August 20, 2019 // Archive

Date based archive
20 Aug

For the full story, please read all our previous posts: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10, Part 11, Part 12, Part 13, Part 14, Part 15

 

 

 

Actual footage of me trying to make it through this thing called life. 😂

 


Isn’t it true though? We all start out so sure, “this is going to be the best to be an adult! I’m going to marry the perfect man for me, we will have darling children, he will always put his arm around me and tell me I’m beautiful and life will be easier because we have each other. 😍

And then suddenly life hits and you’re not so sure you’ll ever come up for air again.

In order to truly understand why I was able to hold on, to fight with real grit to follow what we felt in our hearts, to have hope and faith and to find joy in the chaos we have to pause the story of our house and move backward in time to when we were deciding to have this little girl and the real trials that almost broke us.

We had no idea with our first that I had Hyperemesis Gravidarum. My doctor wasn’t very good and kept telling me to “buck up” over the phone. He hadn’t even seen me yet. I had lost 18lbs by the time I had my first appointment, later was admitted with black lips from dehydration and still he’d tell me morning sickness was normal. Friends, HG ain’t morning sickness. 🙄

Having another made me nervous but I thought FOR SURE it won’t be that bad again and I’d find new ways to feel better. 😂😂 seems so naive to say that now.

I felt pulled to find a new doctor not realizing he would become our everything. I searched online, saw his picture and felt burning inside my chest. I called, put myself down as a new patient and thought nothing more.

🤢 I made dinner one night for Cade and our oldest and almost immediately was heaving my guts up in the bathroom. It continued all week, all day long but it was too early to show on a pregnancy test. I called the doctor almost a week later and in a moment of mercy he said to come in for a blood test. At that appointment he said, and I’ll never forget this, “Carrian I feel this is probably going to be HG.” He explained and the lights came on in us.

Immediately it was confirmed I was pregnant and I was sent to IV therapy.

One day later Cade came home after being gone 20 min for work.

“I got to work and there was a note on the door that we are unemployed.”

 

A photo of two boys and a bucket full of water and crabs.A photo of two boys and a bucket full of water and crabs.

 

This photo was taken in Burano, Italy two summers ago. We thought it was such a sweet scene until we realized what those boys were really doing.

There we were, strolling along the waterways and gazing at vibrant, perfectly lined colorful houses and these darling boys plopped a big bucket of crabs down. “Ahhhhh they caught tonight’s dinner or will sell them at a market!”

Joyfully mr gray shirt bends over, snags a crab by the leg and flops him upside down on the ledge. Immediately they began smashing it!! There he was, minding his own business, trying so hard to live a good crabby life and then someone decided to smash his hopes, dreams and 😬 well his body.

That was us over 9 years ago…

Cade’s words:
Looking back, I can still feel that heaviness I felt then, suddenly we were not able to afford even the most basic groceries and necessities of life. We had a toddler, we were just out of college so no real savings, a car having issue after issue in repairs, and, a wife with a high risk pregnancy and now no insurance to help cover the hospital stays, weekly dr visits etc.

As a husband and father I felt the weight of my family depending on me. Basically the whole world was sitting on my shoulders.

One year passed and still no job. All I could think was, it’s me, I’m the problem. Have I been looking in the wrong places? Was I not searching far enough or hard enough? Had I chosen the wrong career path? What was I doing wrong and how could I fix it?

When you’re choosing the right and trying so hard for a righteous desire, why can’t it happen? We weren’t asking for anything crazy, we just wanted to live righteously and provide for our family.

My world felt pretty dark at that time.

 

A photo of Cade and I holding hands, walking, and looking at each other taken from behind us.

A photo of Cade and I holding hands, walking, and looking at each other taken from behind us.A photo of Cade and I holding hands, walking, and looking at each other taken from behind us.

 

There’s nothing worse than watching your husband struggle and suffer and not be able to do anything to help. I could see in his countenance that this was hitting him square in the chest, he felt worthless and lost and I couldn’t do anything to take that from him.

But, we can both see how incredibly essential these trials have been in our lives.

I remember coming around the corner to our bedroom months after delivering our 2nd baby and catching my breath to see Cade kneeling at our bedside in the middle of the day.

Have you ever looked into your strong, happy, hopeful husband’s eyes and seen stress, discouragement and confusion? And what can you do?!!

It has now been well over a year, we were living off our food storage and there he was, kneeling in one last cry for help.

And that moment, a moment when he was at the bottom of the pit, bruised and broken, nowhere to look but up, well I’ll let him tell you.

“In one last cry for help I learned truths that have changed who I am, who we are as a family.”

Which is exactly why I turn to face the rain now. My goodness, I’ve still had moments on my knees, begging to understand or hurting from something but I always can say, “Thy will be done. Teach me, give me faith to do this!! I TRUST YOU!!!”

To be continued…

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Credit: Source link

20 Aug

US editor W. Blake Gray visits a “retail store” in LA that doesn’t seem to exist.

Amazon is openly flouting California liquor law.

In February, Amazon, doing business as Prime Now, was issued a liquor license to open a liquor store in Los Angeles. California requires businesses that offer alcohol for home delivery to have a brick-and-mortar store. So Amazon got a license for a store that would be in the same building as its enormous Prime Now warehouse in an industrial part of north Los Angeles.

Prime Now’s license specifically requires the store to stay open for half of the hours that Amazon does liquor deliveries from its warehouse. Amazon offers deliveries for 16 hours per day; therefore, it must be open for eight hours. There are other requirements, including offering for sale any bottle of wine or spirits that it offers for delivery from the warehouse.

I reported on the existence of this Amazon “secret store” last week. My editor and I pored over Google Earth images of the address and we didn’t see anything that looks like a store. That piqued my interest, and I convinced my editor to splurge for an airplane ticket and some Uber fares for me to go visit this store.

I thought it might be a closet-sized space with one employee, or something like that. The license doesn’t require the store to actually have all the merchandise in the store; they could have an iPad catalog and they could fetch the liquor from the warehouse, and that would be legal. I thought I’d jet down there, buy a bottle of rye whiskey, have some good LA food (finally I checked out the natural wine list at Night & Market Song), and write a story. Tentative headline: “I bought a bottle of rye whiskey at Amazon’s Secret Store.” People would read that, I thought.

This is key: I picked out what I wanted to buy ahead of time by looking carefully at what Amazon offers for delivery from the warehouse. Prime Now offers liquor deliveries in the warehouse’s zip code from three places: Amazon (the warehouse), Whole Foods and Mission Wine & Spirits. The “store” would only be required, under California law, to offer the same wines and spirits delivered from Amazon, not from Whole Foods or Mission.

Amazon’s wine selection from its Los Angeles warehouse sucks: no wines from Alsace, Rias Baixas, Roero or Lugano (it was hot when I first looked and I was in a white-wine mood.) I decided I would get a bottle of Templeton Rye Whiskey that Amazon offers through Prime Now for $30.99. I saved some screenshots of the products offered – this is also key, because it’s possible that Amazon will change its practices after publication of this story.

I got to the warehouse, which is enormous. My Uber driver had a little trouble finding the full address I gave him, so he dropped me nearby. There’s no Prime Now liquor store listed on the large sign on the street for the industrial complex. And guess what?

THERE IS NO LIQUOR STORE THERE.

Amazon is openly flouting the conditions it agreed to just six months ago.

I wanted to be sure, even though the building has several No Trespassing Private Property signs. I thought maybe the store was inside the warehouse. And I wanted to be thorough.

The address of the Prime Now “store” on its license from the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) is 3334 N San Fernando Rd Unit 101. There’s only one other business at 3334 N San Fernando Road: an air-conditioning company called Goodman Distribution. I walked in and asked if they are Unit 101. They’re Unit 102, I was told; helpfully, they explained that Unit 101 is on the exact opposite side of the building.

There is a door at that corner, and it’s forbidding. A sign reads “Associate Entrance.” There’s also a sign that reads “Restricted Area. No Trespassing. Private Property. Authorized Personnel Only.”

Not exactly open to the public.

I knew I would try to open the door despite that sign, but I wanted to check every other possibility first.

Amazon has jumped into the private delivery business in a big way. Many private individuals bring what look like their own cars to the warehouse to pick up deliveries. There’s an entrance for them – Amazon Flex Delivery Partners – so I went into it. People were busy filling grocery bags with orders.

I found an employee wearing a badge; likely a low-level person I don’t want to get fired, so I won’t ID her. I said I was looking for the liquor store.

“That’s not open right now,” she said. (It occurred to me later that she had been coached to say this.)

I said I wanted to buy a bottle of whiskey.

“You have to order it online,” she said.

I said I was told there was a liquor store here. She said: “It hasn’t been open for a couple of weeks.” She said the building is under construction.




© W. Blake Gray/Wine-Searcher
| Once inside the door, you are confronted with a forbidding security turnstile and no sign of a retail store.

Fine. I went around the corner and timidly opened the door for the Associates Entrance.

It’s like a jail in there. There’s a very small foyer and the rest of the office is blocked by a floor-to-ceiling orange-and-blue revolving security door that won’t open without an employee ID badge. Nobody was working inside; nobody responded to my calls of “Hello? Hello?”

There’s a button that says Press for Assistance. I did this twice in the 10 minutes I stayed in the foyer. No response. While waiting, I read the legal notices on the wall. One is a City of Los Angeles Tax Registration Certificate. It gives the address: 3334 N San Fernando Rd Unit 101. I’m here! This intimidating, unstaffed foyer is the Amazon secret liquor store!

Here are the ways in which this violates the license issued by the state of California:

* All alcoholic beverages offered for sale by delivery are supposed to be displayed in the “store”. In fact, there was no display of alcoholic beverages.

* All alcoholic beverages offered for sale by delivery are supposed to be conveniently available in “the store”. In fact, there were no alcoholic beverages available.

* On each day of the week when alcohol is offered for delivery, the store is supposed to be open for at least half of those hours. Prime Now offers alcohol deliveries from 8am to midnight, so the store should be open for at least eight hours. I was there at midday, 12:30 to 1:30pm. There was no store! So it wasn’t open.

* The hours for the public opening of the store are supposed to be posted at the entrance to the premises. There was no such notice; only the “Restricted Area. No Trespassing. Private Property. Authorized Personnel Only” sign.

I called the California ABC to ask what the possible penalties are for egregious multiple violations of a liquor license. But I didn’t want to give away the story, so the agent I spoke to had to work with hypotheticals, and he pointed out that the ABC’s definition of “egregious” might differ from mine.

He also told me that the specific restrictions on an alcohol license like Prime Now’s come with the full knowledge and consent of the person applying.

“They are conditions that the applicant agrees to before they become the licensee,” Matthew Hydar, supervising agent for California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, told Wine-Searcher.

Is not even opening the store you agreed to open egregious? Even if so, Amazon might get off easy.

Hydar said that some first-offense violations would receive just a notice of violation.

“With multiple egregious offenses, we would look at anything from a fine, which would range from $750 to $3000, or, but not and, a 15-day license suspension,” Hydar said. “We can levy fines and suspensions and revocations. This will all depend on the investigation.”

Hydar said ABC works with local law enforcement on license violations. It won’t be hard for the LAPD to help: there’s a big police station almost directly across the street. A police officer could walk over there this very afternoon.

Hydar sent me a list of Penalty Policy Guidelines for the ABC. Most of the potential penalties Amazon can shrug off as a cost of doing business. But if Prime Now is found guilty of “Misrepresenting Material Fact on Application,” the recommended penalty is license revocation.

I don’t know if there ever was a liquor store at 3334 N San Fernando Rd, but as of last week, there wasn’t, and apparently there aren’t plans for one either. There is a construction trailer adjacent to the building, so I walked in and asked if they’re building a liquor store.

“No sir. There’s no liquor store,” the construction foreman told me. “You can order a bottle of liquor online and they’ll deliver it to you in two hours. But there’s no liquor store here.” And they’re not building one either, he said.

I had brought bubble wrap with me, preparing to bring home a bottle of rye whiskey that I was going to charge to Wine-Searcher. I got no rye whiskey. But I did get a better story than I bargained for.

You can order whiskey or wine from the Amazon warehouse at 3334 N San Fernando Rd in Los Angeles. But there’s no liquor store open to the public there, in clear violation of California law.

Credit: Source link

20 Aug

Glitter Rock

Marc Jacobs Beauty Glitter Rock See-quins Glam Glitter Eyeshadow ($28.00 for 0.12 oz.) has a darker, gray base with subtle, cool undertones packed with a ton of silver shimmer and glitter. It had nearly opaque pigmentation applied dry and had full coverage when applied with a wet brush. The texture was loosely-pressed, slightly drier and chunkier, so there was some fallout during application when I used it dry. To minimize fallout and ensure a smoother application, I’d highly recommend using it with a dampened brush. This shade stayed on well for eight and a half hours and had light fallout over time.

Note: The ingredient list shows Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET glitter) as an ingredient, but there were no warnings on the box nor on the product listing. It turns out that some of the previously released shades also include Polyethylene Terephthalate. The product is marketed for eyes, and it is called eyeshadow. Typically, products containing Polyethylene Terephthalate often come with a warning that they are “not intended for use around the immediate eye area” (like ColourPop Pressed Glitters), but there have been an increasing number of instances where brands include it and market those products for eyes specifically (like Urban Decay Heavy Metal Glitter Gels and Glossier Play Glitter Gelees).

Formula Overview

$28.00/0.12 oz. – $233.33 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to add a “super-shimmering dimension to any look” with a “demi-pressed process” that has “high-impact dazzle with smooth glide and bold color.” Per the brand, it can be “packed on for intense glitter or blended for a soft wash of sparkle.” They recommend packing it on with a fingertip or using a flat, synthetic brush in a “gentle pressing motion.” I was surprised at how well they applied with a flat, synthetic brush, as I was able to apply all six shades using a flat, synthetic brush (MAC 247s and 242s) and gently pressed the product against my lid and have most of the product adhere without lots of fallout. When I pressed on an eyeshadow, I gently press and then pull in a direction (depending on what and where I’m applying). The formula yielded very shiny, sparkling color that was intense and bright while still offering pigmentation from the base color, too.

They have a very loosely-packed texture–they seem more like a 40-60% loose product, and it was important to use the included “pigment press” to keep the surface flat. I also found that a little went a long way with most shades, and I could see fallout becoming an issue if too much product was on the brush. I usually just pressed the brush gentle on the surface and that was good enough for coverage on my lid. They lasted for eight and a half hours on me before creasing faintly, and there was slight fallout over time but nothing that reached the point where it seemed distracting/noticeable to anyone looking at me. Frankly, I was extremely impressed with how easily they applied, adhered, and lasted on me while delivering on high impact dazzle and bold color. Using fingertips worked for getting even adhesion, but I have always found it harder to be precise with my fingertips on my lid, and I did feel like my fingertip was picking up more product than I needed so there was a bit more fallout when I attempted using my fingertips.

Browse all of our Marc Jacobs Beauty See-quins Glam Glitter Eyeshadow swatches.

Pop Rox

Marc Jacobs Beauty Pop Rox See-quins Glam Glitter Eyeshadow ($28.00 for 0.12 oz.) is a medium-dark plum with warm undertones and a glittering finish with flashes of gold and pink. It had good color coverage applied dry, but it really needed to be applied with fingertips or a dampened brush for full coverage that also appeared brighter, warmer, and smoother. This shade left a bluish stain behind, too, which was unusual. The consistency felt more loosely-pressed in the jar (as it was) and seemed to have more sparkle/glitter than some of the original shades released in the formula, so there was a touch of fallout during application (though less than you’d expect). It wore well for nine hours on me with very minimal fallout over time.

Note: The ingredient list shows Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET glitter) as an ingredient, but there were no warnings on the box nor on the product listing. It turns out that some of the previously released shades also include Polyethylene Terephthalate. The product is marketed for eyes, and it is called eyeshadow. Typically, products containing Polyethylene Terephthalate often come with a warning that they are “not intended for use around the immediate eye area” (like ColourPop Pressed Glitters), but there have been an increasing number of instances where brands include it and market those products for eyes specifically (like Urban Decay Heavy Metal Glitter Gels and Glossier Play Glitter Gelees).

Formula Overview

$28.00/0.12 oz. – $233.33 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to add a “super-shimmering dimension to any look” with a “demi-pressed process” that has “high-impact dazzle with smooth glide and bold color.” Per the brand, it can be “packed on for intense glitter or blended for a soft wash of sparkle.” They recommend packing it on with a fingertip or using a flat, synthetic brush in a “gentle pressing motion.” I was surprised at how well they applied with a flat, synthetic brush, as I was able to apply all six shades using a flat, synthetic brush (MAC 247s and 242s) and gently pressed the product against my lid and have most of the product adhere without lots of fallout. When I pressed on an eyeshadow, I gently press and then pull in a direction (depending on what and where I’m applying). The formula yielded very shiny, sparkling color that was intense and bright while still offering pigmentation from the base color, too.

They have a very loosely-packed texture–they seem more like a 40-60% loose product, and it was important to use the included “pigment press” to keep the surface flat. I also found that a little went a long way with most shades, and I could see fallout becoming an issue if too much product was on the brush. I usually just pressed the brush gentle on the surface and that was good enough for coverage on my lid. They lasted for eight and a half hours on me before creasing faintly, and there was slight fallout over time but nothing that reached the point where it seemed distracting/noticeable to anyone looking at me. Frankly, I was extremely impressed with how easily they applied, adhered, and lasted on me while delivering on high impact dazzle and bold color. Using fingertips worked for getting even adhesion, but I have always found it harder to be precise with my fingertips on my lid, and I did feel like my fingertip was picking up more product than I needed so there was a bit more fallout when I attempted using my fingertips.

Browse all of our Marc Jacobs Beauty See-quins Glam Glitter Eyeshadow swatches.

Smash Glitz

Marc Jacobs Beauty Smash Glitz See-quins Glam Glitter Eyeshadow ($28.00 for 0.12 oz.) is a soft pink with warmer undertones and flecks of silver glitter over a metallic finish. The consistency was more emollient in its base, almost like it was more composed of a ton of shimmer/sparkle/glitter and very little base pigment leaving the base more transparent. I found it was a bit overly emollient so the product slid around rather than adhered and built up or blended out around the edges.

As a result, I ended up with more fallout from fussing with this shade compared to others in the formula. It worked just fine for packing onto the inner tearduct or patting onto the center of the lid for a halo eye, where blending was less critical or spreading over a larger area wasn’t necessary. It had semi-opaque pigmentation applied dry as well as with a dampened brush. It stayed on well for eight hours with light fallout over time.

Note: The ingredient list shows Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET glitter) as an ingredient, but there were no warnings on the box nor on the product listing. It turns out that some of the previously released shades also include Polyethylene Terephthalate. The product is marketed for eyes, and it is called eyeshadow. Typically, products containing Polyethylene Terephthalate often come with a warning that they are “not intended for use around the immediate eye area” (like ColourPop Pressed Glitters), but there have been an increasing number of instances where brands include it and market those products for eyes specifically (like Urban Decay Heavy Metal Glitter Gels and Glossier Play Glitter Gelees).

Formula Overview

$28.00/0.12 oz. – $233.33 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to add a “super-shimmering dimension to any look” with a “demi-pressed process” that has “high-impact dazzle with smooth glide and bold color.” Per the brand, it can be “packed on for intense glitter or blended for a soft wash of sparkle.” They recommend packing it on with a fingertip or using a flat, synthetic brush in a “gentle pressing motion.” I was surprised at how well they applied with a flat, synthetic brush, as I was able to apply all six shades using a flat, synthetic brush (MAC 247s and 242s) and gently pressed the product against my lid and have most of the product adhere without lots of fallout. When I pressed on an eyeshadow, I gently press and then pull in a direction (depending on what and where I’m applying). The formula yielded very shiny, sparkling color that was intense and bright while still offering pigmentation from the base color, too.

They have a very loosely-packed texture–they seem more like a 40-60% loose product, and it was important to use the included “pigment press” to keep the surface flat. I also found that a little went a long way with most shades, and I could see fallout becoming an issue if too much product was on the brush. I usually just pressed the brush gentle on the surface and that was good enough for coverage on my lid. They lasted for eight and a half hours on me before creasing faintly, and there was slight fallout over time but nothing that reached the point where it seemed distracting/noticeable to anyone looking at me. Frankly, I was extremely impressed with how easily they applied, adhered, and lasted on me while delivering on high impact dazzle and bold color. Using fingertips worked for getting even adhesion, but I have always found it harder to be precise with my fingertips on my lid, and I did feel like my fingertip was picking up more product than I needed so there was a bit more fallout when I attempted using my fingertips.

Browse all of our Marc Jacobs Beauty See-quins Glam Glitter Eyeshadow swatches.

Star Dust

Marc Jacobs Beauty Star Dust See-quins Glam Glitter Eyeshadow ($28.00 for 0.12 oz.) is a bright, medium orange with strong, warm undertones and flashes of gold and pink sparkle and glitter. It had good pigmentation applied dry as well as with a dampened brush with the dampened application yielding a brighter, more sparkling finish that looked smoother on my skin. The texture was loosely pressed but had good adherence and minimal fallout (especially considering how much sparkle and glitter was in it!), and it was easy to blend out along the edges. Its lasted well for nine hours on me with very little fallout over time.

Note: The ingredient list shows Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET glitter) as an ingredient, but there were no warnings on the box nor on the product listing. It turns out that some of the previously released shades also include Polyethylene Terephthalate. The product is marketed for eyes, and it is called eyeshadow. Typically, products containing Polyethylene Terephthalate often come with a warning that they are “not intended for use around the immediate eye area” (like ColourPop Pressed Glitters), but there have been an increasing number of instances where brands include it and market those products for eyes specifically (like Urban Decay Heavy Metal Glitter Gels and Glossier Play Glitter Gelees).

Formula Overview

$28.00/0.12 oz. – $233.33 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to add a “super-shimmering dimension to any look” with a “demi-pressed process” that has “high-impact dazzle with smooth glide and bold color.” Per the brand, it can be “packed on for intense glitter or blended for a soft wash of sparkle.” They recommend packing it on with a fingertip or using a flat, synthetic brush in a “gentle pressing motion.” I was surprised at how well they applied with a flat, synthetic brush, as I was able to apply all six shades using a flat, synthetic brush (MAC 247s and 242s) and gently pressed the product against my lid and have most of the product adhere without lots of fallout. When I pressed on an eyeshadow, I gently press and then pull in a direction (depending on what and where I’m applying). The formula yielded very shiny, sparkling color that was intense and bright while still offering pigmentation from the base color, too.

They have a very loosely-packed texture–they seem more like a 40-60% loose product, and it was important to use the included “pigment press” to keep the surface flat. I also found that a little went a long way with most shades, and I could see fallout becoming an issue if too much product was on the brush. I usually just pressed the brush gentle on the surface and that was good enough for coverage on my lid. They lasted for eight and a half hours on me before creasing faintly, and there was slight fallout over time but nothing that reached the point where it seemed distracting/noticeable to anyone looking at me. Frankly, I was extremely impressed with how easily they applied, adhered, and lasted on me while delivering on high impact dazzle and bold color. Using fingertips worked for getting even adhesion, but I have always found it harder to be precise with my fingertips on my lid, and I did feel like my fingertip was picking up more product than I needed so there was a bit more fallout when I attempted using my fingertips.

Browse all of our Marc Jacobs Beauty See-quins Glam Glitter Eyeshadow swatches.

Credit: Source link

20 Aug

Posted: Aug 20, 2019 / 06:17 PM EDT
Updated: Aug 20, 2019 / 06:17 PM EDT

Mental health training is underway at Coventina Day Spa. The National Alliance of Mental Health Erie is holding a two day training session for massage therapists.

The training will help therapists learn emergency procedures and coping methods in the instance a client has an emergency.

Employees will take part in role play situations and will watch videos relating to real life situations. Massage Therapists will also learn signs of depression, anxiety, and panic attacks.

“We just need to be prepared for whatever happens, because we want our guests to be happy and healthy when they’re here, and we want to be able to assist them anyway we can,” said Megan Richter, Owner, Coventina Day Spa.

Coventina Day Spa is looking to expand its mental health training to salon and skincare employees.

Credit: Source link

20 Aug

 

Italy’s Felluga family operates two main estates: Marco Felluga is based in Gradisca d’Isonzo, a province of Gorizia (the farthest west you can go in Italy, on the border with Slovenia), and Russiz Superiore can be found in Capriva del Friuli, in nearby Collio.

Today we look at a trio of these wines, one from Marco Felluga and two from Russiz Superiore.

2015 Marco Felluga Molamatta Collio Bianco – A white blend of 40% pinot bianco, 40% friulano, and 20% ribolla gialla. The 2015 Molamatta is a layered and dense wine, thick with notes of honey and lavender, lemon and lime peel, and a finish that moves from honey to straight beeswax. Notes of linen, nutmeg, and vanilla give the finish a complex yet unctuous character. All in all it’s fine for a starter, but there’s so much going on that a second glass becomes a bit overwhelming. B / $26

2018 Russiz Superiore Sauvignon Collio – 100% sauvignon blanc, with 15% fermented in oak barrels. The oak influence gives this wine a bolder body and a creamier texture than expected, with the typical grassiness and acidity of sauvignon blanc largely pushed out. Instead a vanilla note is prominent, with notes of baked apples throughout. B+ / $29

2016 Russiz Superiore Cabernet Franc Collio – 100% cabernet franc. No huge surprises here. There’s a strong thread of green vegetables and pepper running through this wine, though some acidity gives it a lift, cutting through some of the earthier elements. The body feels strangely thin, notes of green wood and cut grass becoming dominant in time as air gets into the mix. B / $29

marcofelluga.it

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2015 Marco Felluga Molamatta Collio Blanco

$26

Credit: Source link

20 Aug

“We are thrilled to team up with these innovative wine brands to make Drizly a part of their industry-leading consumer-facing technology,” said Liz Paquette, director of brand at Drizly. “Each brand’s augmented reality experience culminates with the next-level convenience of in-home delivery, letting fans pour a glass of Casillero, Trivento or Frontera wine on demand.”

Breaking New Ground: Delivering on the Immersive World of AR
Before the in-app Drizly purchase prompt appears, this trio of South American brands, imported by Fetzer Vineyards, comes to life through engaging AR experiences. Consumers are invited to download the DrinkAR app and activate the following AR experiences by pointing their smartphones at the wine labels:

Casillero del Diablo: Casillero del Diablo’s Reserva line looked to AR to bring its centuries-old legend of the Devil’s Cellar to life. Visitors take a 360˚ tour of the Casillero wine cellar, exploring fire-lit caverns as the brand’s namesake legend of the Devil—rumored to have guarded the cellar for over 140 years—plays in the background. Twice named the second most powerful wine brand in the world,2 Casillero is best known as a leader in premium imported Cabernet Sauvignon.3

Trivento: Premium Argentine brand Trivento—the official wine of Major League Soccer—delivers the first interactive AR game in the wine industry, marrying soccer and wine in a gamification first. Following a label scan of a Trivento Reserve bottle, users are invited to express their fandom on the virtual field, shooting penalty kicks and climbing up a continually updated leaderboard to the sound of a cheering crowd.

Frontera: The #1 South American popular import and a Top 10 popular import overall,4 Frontera has mastered the art of crafting delectable wine-based cocktails. The Chilean brand’s AR experience, now available by scanning 750ml bottles, offers a step-by-step, engaging guide to mixing batch cocktails featuring Frontera wine, classic spirits, fresh fruit and herbs. Creative cocktail recipes like Spiced Sangria; the ever-popular summer sipper, Frosé; and Paloma Blanca come to life to a soundtrack of curated beats that set the tone for a festive night in with friends.

Accessibility and Engagement: Building Brand Loyalists
In today’s market, sales made on smartphones account for over 70% of total eCommerce purchases.5  As the largest platform for online alcohol, with staggering year-over-year growth of 90%,6 Drizly offers wine brands an attractive proposition within the AR environment.

“Our first-of-its-kind partnership with Drizly underscores our commitment to creating meaningful connections with consumers—wherever they are,” said Rodrigo Maturana, vice president of marketing for Fetzer Vineyards. “By integrating Drizly into AR experiences for these three powerful brands, we’re building on consumer engagement with the convenience of in-home delivery, making our import brands more accessible than ever.”

DrinkAR is available for download in the Apple Store and Google Play, or at DrinkAR.co.

About Fetzer Vineyards
Celebrating over 50 years of acclaimed winegrowing, Fetzer Vineyards was founded in 1968 in Mendocino County, California. An award-winning purveyor of wines and spirits spanning multiple origins and available in more than 50 countries worldwide, Fetzer Vineyards is a leader in sustainable business practices, organic winegrowing, and craftsmanship in the cellar.

In addition to robust offerings under the winery’s flagship Fetzer label, the winery also crafts the leading wine from organic grapes, Bonterra Organic Vineyards, named American Winery of the Year by Wine Enthusiast magazine in 2016. Other California offerings include Adorada, Anthony’s Hill, Beckon, Relay, Sanctuary Wines and 1000 Stories, the original Bourbon barrel-aged wine. Part of global winery Viña Concha y Toro, Fetzer Vineyards imports iconic South American selections such as Chile’s most-acclaimed wine, Don Melchor, and the Cono Sur, Viña Maipo, Marques de Casa Concha, Casillero del Diablo and Frontera labels from Chile, in addition to Argentina’s Trivento Reserve. Recently, Fetzer Vineyards entered the ultra-luxury wine and spirits category by forging a partnership with Kentucky Peerless Distilling Co. to sell its historic craft rye whiskey and Bourbon.

About Drizly
Drizly is North America’s largest alcohol marketplace and the best way to shop beer, wine, and liquor. With the speed and convenience of on-demand delivery in under 60 minutes, customers can easily browse and order their favorites through the Drizly website or mobile app. By partnering with the best retail stores in over 100 markets in North America, Drizly provides consumers a rich e-commerce experience that offers unrivaled selection, competitive pricing, and personalized content to users of legal drinking age. Drizly operates across the United States and Canada, from Austin to Boston, Calgary to Tampa, New York City to Denver (and beyond). Backed by world-class institutional investors, the company has raised over $67 million to date. drizly.com

1 Timing may vary and subject to availability in different markets.
2 Source: Global Wine Brand Power Index, 2018 & 2019.
3 Source: IRI/TTL US/750ML/$ Sales, Vol Sales, Distribution/L52 Wks W/E 3.17.19, #2 premium imported Cabernet Sauvignon.
4 Source: IRI/ TTL US /TABLE/ L52 weeks W/E 6/23/19.
5 Source: Kressman, J. (2017). Mobile Purchasing Keeps Ramping Up in the US. eMarketer Retail.
6 Source: Drizly internal data.

SOURCE Fetzer Vineyards

Related Links

http://www.fetzer.com

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20 Aug

Guess this is a week of palettes on sale at Sephora? I wonder if this is how they’re providing some access to non-Rouges and VIBs during the Summer Bonus Event.  There are several Viseart Eyeshadow Palettes that are 30% off, plus VIBs and Rouges can get an additional 20% off with code SUMMERSAVE (ends 8/27).

Viseart Palettes on Sale

  • Viseart Golden Hour Eyeshadow Palette ($34, was $49, $27.20 for Rouges, $28.90 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Liasion Eyeshadow Palette ($34, was $49, $27.20 for Rouges, $28.90 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Libertine Eyeshadow Palette ($34, was $49, $27.20 for Rouges, $28.90 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Tryst Eyeshadow Palette ($34, was $49, $27.20 for Rouges, $28.90 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Petit Pro Eyeshadow Palette ($21, was $30, $16.80 for Rouges, $17.85 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Petit Pro 2 Eyeshadow Palette ($21, was $30, $16.80 for Rouges, $17.85 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Theory I Cashmere Palette ($32, was $45, $25.60 for Rouges, $27.20 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Theory II Minx Palette ($32, was $45, $25.60 for Rouges, $27.20 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Theory III Chroma Palette ($32, was $45, $25.60 for Rouges, $27.20 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Theory IV Amethyst Palette ($32, was $45, $25.60 for Rouges, $27.20 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Theory V Nuance Palette ($32, was $45, $25.60 for Rouges, $27.20 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches
  • Viseart Theory VII Siren Palette ($32, was $45, $25.60 for Rouges, $27.20 for VIBs) — Review/Swatches

We try to approve comments within 24 hours (and reply to them within 72 hours) but can sometimes get
behind and appreciate your patience! 🙂 If you have general feedback,
product review requests, off-topic questions, or need technical support, please contact us directly. Thank you for your patience!

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20 Aug

(WTXL) — Children in Franklin, Jackson and Liberty counties will now have access to mental health and counseling services through an online platform.

Let’s Talk Interactive, Inc,

has unveiled

63 Telehealth Kiosks and 63 Telehealth iPads Portals

in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Franklin, Jackson, and Liberty counties.

The portals were deployed as part of efforts from First Lady Casey DeSantis’ Hope for Healing initiative, the Florida Department of Children & Families (DCF) and Big Bend Community Based Care (BBCBC).

“First Lady DeSantis, Big Bend Community Based Care and DCF are spearheading a cutting-edge initiative to tackle one of the nation’s leading crises – mental illness,” said Arthur Cooksey, Founder, Let’s Talk Interactive, Inc. “Our goal is to provide unparalleled access to quality healthcare to in hard to reach communities – especially, in this instance, for school-aged children impacted by Hurricane Michael.”

Thanks to the portals, students in those Hurricane Michael affected counties will be able access counseling services and psychiatric care during the school day.

The customized Telehealth kiosks and software portals will enable more than 35,000 children to access much-needed care for those affected by life’s stressors, particularly the trauma and devastation caused by Hurricane Michael in late 2018.

“We were pleased to be the catalyst behind this concept in order to help expend access to mental health services in this area,” said Mike Watkins, the CEO of BBCBC. “These families have suffered enough tragedy and trauma for too long.”

Officials say parents or legal guardians can also be part of the sessions from work or home. For more information about Let’s Talk Interactive and its work in Florida schools, visit

http://www.letstalkinteractive.com

.


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20 Aug

Hank Wetzel’s vineyards stretch to the horizon, a swath of green straddling Sonoma County’s Russian River, farmed by generations of Wetzels for half a century.

It is a long way from Shanghai.

Nonetheless, seated outside his tasting room on a recent morning, the 68-year-old patriarch of Alexander Valley Vineyards was scrolling through photos from China on his tablet: A shot of his booth at a giant Shanghai trade show, thronged with customers. Another of Chinese restaurateurs sampling wines at a $1,000 dinner he hosted. And several of the pandas at Shanghai’s zoo.

When he began exporting to China two years ago, Wetzel had high hopes of penetrating its fast-growing imported wine market. But today, as President Trump’s trade war shows no sign of waning, “the economics of selling there are horrendous,” he said. “Our importer is keen on our wines, but every $15 bottle I sell her now ends up costing her $30. We could soon be out of business there.”

Since April 2018, in response to U.S. tariffs, China has slapped retaliatory taxes on $110 billion in U.S. imports — products as varied as electronics and soybeans. For wine, taxes and tariffs now amount to a 93% surcharge on every U.S. bottle. That’s double the amount on French wine, long favored by well-to-do Chinese. At the same time, wines from Australia and Chile, which recently signed free trade agreements with the Asian giant, are flooding into China, taxed at just 26%.

Global exporters view China as a barely tapped opportunity, given its exploding middle class and growing appetite for the quality and prestige of imported wine. The U.S. exported $1.46 billion in wine last year, 95% of it from California. China was the fifth-largest destination after the European Union, Canada, Hong Kong and Japan.

“China was our fastest-growing export market,” said Honore Comfort, vice president for international marketing at the Wine Institute, a San Francisco trade group. “We were heavily ramping up our activities there, adding restaurant promotions and cultivating relationships with key retailers.”

But U.S. wine exports to China were down by 33% in the first half of this year compared with
the same period in 2017. As the trade conflict drags on, “Chinese importers will buy from a different country,” she predicted. “We’ve worked on building those relationships for two decades. Now all of that time is basically a loss.”

In an underground cave at Alexander Valley Vineyards, the air was cool and moist. Seven thousand oak barrels were stacked three high under the vaulted ceiling. Aging inside: a dozen varieties from Chardonnay to Zinfandel.

Outside the cave, a worker moved quickly across rows of barrels, siphoning wine through a glass tube from each of them, tasting for defects and spitting out each sample. Nearby, in a small warehouse, bottles moved along a conveyor belt as one machine after another filled them with Cabernet Sauvignon, corked them, sealed them with foil and slapped on labels before two women, working briskly, packed the finished product into cases.

At the November 2018 ProWine trade show in Shanghai, customers gather at the Alexander Valley Vineyards booth as importer Rose Sun, right, offers tastings.

(Alexander Valley Vineyards)

Wetzel’s was among the first wineries established in Sonoma County and played a key role in establishing the Alexander Valley
appellation. His wines, from Cyrus, a $65 Cabernet blend aged for 24 months, to Gewürz, a $15 wine made with organic grapes, have won national and international awards.

Over decades, Wetzel cultivated markets across California, in Texas and in other U.S. states to the point of shipping 175,000 cases last year. But he had never sought business abroad until he visited China two years ago. With his sons taking over day-to-day operations and sales, Wetzel and his wife, Linda, who oversees the winery’s bookkeeping, were looking for a new adventure.

“Twenty years from now, China could be the largest wine market in the world,” Wetzel said. “We want to be ready.”

At Shanghai’s trade show, they met Rose and Jack Sun, a young couple who operate Shindy Wine. “It was the kind of small operation I was looking for,” Wetzel recalled. “They had one Australian wine, one Chilean and one producer in France. I get more attention as their only U.S. wine.”

At the show, he was struck by the level of sophistication as hundreds of Chinese stopped by his booth. Although the vast majority of wine consumed in China is low-end domestic product, high-quality imports are gaining social cachet through social media and a savvy new breed of trained sommeliers.

Last fall, Wetzel hosted the Suns in Sonoma County. “We ate meals and drank wine for three days,” he said. “We showed them our harvest so they could go back to China and tell our story. We became friends.”

Alexander Valley Vineyards shipped just 750 cases to China last year
— certainly no competition to large wineries such as Gallo and Mondavi, which have marketed there for decades. “The wine business moves slowly, like a turtle,” Wetzel said. “It takes a long time to build relationships.”

Linda Wetzel and Rose Sun, right, at the 2018 ProWine trade show in Shanghai.Linda Wetzel and Rose Sun, right, at the 2018 ProWine trade show in Shanghai.

At the November 2018 ProWine trade show in Shanghai, Linda Wetzel, left, and Rose Sun man a booth offering tastings of the Sonoma County wine.

(Alexander Valley Vineyards)

Preserving those connections takes continuous effort.

This week, he will embark on his third trip to Shanghai, for the opening of China’s first Costco, which has bought 250 cases of his wine. In June, while it was in transit, China imposed its latest tariff of 15%. Costco agreed to absorb half the increase, with the Suns taking the other half.

“There’s a dinner with Costco’s buyer,” Wetzel said. “I’m interested to see how they present the goods with these hefty prices.”

Wetzel also plans to travel with the Suns to Anhui, a province west of Shanghai, where they are opening a wine store. But with the trade war, “I expect to get an earful,” he said. “I hope this won’t be the end of our relationship, but the mood right now is pretty ugly. I don’t see how things could get much worse.”

Fellow exporters have been sharing the pain. “Even larger wineries that have traded for a number of years are extremely discouraged,” said Wetzel, who was elected board chairman of the Wine Institute in June. “They’ve lost a lot of business in the last six months.”

Dwight Bonewell, director of West Coast Wine Group in Napa, began exporting relatively inexpensive wine to China 12 years ago, sourcing grapes from the Central Valley. He sold his own brands and produced private-label wines for Chinese companies. With 20 distributors in China, Bonewell was on track to ship 43,000 cases this year.

“We thought we were going to have a banner year,” he said.

Now he expects to sell just 7,000, tallying his loss at about $1 million.

“The moment duties went up, many of our customers said, ‘We can buy, but you have to absorb the difference.’ But we can’t do that.”

Despite the setback, Bonewell said he expects his wine originally destined for China will sell in the U.S. market. “We are not giving up on China,” he said. “It is a huge market. We’ll wait for it to come back.”

Wineries that export more expensive bottles have suffered less from the tariffs, as wealthier Chinese can better absorb the price increases.

“While our exports to China are off in volume, they are up over 30% in value year-to-date,” offsetting the tariff, said Ryan Stewart, director of international sales for Foley Family Wines in Santa Rosa, which owns vineyards in California, Oregon, Washington and New Zealand. “Our portfolio is more skewed to premium and luxury price points.”

Nonetheless, he added, “Several discussions with potential new import partners in China have been temporarily put on hold.”

At Wine Intelligence, a London consulting firm that
tracks the global market, Chief Operating Officer Richard Halstead points to the “extraordinary amount of money” Australian and Chilean brands are spending to build China distribution. “They are squeezing out countries that don’t have favorable tariff regimes,” he said.

Alexander Valley Vineyards hosts a dinner in Shanghai to promote its wineAlexander Valley Vineyards hosts a dinner in Shanghai to promote its wine

In November 2018, Hank Wetzel of Alexander Valley Vineyards in Healdsburg hosted a dinner in Shanghai to sell his wine to Chinese importers and restaurateurs.

(Alexander Valley Vineyards)

U.S. wine sales to China are a small target for a trade war, compared with motor vehicles, semiconductor components or soybeans — just 1.1 million cases last year out of 56.7 million cases that China imported globally. “But wine often gets involved in trade disputes because it has cultural symbolism,” Halstead said. “As China views it, it is about hitting a misbehaving trade partner where it hurts.”

In June, Trump took aim at French wine, complaining that it is allowed into the U.S. virtually tariff-free while France imposes duties on U.S. wine. “It’s not fair,” he told a television interviewer.

In Sonoma County, Wetzel said he voted for Trump because “he was a businessman…. But in the short term, these tariffs are not working.”

Meanwhile, he is taking the long view. “I’m going to see my importer with hat in hand,” he said. “I hate to think our investment is all dashed because of this trade war. But if it is, we’ll try again in five or 10 years. I hope this will pass sooner or later.”


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