into the spotlight when the Italian Fashion Week billboard displayed Isabelle’s emaciated body and forced many in the fashion industry to question their unhealthy thinness standards.

Sadly, she died November 17, 2010, from autoimmune complications attributed to her years of practicing anorexia. The world parted too soon with a woman of tremendous courage and fortitude.

Even though anorexia kills, in most cases, anorexia nervosa is treatable. As a therapist and the founder of Eating Disorder Hope, I can personally attest to countless amazing recovery stories where men and women were at death’s door and turned it around!

Their sometimes miraculous recoveries came about with excellent treatment by eating disorder specialists.  Recovery from anorexia nervosa is absolutely possible!

This is not something to fight alone. This eating disorder commands the best care you can possibly receive in order to recover.  If you or someone you care about has anorexia, it is time to pull out all the stops.

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Because anorexia kills, it is worth the awkward conversation and even possible loss of the relationship in order to save the life of the sufferer.  If you do not know where to begin the conversation, then reach out to Eating Disorder Hope, the National Eating Disorders Association, or the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. Any of these eating disorder resources can assist you in helping your loved one or yourself.

The gifts, talents, and contributions of those struggling with anorexia can be profoundly beneficial to society.  The fight is not just to save the life of the individual with anorexia, but to ensure that the world can reap the rewards of all that the sufferer will contribute in making the world a better place.

The person suffering from anorexia also deserves the opportunity to recover from the eating disorder and to be able to fully and meaningfully contribute – as this is the stuff that makes life worth living!


Source:

1. Grimes, W. (2010, December 30). Isabelle Caro, Anorexic Model, Dies at 28. Retrieved May 5, 2019, from https://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/31/world/europe/31caro.html

2. Arcelus, J., Mitchell, A. J., Wales, J., & Nielsen, S. (2011). Mortality rates in patients with Anorexia Nervosa and other eating disorders. Archives of General Psychiatry, 68(7), 724-731.

3.Crow, S.J., Peterson, C.B., Swanson, S.A., Raymond, N.C., Specker, S., Eckert, E.D., Mitchell, J.E. (2009) Increased mortality in bulimia nervosa and other eating disorders. American Journal of Psychiatry 1661342-1346.


About the author:

Jacquelyn EkernJacquelyn Ekern, MS, LPC founded Eating Disorder Hope in 2005, driven by a profound desire to help those struggling with anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating disorder. This passion resulted from her battle with, and recovery from, an eating disorder. As president, Jacquelyn manages Ekern Enterprises, Inc. and the Eating Disorder Hope website. In addition, she is a fully licensed therapist with a closed private counseling practice specializing in the treatment of eating disorders.

Jacquelyn has a Bachelor of Science in Human Services degree from The University of Phoenix and a Masters degree in Counseling/Psychology, from Capella University. She has extensive experience in the eating disorder field including advanced education in psychology, participation, and contributions to additional eating disorder groups, symposiums, and professional associations. She is a member of the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA), Academy of Eating Disorders (AED), the Eating Disorders Coalition (EDC) and the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (iaedp).

Jacquelyn enjoys art, working out, walking her dogs, reading, painting and time with family.
Although Eating Disorder Hope was founded by Jacquelyn Ekern, this organization would not be possible without support from our generous sponsors.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective of eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Reviewed & Approved on June 10, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern MS, LPC
Published June 10, 2019, on EatingDisorderHope.com


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07 Jun

Maudsley Method Therapy, also known as Family-Based Treatment (FBT), is an intervention created to treat individuals struggling with Anorexia Nervosa (AN).

The treatment itself was devised in the Maudsley Hospital in London after a study of 80 patients diagnosed with Anorexia found that family-based interventions were more effective in treating those under the age of 18 [SOURCE].

The method involves 3 phases that generally take one year for a patient and their family to complete.

According to MaudsleyParents.org, the treatment involves parents playing “an active and positive role in order to:

(1) Help restore their child’s weight to normal levels expected given their adolescent’s age and height

(2) Hand the control over eating back to the adolescent, and

(3) Encourage normal development through an in-depth discussion of these crucial developmental issues as they pertain to their child [2].”

Maudsley Method 3 Phases

Phase 1 – Weight Restoration

In this phase, the most immediate danger to the individual is addressed – physical malnutrition.

The “therapist focuses on the dangers of severe malnutrition associated with AN, such as hypothermia, growth hormone changes, cardiac dysfunction, and cognitive and emotional changes” that could have arisen from a lack of proper nutrition [2].”

In this phase, the treatment team also assesses the family’s relationship patterns with one another as well as the family belief system related to food.

Parents and siblings play a role in this first phase, and it typically includes a family meal, during which time the therapist can observe interactions as well as provide feedback and support to all family members [2].

Phase 2 – Return Control Over Eating to the Adolescent

During this phase, the treatment team emphasizes that the goal is to encourage autonomy and independence by giving the adolescence back control over their eating habits [2].

Both the teen and parent(s) have the support of the treatment team as they navigate this return of control, which often involves addressing day-to-day issues that occur for the teen related to their eating habits, such as wanting to go over to a friend’s house for dinner.

Phase 3 – Establishing Healthy Adolescent Identity

As MaudsleyParent.org specifies, Phase 3 “is initiated when the adolescent is able to maintain weight above 95% of the ideal weight on her/his own, and self-starvation has abated [2].”

Dad talking to Teenage daughter with Anorexia during Maudsley Method therapy

This final phase of the Maudsley Method focuses on coping with how the Anorexia has impacted the teen’s healthy identity.

The teen will learn how to work with their autonomy, and the family also discusses appropriate parental boundaries [2].

Effectiveness

The Maudsley Method has been accepted as an evidence-based and effective treatment for Anorexia Nervosa, and it has met criteria for the American Psychological Association’s “well-established treatment” criteria [3].

Studies indicate that two-thirds of adolescents with Anorexia are recovered at the end of family-based therapy interventions [2]. This does not mean, however, that it is full-proof.

Some studies show that approximately 40% of teens experience ongoing psychological distress or Anorexia Symptoms [3].

One study, in particular, found that this may relate to Phase 3 of the Maudsley Method and that success with this method hinges on the adolescent and family gaining support in continuing treatment, adjusting to their shifting roles, and being able to rebuild their identities [3].

Studies also find that this method is most effective in teens who have experienced Anorexia Nervosa symptoms for “a relatively short period of time (i.e., less than 3 years) [2].”


Resources:

[1] Russell et al. (1987). An evaluation of family therapy in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Archives of General Psychiatry, 44:12, 1047-1056.

[2] LeGrance, D., Lock, J. (Unknown). Family-based treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa: the Maudsley approach. Maudsley Parents. Retrieved from http://www.maudsleyparents.org/whatismaudsley.html.

[3] Wufong, E. Rhodes, P., Conti, J. (2019). “We don’t really know what else we can do”: parent experience when adolescent distress persists after the Maudsley and family-based therapies for anorexia nervosa. Journal of Eating Disorders, 7:5.


Image of Margot Rittenhouse.About the Author: 

Margot Rittenhouse, MS, PLPC, NCC is a therapist who is passionate about providing mental health support to all in need and has worked with clients with substance abuse issues, eating disorders, domestic violence victims, and offenders, and severely mentally ill youth.

As a freelance writer for Eating Disorder Hope and Addiction Hope and a mentor with MentorConnect, Margot is a passionate eating disorder advocate, committed to de-stigmatizing these illnesses while showing support for those struggling through mentoring, writing, and volunteering. Margot has a Master’s of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Johns Hopkins University.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective on eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Published June 7, 2019, on EatingDisorderHope.com
Reviewed & Approved on June 7, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern MS, LPC


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07 Jun

The obsessive pursuit of being thin doesn’t just influence teenagers and younger women. A Kansas State University study revealed intense body image dissatisfaction by over 20 percent of middle-aged women in the United States. Eating disorders in middle-aged women is on the rise as they are striving to be “young forever.”

The desire to look like the myriad of media-portrayed ‘beauty’ with white teeth, flawless skin, long legs, and tiny waists forces women to assess themselves against these artificial images and feel insecure, ashamed and guilty. This pressure becomes even more profound for middle-aged women as advertisements upon advertisements promote looking young and thin forever.

Eating disorders in middle-aged women on the rise

Even though eating disorders often appear in adolescence, they have also been increasingly noticed among middle-aged and older women. One in 28 women aged 40 to 50 are living with an active eating disorder, such as anorexia and bulimia, a recent study revealed. These numbers come as a surprise when the most part of research has been focused upon adolescents and younger adults.

An online survey funded by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and presented on by the National Eating Disorders Association revealed that eating disorders are bound by no age limits.

Furthermore, the survey data showed that obvious eating disorder symptoms were confirmed by 13 percent of middle-aged women, while 70 percent reported they were attempting to lose weight.

Emmett R. Bishop, MD, a founding partner and medical director of adult services at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver has observed a noticeable increase in older women seeking treatment for eating disorders at his facility. Dr. Bishop termed this a patient demographic “that you would not have seen ten years ago.”

Most often, this particular patient population reported a triggering accident, which might be a stressful life event such as divorce or medical illness. In other cases, eating disorders were present all along but ignored until physical complications took over, Bishop explained.

Why is this more concerning for middle-aged women?

With the desire and pressure to be thin, the health effects of eating disorders in older women have become a significant concern. As the human body becomes less resilient with age, older women are less likely to bounce back from the repercussions of an eating disorder.

The threat of gastrointestinal, cardiac, bone, and even dental consequences intensifies as women mature. Such health consequences also have a significantly negative impact on other family members as well.

It is also important to remember that as women near middle-age, natural biological changes in energy levels, estrogen imbalances regarding menopause and reductions in muscle mass and metabolism all contribute to some or more weight gain.

Group for women battling Eating disorders in middle-aged womenEven more shockingly, a growing number of women report body weight and shape dissatisfaction as a primary motivator for both legal and illicit drug use. Stimulants are increasingly popular among women due to their ability to elevate metabolic functioning and inhibit appetite. As a result, middle-aged women are dying from drug overdoses at increasingly high rates.

Moving ahead

Stereotyping eating disorders as an illness of the young can be damaging and add to the already existing stigma that prevents a patient from seeking much-needed help.

It is essential to realize that the media manipulates our perceptions, and the “perfect bodies” are largely Photoshopped. Secondly, acknowledge that there is no quick fix, be it a diet, an exercise regimen, or a pill. What is most important is to adopt a healthy lifestyle with a well-adjusted balance of food and exercise to maximize your mental and physical health.

Above all, embrace who you are and how you look at the moment. Aging is the process of life, and nothing can stop that. Health, happiness, and confidence come in all shapes and sizes. Let’s not just believe that for ourselves but also promote an environment where women of all ages and sizes can accept their bodies and feel good about themselves.


References:

  1. https://www.menopausenow.com/weight-gain
  2. https://www.thefix.com/content/rate-eating-disorders-rising-among-middle-aged-women
  3. https://www.thesun.co.uk/living/2627647/surprising-number-of-middle-aged-women-are-battling-anorexia-and-bulimia-new-figures-warn/
  4. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/eating-disorders-news/201202/rise-in-middle-aged-and-older-women-eating-disorders

About the Author:

Sana Ahmed ImageSana Ahmed is a journalist and social media savvy content writer with extensive research, print, and on-air interview skills. She has previously worked as a staff writer for a renowned rehabilitation institute, a content writer for a marketing agency, an editor for a business magazine and been an on-air news broadcaster.

Sana graduated with a Bachelors in Economics and Management from the London School of Economics and began a career of research and writing right after. Her recent work has largely been focused upon mental health and addiction recovery.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective of eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Published on May 23, 2019.
Reviewed & Approved on May 23, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern MS, LPC

Published on EatingDisorderHope.com


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06 Jun

Sex and Eating Disorders have a strong correlation. Sex is both a biological and emotional act. Eating disorders are biological and emotional disorders. As such, one, undoubtedly, impacts the other.

The topic of sex is often viewed as taboo, making it difficult to find information on how eating disorders impact sex, AND it’s harder for those struggling with an eating disorder to talk about this impact.

That precisely is why we’re going there.

The Body

At its’ core, sex is a biological function that requires the body to perform optimally to “get things going.” Eating disorders make it difficult for the body to do this job.

For both men and women, the malnutrition that often occurs in eating disorders results in the reduction or absence of hormone secretion.

This disturbance in hormone production and secretion makes the physiological act of having and enjoying sex difficult [1].

The physiological impacts of eating disorders also impact the brain’s ability to fire specific neurons and send signals throughout the body, impacting sexual arousal as well as emotions. This can often lead to a decrease in feelings of intimacy and connection.

Bottom line, the biological aspects of eating disorders create a ripple effect that impacts sexuality, both physically and emotionally.

One article reported, “women with eating disorders display more negative attitudes toward sex, increased sexual anxiety, and less sexual satisfaction, while men with eating disorders display significant sexual anxiety that is even greater than their female counterparts [2].”

The Self

Eating disorders are often characterized by distorted body-image and self-view as well as low self-esteem, factors which are also associated with sexual anxiety and insecurity and absolutely effect interest, enjoyment, and performance in the bedroom.

Truly engaging in a sexual experience is challenging when one is feeling ashamed of, or uncomfortable with, the shape, size, and appearance of their body.

Personality traits of individuals with eating disorders may also impact their sex life.

As one article specified, “individuals with eating disorders who are emotionally constricted and overcontrolled report restrictive sexual functioning, whereas those with personality profiles marked by emotional dysregulation and under-control report more impulsive and self-destructive sexuality profiles [1].

This shows an interesting commonality between the ways an individual may experience their eating disorder as well as their sex life.

Do you need help now? Call a specialist at Eating Disorder Solutions: 1-855-783-2519

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The Relationship

When there is an invisible yet domineering and dangerous third party in your relationship, it is difficult for either partner to connect. Significant others often describe feeling like they “come second” to their partner’s eating disorder.

The challenges that an eating disorder can create in a relationship understandably flow into the sex life of those involved. Women struggling with Anorexia Nervosa not only report difficulties with their sexual relationships but also discord between them and their partners [1].

Re-Igniting the Fire

Young couple who overcame issues with Sex and Eating DisordersWeight and sexual satisfaction are correlated in that lower weight is positively correlated with reduced sexual satisfaction [1]. The good news is that the reverse is also true: weight restoration is positively correlated with increased sexual enjoyment [1].

The bad news is that negative attitudes toward sex linger long after treatment [2].

While the physical often improves, the emotional impacts of constrictive personality traits, low self-esteem, and body dissatisfaction take longer to combat.

Sex is a natural way for humans to connect with one another, and it is nothing of which to be ashamed.

Yet, it is rarely spoken about in eating disorder treatment, often leading to individuals not addressing the impacts above and feeling alone and depressed as a result.

Improving this aspect of treatment and recovery first involves taking the advice of Salt-N-Pepa – “Let’s talk about sex!”


Resources:

[1] Pinheiro, A. P. et al. (2010). Sexual functioning in women with eating disorders. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 43: 123-129.

[2] Unknown, (2016). Eating disorders and sexuality. Mirror, Mirror: Eating Disorder Help, retrieved from https://www.mirror-mirror.org/sex.htm.


Image of Margot Rittenhouse.About the Author: 

Margot Rittenhouse, MS, PLPC, NCC is a therapist who is passionate about providing mental health support to all in need and has worked with clients with substance abuse issues, eating disorders, domestic violence victims, and offenders, and severely mentally ill youth.

As a freelance writer for Eating Disorder Hope and Addiction Hope and a mentor with MentorConnect, Margot is a passionate eating disorder advocate, committed to de-stigmatizing these illnesses while showing support for those struggling through mentoring, writing, and volunteering. Margot has a Master’s of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Johns Hopkins University.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective on eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Published on May 24, 2019.
Reviewed & Approved on May 24, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern MS, LPC

Published on EatingDisorderHope.com


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06 Jun

In recovery from bulimia, relapses are to be expected, as they are a normal part of the recovery process. In fact, relapse rates are estimated to be anywhere from 30 to 85% for those who’ve been successfully treated for bulimia. [1, 4] So, how does a person help a teenager relapsing into Bulimia?

To clarify, a “relapse” is the reoccurrence of bulimia behaviors after a period of their absence. Relapses often occur during times of high stress and emotional distress — as these are times when new coping skills are difficult to recall. While many teens often feel shame, helplessness, hopelessness, sadness, or frustration when a relapse occurs, it doesn’t mean that they have failed at recovery. [2]

Here are five ways you can help a teenager relapsing into Bulimia:

1. Express compassion and understanding. Recovery from bulimia is a laborious, tumultuous process. It is essential to acknowledge and express compassion and understanding of the teen’s emotions and experience around the relapse. Recognizing and acknowledging the challenges of recovery can go a long way. It’s equally important to hold compassion for yourself as a support person, too.

2. Acknowledge that relapse is a normal part of the recovery process. After validating the teen by expressing compassion and understanding, it can be helpful to remind them that relapse is to be expected. Relapsing is an indicator that the teen is learning how to make long-lasting changes, and thus, they are strengthening their recovery. Normalizing relapse can help diffuse any harsh judgments the teen is having about themselves and the relapse — it’s likely that these types of harsh judgments will only make the relapse worse.

3. Guide the teen back toward recovery. Support the teen by having them identify what factors contributed to the relapse. Ask the teen how they can cope with similar triggering situations in the future. Help them to identify what techniques and coping strategies they used previously in recovery that may be helpful to use now.

4. Get support. If the relapse occurs for two weeks or longer, the teen will likely benefit from increased support — including a return to treatment (a visit to their therapist or dietitian) for a booster session or two. Typically, treatment following a relapse is briefer than the original treatment and can be extremely helpful in staying the course of recovery.

5. Full recovery is possible. Reassure the teen that while recovery from bulimia is challenging, it is possible, and getting support and treatment is vital. Those who receive treatment within the first 5 years of struggling with bulimia have a recovery rate of 80%. While those who waited more than 15 years after their symptoms began to get treatment, experienced recovery rates closer to 20%. [3]

For a teenager relapsing into Bulimia and most people struggling with bulimia, recovery goes through several stages and is characterized by steps forward and steps back. It is crucial to stay the course, to get support, and to remember that full recovery is possible. [4]


Sources:

1. Chakraborty, K., & Basu, D. (2010). Management of anorexia and bulimia nervosa: An evidence-based review. Indian journal of psychiatry, 52(2), 174–186. doi:10.4103/0019-5545.64596

2. Grilo, C. M., Pagano, M. E., Stout, R. L., Markowitz, J. C., Ansell, E. B., Pinto, A., … Skodol, A. E. (2012). Stressful life events predict eating disorder relapse following remission: six-year prospective outcomes. The International journal of eating disorders, 45(2), 185–192. doi:10.1002/eat.20909

3. Reas, D. L., Williamson, D. A., Martin, C. K. and Zucker, N. L. (2000), Duration of illness predicts outcome for bulimia nervosa: A long‐term follow‐up study. Int. J. Eat. Disord., 27: 428-434. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1098-108X(200005)27:4<428::AID-EAT7>3.0.CO;2-Y

4. National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK). (2014). Eating Disorders: Core Interventions in the Treatment and Management of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa and Related Eating Disorders. NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 9. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK49318/.


About the Author:

Chelsea Fielder-JenksChelsea Fielder-Jenks, LPC is a Licensed Professional Counselor in private practice in Austin, Texas. Chelsea works with individuals, families, and groups primarily from a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) framework.

She has extensive experience working with adolescents, families, and adults who struggle with eating, substance use, and various co-occurring mental health disorders. You can learn more about Chelsea and her private practice at ThriveCounselingAustin.com.


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective on eating disorders. These are not necessarily the views of Eating Disorder Hope, but an effort to offer a discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Eating Disorder Hope understand that eating disorders result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an eating disorder, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Published on May 20, 2019.
Reviewed & Approved on May 20, 2019, by Jacquelyn Ekern MS, LPC

Published on EatingDisorderHope.com


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