Diets & Weight Loss // Category

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21 Aug

Sponsored by Cascadian Farm and TheFeedfeed.

The older I get, the more comfort I find in routine, which is something I didn’t realize I took such comfort in until I had James, and all routine went out the window. I missed predictability, structure. We were eating takeout more frequently than ever—or snacking straight through meals—and within a few weeks, I recognized just how much I craved the normalcy of regular, healthy meals and how good they left me feeling. Now that James is 11 months old, routine is back in our lives. We have a morning routine, nap routine, bedtime routine—and eating balanced, intentional meals are vital to keeping all of them running smoothly. Since I love reading about other people’s daily lives, I thought it would be fun to give you a peek inside our mornings.

One thing I always, always, always aim for is a balance between great taste and good nutrition, especially in the morning, knowing that how I start my day has the power to set the tone for the rest of it. This is why I like Cascadian Farm organic whole grain cereals. Not only do they taste good, but they make me feel good about eating them, too. More on that below!

Our Morning Routine

6am
On a typical day, I wake up when I hear James start to stir on the monitor set next to my bed around 6 o’clock, but occasionally he’ll wake up as late as 7 (7:45 once, which was alarming to me) and as early as 4:30am. I get out of bed, brush my teeth, and go to his room. No matter how tired I feel, I am so happy to see him when I walk through his door. “Good morning, my baby boy” I say, as he smiles, waves, and says “Hi!” (sometimes with a ‘T’ on the end—hiiiiiT, which is funny and adorable). I change his diaper before heading downstairs.

6:15-6:30
James plays with his basket of toys that I keep in the kitchen while I pour myself an iced coffee (yes, even in the winter). The second I open the fridge though, he power crawls toward it and attempts to climb the shelves inside it—and depending on how many potentially dangerous glass items are in it, I decide whether or not to let him try. I make him a bottle.

6:30
I carry the bottle, my coffee, and James into the living room and feed him on the couch, which takes anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes depending on how distracted he gets. Afterward, we read books and play on the floor for a while. By 7:15 or so, James will get engrossed in playing with something (lately he’s loving this farmhouse my sister-in-law gave us because it comes with a dozen plastic farm animals) and I’ll let him play by himself for 10 minutes while I put on a load of laundry or clean up the kitchen. And if I can’t sneak away, I don’t sweat it, because one thing I’ve learned in motherhood is that the more productive I think I should be while I’m with him, the more overwhelmed I feel and the less well I do any single thing.

8am
Around 8 o’clock, James will rub his eyes, yawn, crawl into my lap and lay his head on my shoulder (and I melt). We go upstairs to his room for a nap. If you’ve read my baby posts, then you know that my little guy has never had the easiest time with sleep. Thankfully, he’s got nighttime sleep down, but naps are always touch and go. Sometimes he’ll sleep on his own in his crib and sometimes I have to hold him for the duration of the nap. There have been stretches of time when it seems like we turned a corner and he’s figured out napping on his own, but they’re always short-lived. That’s OK, though! Daniel and I don’t get worked up about it. We know that eventually he’ll get the hang of it and we’ll drown in a pool of our own tears over how much we miss holding him every day.

His first nap of the day is usually an hour long, sometimes two. I sit in the glider, holding him across my chest with a pillow kind of propping him up under his side (so that my arm doesn’t atrophy) and set my laptop on my knees. I’ve gotten really, really good at typing with one hand.

This naptime is precious because I’m my sharpest and most energetic in the morning, so any work task I really need to tackle that day is best handled as early as possible. I spend the first 10 minutes reading and replying to emails. Over the years I’ve learned that email can be a black hole, so setting a time limit keeps me focused and productive.

After email, I open up my To Do list. I make this list of To-Do’s every night before I go to bed—a habit I’ve kept up for a few years now. The list used to serve as a kind of brain dump, a way of clearing all the clutter in my mind before bed, but now it’s more of a way of being intentional with my time and energy. I always make sure to order the list by importance (with #1 being top priority) and break-down larger tasks into specific, actionable items (for example, rather than “Publish chicken blog post,” I’ll list: Draft headnote for chicken recipe, edit and upload photos, calculate nutrition). I spend the remainder of James’ nap tackling that list—writing blog posts, editing articles for my Yahoo column, editing photos, etc. I know I’ll have a few hours in the afternoon to continue working so I don’t need to accomplish everything. My only goal is to achieve, or at least make headway, on the hardest/most overwhelming task on the list.

9:30am
Once James wakes up, I change his diaper and we head downstairs for breakfast. I make him a bowl of oatmeal with milk and mix-ins like apple and cinnamon, berries, banana…and while that cools, I prep my own breakfast. I like something easy and convenient, so a yogurt bowl is my go-to, with plain yogurt (sometimes I buy Greek for myself but most often I just use the plain whole milk yogurt that I buy for James), fruit, and some type of crunchy whole grain granola or cereal.

I’ve been a fan of Cascadian Farm’s organic whole grain cereals and granolas for years because they’re full of fiber and made with nutritious, organic ingredients that are easy to identify. This week, I’m trying the New Cascadian Farm Gluten Free Honey Vanilla Crunch Cereal. The toasty honey-vanilla flavor on these tiny puffed squares reminds me of French toast, only it’s not the slightest bit cloying or artificial-tasting, like some flavored cereals can be. And with ingredients like whole grain cornmeal, whole grain sorghum flour, chickpea flour, and dried sweet potato, there’s a whopping 26 grams of whole grain in each box.

10:15
After breakfast, both of us are usually covered in whatever we ate, so now’s the time to clean up and get dressed for the day. The caveat is that we’re at the stage where James hates lying still for diaper or clothing changes. Have you seen videos of people trying to wrangle a crocodile? That’s what it looks like here. The silver lining is that putting clothes on my baby might technically count as cardio.

Once we’re dressed, we leave the house for an activity. Either we go to the park, to the library for story time or music class, the grocery store, or we run some type of errand.

What does your morning routine look like?

Credit: Source link

12 Aug

This delicious spinach salad has a lovely homemade orange vinaigrette and strawberries, it all works so well together! Have it as a side salad or turn it into a tasty main by adding chicken or salmon.

When the weather is hot, there’s nothing like a sweet and savory salad! This strawberry and spinach salad is light, fresh and so tasty. Packed with goodness, it’s a cinch to whip up and can even be prepped ahead of time. Leaving more time for enjoying the sun (with sunscreen liberally applied of course!).

I added a chopped romaine heart to the baby spinach for more texture, and it delivers a satisfying crunch!

It’s a versatile salad too, working as a side or main course if you top with chicken or salmon.

Simple, fresh, delicious and easy – Enjoy!

How To Make Strawberry and Spinach Salad – Step By Step

For the Orange Vinaigrette:

  • In a small bowl, whisk the vinegar, orange zest, honey, salt, and pepper.
  • While whisking constantly, stream in the olive oil, whisking until incorporated.

For the Spinach Salad:

  • In a large bowl, toss the spinach, romaine, red onion, almonds, and goat cheese.
  • Add the strawberries and vinaigrette and toss to coat. Serve.

Strawberry and Spinach Salad – A Perfect Make Ahead Salad

You can make the salad ahead of time. Great if you’ve got a party coming up or you want a stress free meal! Combine the spinach and romaine in your serving bowl, cover, and refrigerate. Slice the red onion, hull and quarter the strawberries, crumble the goat cheese; place each ingredient in separate bowls, cover, and refrigerate until ready to assemble. Toast the almonds, let cool, then store in the refrigerator. Make the vinaigrette, place in a small container or store in a mason jar, and refrigerate until you’re ready to serve. Remove the chilled ingredients from the fridge 30 minutes before assembling to allow them to come to room temperature.

Health Benefits of Strawberries

Strawberries are not always a go to salad ingredient, but their sweetness works well with the subtle earthy bitterness of the spinach, the crumbled cheese and the awesome orange vinaigrette! But strawberries are also packed with great nutrients – so a win win!

Strawberries’ carbs consists mainly of fibers and simple sugars. They have a relatively low GI and should not cause big spikes in blood sugar levels. Dietary fibers are important to feed the friendly bacteria in your gut and improve digestive health. They are also useful for weight loss and can help prevent many diseases.

Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C, an antioxidant necessary for immune and skin health.

Strawberries also contain a good amount of Folate (vitamin B9). One of the B vitamins, folate is important for normal tissue growth and cell function — and fundamental for pregnant women and older adults.

So just a few benefits!

Homemade Vinaigrette – Perfect For This Strawberry and Spinach Salad

When making homemade vinaigrette, it’s crucial to season it with a pinch of salt and pepper. To help the vinaigrette ingredients emulsify (to better incorporate the oil into the other ingredients), add your olive oil last, whisking constantly while you slowly stream in the oil.

The orange vinaigrette is perfect to drizzle on top! Easy to make, it’s made with red wine vinegar, orange zest (adds a subtle citrusy fragrance), honey, salt, pepper, and olive oil. You can substitute apple cider vinegar for the red wine vinegar.

Top Tips For Strawberry and Spinach Salad

  • Use the freshest ingredients available.
  • For the vinaigrette, make sure to dissolve the granular ingredients before pouring the oil in.
  • Because a vinaigrette isn’t being cooked, opt for the highest quality oils you have on hand.
  • Turn this salad from a side to a main by adding protein such as chicken or salmon.

Check Out These Other Delicious Salad Recipes

BBQ Chicken Bacon Ranch Salad

Waldorf Tuna Salad with Greek Yogurt, Apples, Grapes, and Walnuts

Farro Salad with Kale, Sun Dried Tomatoes, and Chickpeas

Harvest Pear Gorgonzola Salad with Roasted Vegetables

Green Goddess Quinoa Summer Salad by Pinch of Yum

Summer Pasta Salad by Spend with Pennies

If you have tried this Strawberry and Spinach Salad recipe, or any other recipe on my blog, then please rate it and let me know how it turned out in the comments below! You can also FOLLOW ME on FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM and PINTEREST to see more delicious, healthy, family friendly food!

Strawberry and Spinach Salad

This delicious spinach salad has a lovely homemade orange vinaigrette and strawberries, it all works so well together! Have it as a side salad or turn it into a tasty main by adding chicken or salmon.

Prep Time10 mins

Total Time10 mins

Course: Main Course, Salad, Side Dish

Cuisine: American

Keyword: orange vinaigrette, spinach salad, strawberry salad

Servings: 6 servings

Calories: 162

For the Orange Vinaigrette:

  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons grated orange zest
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • Pinch salt
  • Pinch freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

For the Spinach Salad:

  • 5 cups baby spinach 5 ounces
  • 1 heart romaine lettuce chopped
  • ¼ medium red onion thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup sliced almonds
  • cup crumbled goat cheese or feta cheese
  • 2 cups strawberries hulled and cut into quarters

For the Orange Vinaigrette:

  • In a small bowl, whisk the vinegar, orange zest, honey, salt, and pepper. While whisking constantly, stream in the olive oil, whisking until incorporated.

For the Spinach Salad:

  • In a large bowl, toss the spinach, romaine, red onion, almonds, and goat cheese. Add the strawberries and vinaigrette and toss to coat. Serve.

Calories: 162kcal | Carbohydrates: 9g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 6mg | Sodium: 117mg | Potassium: 273mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 2880IU | Vitamin C: 36.7mg | Calcium: 66mg | Iron: 1.5mg


Credit: Source link

05 Aug

Create a restaurant quality chicken dinner at home that is packed full of flavor! The best grilled chicken topped with pantry ingredients. It doesn’t get much better than this!

Make a restaurant-quality chicken recipe with boneless skinless chicken breasts and a few flavorful store-bought ingredients (that you can keep on hand at all times for an easy yet impressive meal).

How to make Best Grilled Chicken Recipe with Artichokes, Sun Dried Tomatoes and Feta

  • In a small bowl, whisk the cider vinegar, garlic, basil, oregano, oil, salt, and pepper. Pour the mixture into a gallon-size resealable plastic bag and add the chicken. Press as much air from the bag as possible and seal. Turn the bag a few times to coat all of the chicken in marinade and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and up to 1 day, turning the bag occasionally to ensure the chicken marinates evenly.
  • Preheat your gas grill with all burners on high and close the lid. When the grill is hot (after about 15 minutes), turn the 2 burners closest to the front to low, keeping the back burner on high. Remove the chicken from the bag and arrange on the grates over the low heat burners. Cover and cook until the underside of the chicken is just beginning to develop light grill marks, 6 to 9 minutes. Flip the chicken, cover, and continue to cook until the chicken is firm to touch, 6 to 9 minutes longer. To get a nice char on the chicken, now move the chicken to the part of the grill over high flames and cook uncovered until each side has solid grill marks, 5 to 6 minutes, flipping halfway. The chicken should be completely firm to the touch and register 160 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer.
  • Transfer the chicken to a plate, tent with foil, and let it rest for 5 minutes before topping with artichokes, sun dried tomatoes, and crumbled feta.

A delicious topping for the best grilled chicken

This tasty grilled chicken is topped with jarred artichokes, jarred sun dried tomatoes, and feta cheese. This makes for a fresh and flavorful weeknight meal that comes together really quickly. Keep a jar of marinated artichokes and a jar of sun dried tomatoes in your pantry for an easy, restaurant-quality chicken dinner whenever you fancy!

Marinated Grilled Chicken Recipe

To tenderize and add flavor to the chicken breasts themselves, marinate the chicken for at least 30 minutes in a mix of balsamic vinegar, garlic, dried basil and oregano, and olive oil. Fresh garlic is preferable but you can substitute 1 teaspoon of garlic powder for the 3 cloves with no impact on flavor. The marinade adds an amazing flavor to the chicken when you grill it, as well as making it beautifully tender and succulent.

How to Store Feta Cheese

I like to keep feta cheese in my fridge at all times because the richness and tang of feta has the power to upgrade almost any recipe. I buy it in block form, packaged in brine, because it’s softer and creamier than the pre-crumbled feta. Another perk of buying a block of feta in brine is that it should keep for a few months if left unopened. Once opened, feta in brine will keep for anywhere from 1 week to 6 weeks if you keep it covered in brine in a sealed container. An unopened packaged of crumbled feta cheese, on the other hand, will only keep for about a week. My rule of thumb is, if you have to wonder whether something is fresh or not, it isn’t worth the risk so toss it.

Top tips to make Best Grilled Chicken Recipe with Artichokes, Sun Dried Tomatoes and Feta

  • Use boneless, skinless chicken breast that is raised without antibiotics.
  • Buy the best ingredients you can for the topping for the best flavors.
  • Before cooking the chicken, pre-heat the grill and let the chicken come to room temperature.
  • If you don’t have a grill, you can cook the chicken breasts in a pre heated oven.
Chicken breasts with toppings on a large serving platterChicken breasts with toppings on a large serving platter

Be sure to check out these other delicious grilled chicken recipes!

Grilled Chicken Skewers with Indian Marinade

Grilled Chicken with Caribbean Marinade

Lemon and Herb Marinated Grilled Chicken

Grilled Chicken with Asian Marinade

Grilled Chicken with Avocado Salsa by Gimme Delicious

Pesto Marinated Grilled Chicken by Mel’s Kitchen Cafe

If you have tried the Best Grilled Chicken recipe, or any other recipe on my blog, then please rate it and let me know how it turned out in the comments below! You can also FOLLOW ME on FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM and PINTEREST to see more delicious, healthy, family friendly food!

Chicken with Artichokes, Sun Dried Tomatoes and Feta

Create a restaurant quality chicken dinner at home that is packed full of flavor! The best grilled chicken topped with pantry ingredients. It doesn’t get much better than this!

Prep Time40 mins

Cook Time20 mins

Total Time1 hr

Course: Chicken, Main Course, Poultry

Cuisine: Italian, Mediterranean

Keyword: best grilled chicken recipe, grilled chicken with toppings, Italaian chicken recipe

Servings: 4

Calories: 173

  • 4 6-ounce boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (or apple cider vinegar)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced (or 1 teaspoon garlic powder)
  • 2 teaspoons dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2/3 cup marinated artichoke hearts (from a jar packed in oil), drained of oil and roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup sun dried tomatoes (from a jar packed in oil), drained of oil and roughly chopped
  • 2 ounces feta cheese (1/2 cup)
  • In a small bowl, whisk the cider vinegar, garlic, basil, oregano, oil, salt, and pepper. Pour the mixture into a gallon-size resealable plastic bag and add the chicken. Press as much air from the bag as possible and seal. Turn the bag a few times to coat all of the chicken in marinade and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and up to 1 day, turning the bag occasionally to ensure the chicken marinates evenly.

  • Preheat your gas grill with all burners on high and close the lid. When the grill is hot (after about 15 minutes), turn the 2 burners closest to the front to low, keeping the back burner on high. Remove the chicken from the bag and arrange on the grates over the low heat burners. Cover and cook until the underside of the chicken is just beginning to develop light grill marks, 6 to 9 minutes. Flip the chicken, cover, and continue to cook until the chicken is firm to touch, 6 to 9 minutes longer. To get a nice char on the chicken, now move the chicken to the part of the grill over high flames and cook uncovered until each side has solid grill marks, 5 to 6 minutes, flipping halfway. The chicken should be completely firm to the touch and register 160 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer.

  • Transfer the chicken to a plate, tent with foil, and let it rest for 5 minutes before topping with artichokes, sun dried tomatoes, and crumbled feta.

Calories: 173kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 13mg | Sodium: 605mg | Potassium: 179mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 510IU | Vitamin C: 17mg | Calcium: 107mg | Iron: 1.3mg


Credit: Source link

30 Jul

This watermelon feta salad is fresh, fragrant and full of flavor. Easy to make, this is a perfect make ahead salad for summer cookouts. A vibrant side dish that is a real crowd pleaser!

One of my favorite things about hosting summer BBQs is all of the side dishes that I can serve up! They are a great way of adding vibrant colors to the table and I love serving sides in huge bowls so everyone can help themselves! This Watermelon Feta Salad ticks all of the boxes for a great side dish, I can’t wait for you all to try it!

How to make Watermelon Feta Salad

  • In a large bowl, toss the watermelon and cucumber with ½ teaspoon salt. Transfer to a colander set over a large bowl (to catch any liquid that drains) and let it sit for 30 minutes.
  • In a separate large bowl, whisk the scallions, vinegar, ¼ teaspoon of salt, and a generous pinch (⅛ teaspoon) of pepper. Whisk in the oil. Set aside.
  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, add the ears of corn, and cook for 3 minutes. Drain and let cool (you can simultaneously cool the corn and stop the corn from continuing to cook by submerging the ears in a bowl of ice water, but that’s optional.
  • Once cool, use a knife to cut the kernels off of the cob and place them in the bowl with the scallion vinaigrette. Add the drained watermelon and cucumber (discard the liquid), the feta cheese, and basil; toss. Let the salad stand for 30 minutes then taste it and add more salt and/or pepper to suit your preference. Serve.
Watermelon in a colander Watermelon in a colander

Easy Summer Salad Side Dish

There’s nothing quite like a fresh salad on a hot summer day, and this watermelon feta salad really does hit the spot! The succulent watermelon immediately cools you down and the fresh corn has a subtle sweetness to it. It’s so colorful and bright to, and sure to please your guests!

Make Ahead Watermelon Feta Salad

One of my favorite things about this salad is that it’s perfect to make ahead of the time and keep it covered in the fridge. It will keep for two days, so it’s great if you have lots of other prep to do. It also means that the leftovers stay fresh and tasty!

What to serve with Watermelon Feta Salad

This salad will not be out of place at any cookout along side all your favourites, like a pasta salad and a green leafy salad. Serve it with in a big bowl in the middle of the table with your cooked grilled meat. I would also wager, that this would make and excellent accompaniment to fish taco or serve alongside fries and a burger.

Mixing watermelon feta salad in a glass bowlMixing watermelon feta salad in a glass bowl

Top tips for making Watermelon Feta Salad

  • Be sure to salt the watermelon and cucumber and let them sit in a colander set inside a larger bowl to drain. Since both watermelon and cucumber are high in water, the salt draws out any excess moisture and prevents the salad from becoming too watery.
  • Dress the salad in a simple mix of scallions, apple cider vinegar, salt, pepper, and olive oil to let the flavors sing.
  • The salad can be refrigerated for up to 2 days.

Be sure to check out these other summer salad recipes!

Every day Side Salad

Chicken Bacon Ranch Salad

Whole Grain Salad with Salmon and Feta

Broccoli Salad with Apricot and Pecans

Grilled Shrimp Salad by Rachel cooks

Spinach Strawberry Salad by Well Plated

Watermelon feta salad in a serving dishWatermelon feta salad in a serving dish

If you have tried this Watermelon Feta Salad recipe, or any other recipe on my blog, then please rate it and let me know how it turned out in the comments below! You can also FOLLOW ME on FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM and PINTEREST to see more delicious, healthy, family friendly food!

Watermelon Corn Salad with Basil and Feta

This watermelon feta salad is fresh, fragrant and full of flavor. Easy to make, this is a perfect make ahead salad for summer cookouts. A vibrant side dish that is a real crowd pleaser!

Prep Time40 mins

Cook Time5 mins

Total Time45 mins

Course: party food, Salads, Side Dish, Vegetarian

Cuisine: American

Keyword: corn salad recipe, salad side dish, watermelon salad recipe

Servings: 6

Calories: 89

  • 2 cups watermelon cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 medium cucumber peeled, seeded, and chopped into 1/2-inch cubes
  • salt
  • pepper
  • 3 ears corn shucked
  • 2 medium scallions finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 ounces feta cheese crumbled
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves chopped
  • In a large bowl, toss the watermelon and cucumber with ½ teaspoon salt. Transfer to a colander set over a large bowl (to catch any liquid that drains) and let it sit for 30 minutes.

  • In a separate large bowl, whisk the scallions, vinegar, ¼ teaspoon of salt, and a generous pinch (⅛ teaspoon) of pepper. Whisk in the oil. Set aside.

  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, add the ears of corn, and cook for 3 minutes. Drain and let cool (you can simultaneously cool the corn and stop the corn from continuing to cook by submerging the ears in a bowl of ice water, but that’s optional.

  • Once cool, use a knife to cut the kernels off of the cob and place them in the bowl with the scallion vinaigrette. Add the drained watermelon and cucumber (discard the liquid), the feta cheese, and basil; toss. Let the salad stand for 30 minutes then taste it and add more salt and/or pepper to suit your preference. Serve.

The salad can be refrigerated for up to 2 days.

Calories: 89kcal | Carbohydrates: 6g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 8mg | Sodium: 302mg | Potassium: 116mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 455IU | Vitamin C: 6.3mg | Calcium: 60mg | Iron: 0.4mg


Credit: Source link

02 Jul

This Greek dip has so much flavor, with a layer of smooth, savory hummus, a layer of cool, herby tzatziki, and toppings like feta cheese, chopped fresh cucumbers, sweet tomatoes, and briney capers and olives.

This post is sponsored by Stonyfield. All opinions are my own.

If you’ve had hummus—and I’m guessing you have—you know that it’s a chickpea purée with savory, slightly nutty flavor. Here I’ve paired it with Mediterranean staples like yogurt (tzatziki), feta, and fresh herbs to make one fragrant and flavorful Greek dip.

Greek Dip with Hummus and Tzatziki (134 calories) - a flavor-packed appetizer you can make a head of time! One layer of smooth, savory hummus, a layer of cool, herby tzatziki, and toppings like feta cheese, chopped fresh cucumbers, sweet tomatoes, and briney capers and olives.Greek Dip with Hummus and Tzatziki (134 calories) - a flavor-packed appetizer you can make a head of time! One layer of smooth, savory hummus, a layer of cool, herby tzatziki, and toppings like feta cheese, chopped fresh cucumbers, sweet tomatoes, and briney capers and olives.

The rich hummus layer is balanced and brightened by the zippy yogurt tzatziki layer. If you’re not familiar with it, tzatziki is a mix of yogurt, grated cucumber, fresh mint, dill (optional), and garlic. It’s fragrant and refreshing and happens to be an excellent match for the toppings I use in this Greek dip: creamy crumbled feta cheese, chopped cucumber and sweet grape tomatoes for freshness, and briney capers and olives.

Stonyfield greek nonfat yogurtStonyfield greek nonfat yogurt

What Kind of Yogurt To Use for Tzatziki

Since the yogurt is the base of tzatziki, it matters which kind you use. You want a thick and creamy Greek yogurt with a smooth, mild tang. That signature tang is part of what makes Greek yogurt taste brighter and fresher than other kinds of yogurt (it’s also much thicker than traditional yogurt since it’s strained), and I really enjoy it, but sometimes nonfat Greek yogurt, specifically, is a little too tangy—so tangy that it flat-out overpowers other flavors and yogurt mix-ins. But not Stonyfield nonfat Greek yogurt. Stonyfield’s nonfat Greek yogurt is creamy and perfectly balanced, rich and refreshing without any sort of dominating tartness. When I first tried it, I went back to the fridge to check the container, thinking I had gotten whole milk yogurt by mistake—that’s how rich and creamy it is.

“Organic” Makes a Difference

Last month I took a three-day trip up to Vermont with Stonyfield—the brand whose yogurt I bought for the first time thirteen years ago, just after I had lost 135 pounds and started caring about what kinds of food I was putting into my body. And before I left for the trip, my best friend asked me if I was planning to tell the Stonyfield team that I was their number one consumer in 2006 and 2007 (and beyond, but we lived together in those years so she saw firsthand how obsessed I was with their yogurt). I laughed at the time she asked, but then yes of course I told them.

Truth is, there are three things I’ve always liked about Stonyfield’s yogurt: the taste, the simplicity of ingredients, and the fact that all of their yogurt is organic. Those first two are easy and understandable, but the third—the organic piece—is something that I didn’t know as much about as I thought I did, until I got the chance to explore the organic dairy farms that produce the milk Stonyfield uses to make their yogurts. Like a lot of us I’m sure, my concept of “organic” was more of a list of things that organic foods DON’T have.

NO toxic persistent pesticides
NO synthetic fertilizers
NO GMOs
NO artificial growth hormones or antibiotics in the animals
NO artificial colors
NO artificial flavors
NO artificial preservatives

There’s a lot more to it. During my time in Vermont, I visited two dairy farms: Wonder Why Farm and Molly Brook Farm—both of which are certified organic. You might have heard by now that when it comes to food, the word “Natural” has no regulated definition. “Organic,” on the other hand, is defined and regulated by the USDA—and that certification means a lot. From the land on which an organic product is grown to the producers growing it, from the post-harvest facilities preparing the product to the processing and handling facilities transforming the product, each step must be certified to federal organic standards. Once an operation is certified, organic producers and handlers undergo annual reviews and inspections.

Organic Milk from Organic Cows

All certified organic dairy products come from cows that are pasture-raised. The organic milk in all of Stonyfield’s products comes from family farms with an average herd size of 75-90 cows.

The organic standard requires that all dairy cows get 30% of their Dry Matter Intake from pasture and actively graze at least 120 days a year. The farmers feed their livestock only organic feed, hay, or pasture and maintain conditions to accommodate the health and natural behavior of the animal. The animal welfare is the piece of the organic label that mattered most to me. I loved that visiting these farms allowed me to see these cows being treated well and hearing from the farmers that, as long as they come in to be milked regularly, the cows are free to pasture as much they like. (Bonus: when cows are actively grazing on pasture, their milk contains 62% higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids than conventional milk.)

Organic Farming and the Environment

Organic agriculture is based on practices that not only protect environmental health, but also strive to improve it. Organic farmers enrich soil and control pests with crop rotation, cover crops, beneficial insects, and compost. By prohibiting the use of petroleum-based fertilizers and absorbing carbon dioxide from the air, organic agriculture helps to reduce our carbon footprint and combat climate change.

My Takeaway

Stonyfield has integrity, a kind of integrity you hear about all the time from businesses and brands, but don’t often see put into practice. It’s clearer to me now than ever that they really do think about the impact of everything they do—from the care they provide to the farmer families and their cows to the ingredients in their yogurt, the packaging it’s in, and how it gets to our grocery stores. I can’t applaud that enough. They make me feel good about the products I’m choosing—especially the yogurt I’m giving to James (he’s a major fan of the YoBaby Veggie purple carrot flavor)—and I like knowing that when I buy their products, I’m in some incredibly small way supporting a greater wellness for all of us.

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Greek Dip

This Greek dip has so much flavor, with a layer of smooth, savory hummus, a layer of cool, herby tzatziki, and toppings like feta cheese, chopped fresh cucumbers, sweet tomatoes, and briney capers and olives.

  • Author: Andie Mitchell
  • Prep Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 10 1x
  • Category: Appetizers
  • Cuisine: Greek

Scale

Ingredients

For the Tzatziki:
½ medium cucumber, peeled, halved lengthwise, and seeded
1 cup Stonyfield plain nonfat Greek yogurt
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh mint leaves
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill
1 small garlic clove, very finely minced
Pinch salt
Pinch freshly ground black pepper

Hummus and Toppings:
1 (10-ounce) container prepared hummus
½ medium cucumber, peeled and chopped
⅔ cup Grape tomatoes, quartered
2 heaping tablespoons capers (from a jar of capers in water)
½ cup kalamata olives, pitted and chopped
2 ounces feta cheese, crumbled (1/2 cup)

Instructions

Using the large holes on a box grater, grate the cucumber. Wrap the grated cucumber in paper towel and squeeze gently to remove excess moisture.

In a medium bowl, mix the grated cucumber, yogurt, olive oil, mint, dill, garlic, salt, and pepper. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes. (The tzatziki can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.)

Spread the hummus on the bottom of a large shallow bowl, layer the tzatziki over the hummus, and sprinkle the toppings over the tzatziki: chopped cucumber and tomatoes, capers, olives, and crumbled feta cheese. Serve with pita bread (cut into triangles) or pita chips.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1/3 cup
  • Calories: 134
  • Sugar: 4g
  • Sodium: 431mg
  • Fat: 10g
  • Saturated Fat: 2g
  • Carbohydrates: 9g
  • Fiber: 1g
  • Protein: 5g
  • Cholesterol: 6mg

Credit: Source link

25 Jun

A Tuscan bread salad made with toasted sourdough bread, fresh veggies, roasted red peppers, white beans, and fragrant herbs in a bright, lemony dressing (190 calories or 4 WW points).

This post is sponsored by Grain Foods Foundation.

This vegetarian panzanella salad is a showstopper in so many ways—it’s seasonal, beautiful, and full of flavor and texture, with ripe tomatoes, sweet roasted red peppers, peppery arugula, fresh parsley and basil, and cubes of toasted sourdough bread. Adding canned white beans boosts the protein and staying power, but you could seamlessly swap them for chopped rotisserie chicken if you aren’t vegetarian. As for the vinaigrette, it’s simple: lemon, garlic, salt, and olive oil.

To soften the bite of the fresh garlic in the vinaigrette, you’ll mince it as finely as you can, combine it with the salt and fresh lemon juice, and then let that mixture sit while you toast the bread and prepare the veggies. You’ll whisk in the olive oil just before pouring it onto the panzanella salad.

Sourdough Panzanella with Roasted Red Peppers and White Beans  Sourdough Panzanella with Roasted Red Peppers and White Beans

Now, bread is the base of any panzanella salad. It’s what elevates it from light side salad to substantial main course. But if you’re hesitant to include bread in your salads—or your life—I get it. I’m prone to black-and-white thinking, too, especially when it comes to food and health, and especially these days, when carbs aren’t viewed in the most favorable light. From my own experience though, which now includes a number of periods in which I cut out carbs completely, the feeling of restriction only led me to obsessively think about the food I was missing…and eventually binge on them at one point or another. It’s my own cautionary tale of going carb-free. If you can relate, then maybe we should consider that finding a way to fit all of our favorite foods into our lives and diets is sometimes the most beneficial thing we can do for our mental and physical health. #YesToBread

Sourdough Panzanella with Roasted Red Peppers and White Beans  Sourdough Panzanella with Roasted Red Peppers and White Beans

Now, why sourdough? Two reasons, actually. First, the flavor. Sourdough has an unmistakable (and irresistible) yeasty tang to it, so it complements all of the refreshing Mediterranean flavors here. Second, since sourdough has a thick, chewy crust and a somewhat sturdy structure, it can hold up to the moisture of the other ingredients. Yes, it will soften and absorb more of the dressing over time, but it won’t turn to mush like a more delicate white bread would.

Sourdough Panzanella with Roasted Red Peppers and White Beans  Sourdough Panzanella with Roasted Red Peppers and White Beans

Sourdough Panzanella Salad with Roasted Red Peppers and White Beans

A Tuscan bread salad made with toasted sourdough bread, fresh veggies, roasted red peppers, white beans, and fragrant herbs in a bright, lemony dressing.

Prep Time10 mins

Cook Time15 mins

Course: Salads

Keyword: bread salad, panzanella recipe, panzanella salad

Servings: 6 servings

Calories: 190kcal

  • 4 cups cubed sourdough bread3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oilSalt and pepper3 tablespoons lemon juice1 garlic clove very finely minced 1 large ripe tomato, cored and cut into 3/4-inch pieces4 jarred roasted red peppers (packed in water), chopped½ English cucumber, peeled and chopped1 cup canned cannellini beans, rinsed and drained (any small white bean)2 cups arugula¼ cup chopped fresh basil¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

  • In a small bowl, whisk the lemon juice, garlic, and ⅛ teaspoon (a pinch) salt. Let the mixture stand while you toast the bread.

  • On a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the bread cubes with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, spread them out, and bake until golden, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool slightly before adding to the salad.

  • In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes, roasted peppers, cucumber, beans, arugula, basil, and parsley. Add toasted bread cubes to the bowl with vegetables. Whisk the remaining 2 tablespoons oil into the lemon-garlic mixture and add it to the salad. Toss and season with additional salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately.

1 serving (1/6 of recipe): 4 WW Freestyle points

Calories: 190kcal | Carbohydrates: 24g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 362mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 4g

Credit: Source link

25 Jun

These almond raspberry cheesecake bars have only 190 calories or 8 WW points per bar, and yet they’re rich, creamy, and memorable, with a hint of almond extract and a sweet, tart raspberry jam swirl.

The base, made from a mix of almond flour and all purpose flour, is like a buttery, crumbly cross between shortbread and chewy sugar cookie, and the cheesecake layer, made with low-fat cream cheese, is silky-smooth, scented with almond extract, and swirled with sweet raspberry jam.

low fat cheesecake bar recipelow fat cheesecake bar recipe

To make lighter raspberry cheesecake bars with great flavor and fewer calories, I do two things. First, I use low-fat cream cheese (do not use fat-free), which is slightly tangier than full-fat but that tang actually works very well here, balancing the buttery base and the sweet raspberry jam. Second, I simply make thinner bars—almost a 50/50 split of filling and crust—and with all the rich, creamy flavor, you won’t even notice.

low fat cheesecake bar recipelow fat cheesecake bar recipe

To make sure that your cheesecake bar crust is firm and sturdy, take your time mixing the flours with the melted butter, stirring and mashing the mixture until all of the flour is coated and it resembles damp sand or a thick paste. Use your fingers to press the mixture firmly into the bottom of your pan, packing it into an even, cohesive layer.

Enjoy!

low fat cheesecake bar recipelow fat cheesecake bar recipe

 

Lighter Almond Raspberry Cheesecake Bars

These almond raspberry cheesecake bars have only 190 calories or 8 WW points per bar, and yet they’re rich, creamy, and memorable, with a hint of almond extract and a sweet, tart raspberry jam swirl.

Prep Time15 mins

Cook Time35 mins

cool30 mins

Total Time50 mins

Course: Dessert

Cuisine: American

Keyword: cheesecake bars, lighter cheesecake, raspberry cheesecake bars

Servings: 12 bars

Calories: 190kcal

Crust:

  • .75 c almond flour
  • .5 c all purpose flour
  • 2 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 4 tbsp unsalted butter melted

Cheesecake Layer:

  • 8 oz cream cheese softened
  • .5 c sugar
  • 2 tsp 2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 1 large egg
  • .5 tsp almond extract
  • 3 tbsp seedless raspberry jam
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a 9-inch square baking pan with foil and spray the bottom and sides with nonstick cooking spray.

  • In a large bowl, whisk the almond flour, all purpose flour, and sugar. Stir in the melted butter, mixing well to create a thick paste. Press the mixture firmly and evenly into the bottom of your lined pan. Bake for 14 minutes.

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the cream cheese. Add the sugar and lemon zest and mix until combined. Add the egg and almond extract and beat until smooth. Pour over the hot crust, pushing the batter to the sides of the pan and smoothing the top. In a small bowl, stir the raspberry jam to soften and loosen it. Drop spoonfuls of jam over the cream cheese layer and use a toothpick or butter knife to gently swirl the jam (be careful not to hit the crust. Bake until the center of the cheesecake is set but has a slight jiggle to it, about 20 minutes. Let the bars cool on a wire rack for 30 minutes then refrigerate until thoroughly chilled before cutting and serving.

1 bar: 8 WW Freestyle points

Serving: 1bar | Calories: 190kcal | Carbohydrates: 21g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Cholesterol: 36mg | Sodium: 78mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 15g

Credit: Source link

25 Jun

(By Daniel)

He was a sweet and agreeable boy from the moment he entered the world. He didn’t cry when they gave him an IV an hour after he was born. He was happy to let anyone hold him. He didn’t mind diaper changes. He tolerated any amount of noise or light. Like most newborns he only seemed to care about two things: he wanted to be well fed and he wanted to be held while he slept.

So we held him—and we were happy to do it. There is no better feeling than your newborn snuggling up against you, peacefully snoozing away. After some time, we would set him down and he would usually stay asleep for anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour. But we were prepared for this. I splurged and bought a Snoo smart sleeper for 800 dollars. We planned to swaddle him, hook him safely into the snoo, and let the magic robot rock him gently as he slept through the night. But James had other plans. He disliked the Snoo. We kept trying to get him used to it and sometimes he would take to it. But mostly he just wanted to be held.

When we set him down in Snoo, he would wake. When we set him down in the crib, he would wake. But when we set him down in the Leachco Podster, gifted to us at our baby shower, he stayed asleep. It was a blessing. Eventually, our reliance on it would pose problems, but it was a lifesaver at the beginning. In the early days we would put it in between us in the bed. I would generally stay up on my laptop in the bed while he and Andie slept because he was still waking frequently to eat. Andie would get up early and takeover before dawn. Since he was almost always supervised and couldn’t roll over, we were ok with letting him sleep in the podster from a safety perspective.

We eventually moved him into the nursery after several months. We kept trying to reintroduce the Snoo, and it worked occasionally, but never as well as the Podster. Our nighttime routine was difficult but manageable. We would bathe him, swaddle him, feed him, read him a story, and then rock him to sleep. Once he was asleep for awhile, I would gently put him down in the Podster which sat inside his crib. I just am not the type of person who can sleep, wake, and go back to sleep easily. So I still stayed up for the night shift and watched him on the monitor. He was waking three times a night to eat, between 7pm and 5am, up until about 4.5 months, when he went down to two night feedings. After his feedings, he would generally go back down pretty easily.

It wasn’t the best situation. Me staying up all night and sleeping until noon was not ideal. We were nervous about him becoming too used to sleeping in the pod. We were still swaddling because he refused to sleep unswaddled. But he could turn over, so I had to watch him the whole time he was sleeping. It was working…until it wasn’t. At seven months old, he started to wake more and more frequently—crying and only going back to sleep if I held him and rocked him. Then he started to try to turn over in the pod, which was worrying, so we decided we needed to transition him out of the swaddle and out of the pod and into the crib.

At first, I tried a bunch of things in an attempt to make the transition less jarring. I bought a crib wedge to give him some elevation, like he was used to. I bought several different types of swaddles and wearable blankets that would allow us to take out one arm at a time. I continued to rock him and sat in his room all night to comfort him if he started to get upset. But none of it was working. He was sleeping worse, waking more, and becoming more and more irritable.

We discussed the situation with his pediatrician and she recommended sleep training, specifically Ferberizing. It was the same recommendation that Andie’s OBGYN gave her when they discussed how James was sleeping. We looked into this type of sleep training, where you let your baby cry and try to self-soothe for a set number of minutes and at specific intervals, and after talking it over we just weren’t entirely comfortable doing it. But at some point the situation had become untenable. He wasn’t sleeping. I was sitting in his room and rocking him all night long.

We still weren’t comfortable committing to a cry-it-out method, so I looked into other sleep training methods. I didn’t have a solid plan but on one particularly bad night I decided I had to try something. I took the swaddle off of him, fed him another bottle, and rocked him until he was drowsy. I kissed him, said goodnight, then I set him on his back in the crib and left the room. I just wanted to see how he would react and then formulate a plan from there.

He stayed quietly on his back for a few minutes—eyes wide, seeming a bit confused about what was going on. Then he started crying. I told myself I’d wait three minutes to give him a chance to self-soothe. Andie joined me in the hallway outside his door and agreed to my experiment. He kept crying for three minutes and I went in and gave him his pacifier and rubbed his head and then left the room again. He cried again and this time I said I’d give him five minutes. He kept crying but a few times de-escalated and seemed to almost calm himself down before starting up again. I went back in after five minutes and told him I loved him and it was time to sleep and left again. At this point Andie was bawling. I told her I’d give it another five minutes and then I’d rock him to sleep. After 4 more minutes of crying, it just didn’t seem like he was going to be able to do it. Andie and I both realized that sleep training wasn’t really for us. It was unbearable. We moved toward his door, my hand on the doorknob, when suddenly the crying stopped. On the monitor we watched as James rolled over on his stomach and went to sleep. That night he only woke up once to eat, and went right back down to sleep after.

The next night I did the same bed time routine and put him down in the crib and left the room. He cried for about 15 seconds before going to sleep. He never cried for more than 30 seconds to a minute after that point. Now he usually goes right to sleep when I put him down without crying at all. He sleeps from 7 to 3, I feed and change him, then he goes back down until around 6. It’s rare to hear any crying from him at all during the night.

So technically we did use a cry-it-out method of sleep training even though when Andie talks about it she always says we did “light” sleep training. But honestly, we just got very lucky that James adapted so quickly. I’m not confident enough to say sleep training is good or bad, right or wrong. Personally, I wasn’t comfortable doing it at all before he was over six months. And I’m not sure I would have been able to stick with it. Andie had already told me on night one that James could just sleep in our bed forever, so it’s safe to say she wouldn’t have wanted to stick with it either. But I do think it’s a viable option for older babies who are having trouble sleeping. It can be upsetting, but healthy sleep is really important for parents and babies. I think it worked for us because he was ready. He wanted to sleep on his stomach and his previous set up wasn’t allowing him to do that so once he figured out that he had the freedom to sleep in his preferred position (knees tucked in with his butt in the air and his face pressed against the mattress) he was able to sleep soundly.

Figuring out nighttime sleep was great progress for us. Now if only we could set him down for his naps. During the day, we either hold him and rock him or drive him around in the car while playing “Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes” on repeat. I’m sure he’ll let us know when he’s ready. Hopefully it’s before college.

Credit: Source link

24 Jun

If you’re looking for a new, flavor-packed marinade for grilled chicken, give this fragrant Indian marinade a try! Made with curry powder, turmeric, coriander, garlic, lemon, and cilantro, it infuses grilled chicken skewers with lots of rich, warm, complex flavor. Add a cool, refreshing cucumber raita (yogurt sauce) to round out the meal (250 calories or 3 WW points)!

In the spring and summertime, I’m outside almost every night, grilling chicken with lemon herb marinade, Asian soy ginger marinade, Caribbean marinade, or making Mediterranean grilled shrimp…even steak tips. And now I’m adding a new marinade recipe to the list—a flavorful and fragrant Indian marinade for chicken. I like to turn them into grilled chicken skewers, but the marinade works well for any type of chicken or cooking method.

The Indian marinade is straightforward: whisk together curry powder, ground turmeric, ground coriander, garlic, lemon juice, fresh cilantro, salt, pepper, and olive oil. The lemon works to tenderize the meat, while the garlic, herbs, and spices infuse the chicken with warm, earthy, complex flavor. Curry powder, after all, is typically a blend of coriander, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek, chili peppers, and sometimes ginger, cinnamon, cloves, and more. The combination of all of these fragrant spices creates a richness and depth of flavor that you just couldn’t get with one or two spices alone.

Combine the marinade with chicken breast tenderloins (or whole chicken breasts that you cut into thin strips) and let them marinate for at least an hour and up to 24 hours. You can thread the chicken on metal or wooden skewers—or skip them altogether if you don’t have any skewers— and grill until the chicken is cooked through and has a crisp, golden brown char from the grill. Remember that if you plan to use wooden skewers, they need to be soaked in water for 30 minutes before using.

As a cool, creamy complement to the flavorful Indian marinade, I like to make an easy cucumber raita—an Indian yogurt sauce—to serve alongside them. The mix of plain whole-milk yogurt, finely chopped cucumber, cilantro, garlic, salt, and a pinch of cayenne, adds the perfect amount of tang and freshness to our Indian chicken skewers.

Enjoy!

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Grilled Chicken Skewers with Indian Marinade and Cucumber Raita

  • Author: Andie Mitchell
  • Prep Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1x
  • Category: Poultry
  • Method: Grilling
  • Cuisine: Indian

Scale

Ingredients

For the cucumber raita:
1 cup plain whole-milk yogurt
1/3 of a medium cucumber, peeled and finely chopped
2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro leaves
1 garlic clove, minced (about 1 teaspoon)
Pinch salt
Pinch freshly ground black pepper

For the grilled chicken skewers:
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons curry powder
½ teaspoon turmeric
¼ teaspoon coriander
½ teaspoon salt
Pinch fresh ground black pepper
1 ¼ pounds chicken breast tenderloins

Instructions

In a gallon-sized resealable plastic bag, combine the olive oil, lemon juice, cilantro, garlic, curry powder, turmeric, coriander, salt, and pepper. Add the chicken, press as much air out of the bag as you can, and seal it. Turn the bag in your hands, massaging the marinade into the chicken and making sure that all of the pieces are covered. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to 24 hours. **If you plan to use wooden skewers, soak them in water for 30 minutes before using.

Make the raita. Blot the chopped cucumber with paper towels to remove excess moisture, then place the cucumber in a small bowl. Add the yogurt, cilantro, garlic, salt, and pepper. Optional: add a pinch of cayenne for a touch of heat. Stir, cover, and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Preheat your gas grill with all burners on high and close the lid. When the grill is hot (after about 15 minutes), turn the 2 burners closest to the front to low, keeping the back burner on high. Remove the chicken from the bag and thread the tenderloins on the skewers (dividing the chicken evenly among the skewers). Arrange the skewers on the grates over the low heat burners. Cover and cook until the underside of the chicken is just beginning to develop light grill marks, about 6 minutes. Flip the chicken, cover, and continue to cook until the chicken is firm to touch, about 6 minutes longer. To get a nice char on the chicken, now move the chicken to the part of the grill over high flames and cook uncovered until each side has solid grill marks, 5 to 6 minutes, flipping halfway. The chicken should be completely firm to the touch and register 160 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer. Transfer the skewers to a plate, tent with foil, and let rest for 5 minutes before serving alongside the cucumber raita.

Notes

Nutrition for 1 serving grilled chicken with cucumber raita (1/4 of the chicken and yogurt sauce): 3 WW Freestyle points

Nutrition for 1 serving of chicken *without* cucumber raita: 1 WW Freestyle point //
215 calories, 7g fat, 1g sat fat, 103mg cholesterol, 356mg sodium, 2g carbs, 0g fiber, 32g protein

Nutrition

  • Calories: 250
  • Sugar: 3g
  • Sodium: 384mg
  • Fat: 9g
  • Saturated Fat: 3g
  • Carbohydrates: 4g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Protein: 34g
  • Cholesterol: 110mg

Keywords: Indian marinade, grilled chicken, curry chicken

Credit: Source link

18 Jun

I hope you had a happy Father’s Day! James and I hunted down a gigantic card for Daniel (the bigger the better) and made him a keto coconut macadamia nut cheesecake. We went out to a hibachi steak house with both of our families and quickly realized it was all really a treat for James. He sat in a high chair pulled right up to the counter (the ideal height for him to chew on the edge of that counter) and was mesmerized the whole time. He also figured out how to drink water from a straw, sort of, so that made his day. As we were leaving, my grandmother said, “James is just a pleasure.” It’s true. He is! We can thank his dad for that gorgeous temperament and while we’re at it, let’s thank him for being the love of our lives.

James loving hibachi

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What Really Happened to Malaysia’s Missing Airplane
Five years ago, the flight vanished into the Indian Ocean. Officials on land know more about why than they dare to say.

“In truth, a lot can now be known with certainty about the fate of MH370. First, the disappearance was an intentional act. It is inconceivable that the known flight path, accompanied by radio and electronic silence, was caused by any combination of system failure and human error.”

LISTEN

22 Hours: An American Nightmare
It was a case nightmares are made of. A D.C. power couple, their 10-year-old son and housekeeper held hostage for nearly 24 hours and murdered inside a burning D.C. mansion. WTOP examines the complicated trail of evidence that police say led to finding their killer and why they say he committed such a brutal crime.

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Fleabag (Amazon)
This British dramedy (more comedy than drama), written by and starring Phoebe Waller-Bridge, is hilarious and refreshing. I don’t typically love shows that break the fourth wall, but here it’s done so well that I can’t complain. The show is about a young woman (Waller-Bridge) trying to cope with life in London while coming to terms with a recent tragedy.
Watch the trailer here.

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Grilled Chicken Skewers with Indian Marinade and Cucumber Raita
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Credit: Source link