July 20, 2019 // Archive

Date based archive
20 Jul

Not many successful businesses strive for fewer purchases of their products, yet it’s this kind of counter-intuitive approach that’s gaining some traction in the wine industry.

It comes at an interesting moment, for wine and the beverage alcohol business in general: the “sober curious” movement continues to gain momentum, no- or low-alcohol beverages are elbowing their way onto the shelves, and a modern day temperance movement underscores consumer desire for a healthy lifestyle, even while the definition of “healthy” in relation to wine varies widely and sometimes erroneously.

The wine industry could afford to take a new tack, which brings us to the counter-intuitive strategy of advocating for drinking less wine as a positive move forward. “Positive,” that is, in the sense of drinking responsibly rather than excessively, which commiserates with the consumer base that’s leaning toward a healthier lifestyle. It’s also an approach taken by the beer industry, as demonstrated in this advertisement from Heineken, with the message of “just one beer is one too many.”

One parallel example from the wine industry is called the Responsible Wine Tasting Charter, formulated by French winemaker Bruno Le Breton of BLB Vignobles and Hussam al Mallak, a physician who specializes in alcohol addiction. The Charter, which was initially written in 2015, has evolved in its maturity and its responsiveness to the changing environment of consumer sentiment. It’s an opportune moment to explore those changes, in these three ways.

Champagne glasses with white balls on pink background minimal style top view

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Promoting Enjoyment

“At the beginning the idea of the Charter was to provide tools on how to drink responsibly, and now we are promoting how to enjoy it,” said Morgane Le Breton of BLB Vignobles.

The original iteration of the Charter focused on the basic components of responsible wine drinking, such as eating food while drinking wine and enjoying wine in the company of others. Today, it’s important to go further.

“We already have the ‘what’ of drinking wine,” she said. “Now we really want to focus on the how and the why.” That means experiencing the wine so that you know what’s in your glass beyond whether it’s a red blend or Cabernet Sauvignon. “It means finding the right balance and the right lifestyle.”

Revised to Focus on Customer Care

The focus of the recently revised charter goes beyond customer service and even beyond the customer experience, to focus on customer care.

Customer care, for Le Breton, means focusing on the special moments in people’s lives when they’ll open a bottle and share it around, so that it isn’t an individual or isolated thing. Drinking wine as part of a community is a fundamental component of responsible drinking.

Finding the right balance and the right lifestyle when it comes to wine is something good that consumers do for themselves and yes, Le Breton said, that could mean not drinking as much as they used to, especially if they buy better or higher-priced bottles. But it also means knowing they’re doing something good for a company that cares about the same things they care about, like the environment and responsible consumption.

Drinking Alcohol the Right Way

It isn’t about not drinking alcohol. It’s about drinking alcohol well, and in the right way.

Consider the difference, for example, between wine, beer and spirits. They are all alcoholic beverages, but they’re distinctly different products. “You don’t drink and enjoy a glass of wine the same way you drink and enjoy a shot of vodka,” Le Breton said. “They have different glasses, relate to different places, different people, different situations, different moments of life.”

But drinking alcohol in “the right way” doesn’t mean focusing on rules or protocol, or perpetuating a culture of wine that is inaccessible or only available to certain people who are “in the know.” It’s much simpler, and more pleasurable, than that.

If you have a bottle of wine, Le Breton said, you instantly turn something into a celebration. “I think we have to focus on this aspect of wine. We have the best products and it’s something very special that people make with care. We can change the way of consuming it, and not just the type of wine. We can change how, when, where and with whom. I think it’s more about how [the wine industry] is going to promote that.”


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20 Jul
Colour Pop Blush Stix  
Colour Pop Blush Stix  
Colour Pop Blush Stix  

This week, ColourPop Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a new, cream blush in a twist-up format, which launched in 18 different shades. The formula is supposed to “blend effortlessly” with a “natural, skin-like finish” that can be layered or applied on bare skin. The brand recommends applying directly from the tube for heavier coverage and using a brush to pick up product for less coverage, though the coverage “easily builds colour to your heart’s desire.” They dry down to a semi-set finish–lightly dewy, definitely “natural, skin-like” in appearance, but not overly tacky or really wet-looking. I haven’t found that they migrate or move around much, so the formula is still longer-wearing at seven to nine hours with minimal movement. They have applied well and worn well over foundation thus far, too. They are not transfer-proof but are transfer-resistant; they won’t smear around with an inadvertent touch but aren’t fully locked down.

The pigmentation varied a bit from shade to shade, but most shades were semi-opaque to fully opaque when applied directly from the tube in one “swipe” motion, though I think mimicking this on cheeks isn’t quite as easily done as compared to my arm. I preferred picking up product on my fingertip, patting on the apple of my cheek and diffusing upward and outward, then using a clean fingertip to diffuse and soften the edges as needed. I appreciated that even the deeper hues didn’t seem to “sink” into my pores and were as easy to apply and blend out as very light, more my-skin-but-better (literally, my skin!) hues. I would describe the formula was buildable from semi-sheer to medium with semi-opaque coverage possible, but there’s enough slip in the formula that it starts to sheer out noticeably even when applied more heavily.

The consistency was lightly emollient, lightweight, and thin with good spreadability and movement; it didn’t lift up base products but still worked well over bare skin. I didn’t experience it lifting up or creating patchiness over time on top of foundation, even when I set the foundation initially, but I would recommend (same as I would for most cream-based cheek formulas!) to pair with a less-matte foundation for optimal results (the dewy finish plays well with a more skin-like base).

Colour Pop Mini Me Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a bright pop of peony pink with subtle, warm undertones and a natural sheen. Applied, it had a…

Colour Pop Mini Me Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a bright pop of peony pink with subtle, warm undertones and a natural sheen. Applied, it had a…

Colour Pop Aloha Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a muted, peachy-orange with warm undertones and a natural sheen. It had buildable pigmentation…

Colour Pop Aloha Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a muted, peachy-orange with warm undertones and a natural sheen. It had buildable pigmentation…

Colour Pop Splash Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a bright pop of pink-coral with warm undertones and a natural sheen. It had opaque color payoff…

Colour Pop Splash Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a bright pop of pink-coral with warm undertones and a natural sheen. It had opaque color payoff…

Colour Pop 25/8 Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a soft, muted mid-tone pink-coral with warmer undertones and a natural sheen. It had buildable…

Colour Pop 25/8 Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a soft, muted mid-tone pink-coral with warmer undertones and a natural sheen. It had buildable…

Colour Pop Hooked Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a muted, medium orange with warm undertones and a dusting of fine, gold pearl. The texture was…

Colour Pop Hooked Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a muted, medium orange with warm undertones and a dusting of fine, gold pearl. The texture was…

Colour Pop Flamenco Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a rich, fuchsia pink with cool, blue undertones and a satin finish. It had opaque pigmentation…

Colour Pop Flamenco Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a rich, fuchsia pink with cool, blue undertones and a satin finish. It had opaque pigmentation…

Colour Pop Sidewayz Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a medium coral with warm undertones, but leans pinker, and warmer, coppery-gold pearl. It had…

Colour Pop Sidewayz Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a medium coral with warm undertones, but leans pinker, and warmer, coppery-gold pearl. It had…

Colour Pop Cool It Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a muted, medium pink with warm undertones and a dewy sheen. It had more opaque coverage when…

Colour Pop Cool It Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a muted, medium pink with warm undertones and a dewy sheen. It had more opaque coverage when…

Colour Pop Totes Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a rich coral with warm undertones and a barely-there pearl paired with a dewy finish. The blush…

Colour Pop Totes Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a rich coral with warm undertones and a barely-there pearl paired with a dewy finish. The blush…

Colour Pop Wallaby Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a light-medium berry with subtle, cool undertones and cooler, lavender pearl. The shimmer was…

Colour Pop Wallaby Blush Stix ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a light-medium berry with subtle, cool undertones and cooler, lavender pearl. The shimmer was…

We try to approve comments within 24 hours (and reply to them within 72 hours) but can sometimes get behind and appreciate your patience! 🙂 If you have general feedback, product review requests, off-topic questions, or need technical support, please contact us directly. Thank you for your patience!

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20 Jul

The Florida State Board of Education voted this week to require public schools to provide students with mental health education.

Under the new directive, the department said in an announcement that schools will be required to “provide students in grades 6-12 at least five hours of mental health instruction” on an annual basis. 

The instruction will be related to youth mental health awareness and assistance. It will also focus on providing students with an “awareness of signs and symptoms, process for getting or seeking help for themselves or others,” as well as an awareness of accessible mental health resources, including the National Suicide Prevention Hotline, the department said.

“This is just the beginning. It’s no secret that mental illness robs students of the ability to reach their full potential, and we are joining forces to combat this disease and give our students the tools they need to thrive,” Commissioner of Education Richard Corcoran said in a statement.

“We are going to reinvent school-based mental health awareness in Florida, and we will be the number one state in the nation in terms of mental health outreach and school safety – all because of the Governor’s and First Lady’s remarkable vision. As usual, we will be a model of innovation and reform for other states to mimic,” he continued. “First Lady DeSantis has taken the lead to get the ball rolling with her recent Hope for Healing launch, and we are building on the momentum of her great leadership.”

Florida’s first lady, Casey DeSantis, said that she and her husband, Gov. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisTo win over Midwesterners, Democrats should rethink school choice stance DeSantis wants statue of civil rights activist to replace Confederate figure on Capitol Hill Florida couple wins right to plant vegetables in front yard after years-long legal battle MORE (R), have “traveled the state and have heard from many families who voice concern about the struggles that adversely affect so many of our children.”

“We know that 50 percent of all mental illness cases begin by age 14, so we are being proactive in our commitment to provide our kids with the necessary tools to see them through their successes and challenges.” 

“Providing mental health instruction is another important step forward in supporting our families,” she added in a statement.

It remains unclear when the mental health education will be incorporated into the public school curriculum in the state.


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20 Jul

We’ve covered the wines of Left Coast Cellars several times in the past, and today we’re taking a spin through some of the more warm weather wines of this Oregon winery, including a seasonal sparkler.

2017 Left Coast Cellars Queen Bee Bubbly Honey Tirage Sparkling Wine Willamette Valley – 100% pinot noir, for secondary fermentation the winery uses estate honey instead of other sources of sugar. The result is a pale pink sparkler, the use of honey coming through with surprising clarity. To be honest, that honey tends to overpower the delicate wine underneath, making for a somewhat earthy experience at times, masking the gooseberry and lemon notes underneath. The finish ends up a bit on the sour side. B / $36

2018 Left Coast Cellars Estate Rose Willamette Valley – This annually produced wine is a field blend of sorts, its composition changing year to year. For 2018 I don’t have any varietal specifics (yet), but the finished product is rather muddy, a blend of brown butter, guava nectar, grapefruit peel, and mixed white flowers — flavors that don’t always work well together. While modestly appealing as a summer sipper, there’s a fairly heavy, coconut-driven sweetness on the finish that makes for a somewhat cloying experience. B- / $24

2017 Left Coast Cellars Pinot Gris The Orchard Willamette Valley – Quite dry at first, with ample notes of lemon, grapefruit, and a bit of pineapple to add some sweetness. Lots of florals on the back end give the wine a rather perfumed character, with hints of coconut on the finish. B+ / $24

2018 Left Coast Cellars White Pinot Noir Willamette Valley – Astringent and tight, this volatile wine makes a rough first impression with notes of vinegar and and cooked lemon juice prominent. Greenery notes develop as the palate builds, which the tough, woody finish does few favors for. A miss for me. C- / $24

leftcoastwine.com

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2017 Left Coast Cellars Queen Bee Bubbly Honey Tirage Sparkling Wine Willamette Valley

$36

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20 Jul

California isn’t convinced that Napa County is adequately managing groundwater that sustains the area’s vineyards, wineries, rural residents and Napa River fish.

State Department of Water Resources officials emphasized they aren’t claiming well water use is harming the subterranean reservoir beneath the Napa Valley floor. Rather, they said a more than 1,000-page basin report submitted by Napa County doesn’t allow them to make a judgement.

“The department staff found no evidence that the county had managed the subbasin within its sustainable yield over a period of at least 10 years,” a letter to the county from Taryn Ravazzini of the Department of Water Resources stated.

Unless the county convinces the state to reverse this tentative finding, it will have to form a groundwater sustainability agency to create a Napa Valley subbasin sustainability plan. The county maintains it has done the equivalent of this work, while some local environmentalists disagree.

The county has 30 days to convince the state it is mistaken. County officials said they are reviewing the Department of Water Resources report and will submit a response to the agency.

Angwin resident Mike Hackett wants the county to form a groundwater agency. He questioned the approach to groundwater that county officials have taken so far with a consulting firm.

“They want to be told everything is fine, when, in fact, it’s not fine,” Hackett said.

Hackett wants the county to go beyond what the state is requiring. He favors a holistic approach that looks at the Napa Valley subbasin, other local groundwater basins, the Napa River and waterways, as opposed to what he sees as a segmented approach.

“All of our water resources are connected,” Hackett said. “Everything is connected.”

Napa County is responding to a state push to ensure that communities don’t overtax groundwater supplies. The state’s groundwater program began in 2014. Researchers say unregulated groundwater use over decades has caused parts of the San Joaquin Valley to subside as much as two inches a month.

California requires communities in certain groundwater basins to form groundwater sustainability agencies. However, it allows communities to avoid taking this step if they can show they are already doing a good job managing groundwater.

Napa County defined “sustainability” as using groundwater “in a manner that can be maintained indefinitely without causing unacceptable economic, environmental or social consequences, while protecting economic, environmental and social benefits.”

But the county didn’t set thresholds of when groundwater use would produce significant and unreasonable effects, Department of Water Resources staff concluded. Nor did the county manage the Napa Valley subbasin to any threshold.

“Because the county has not established such thresholds or defined conditions giving rise to undesirable results, the county can only speculate whether undesirable results have occurred,” state Department of Water Resources staff wrote.

This assessment in no way diminishes efforts by Napa County to understand more about groundwater, state staff wrote. These efforts will likely be a foundation to develop a groundwater sustainability plan.

Napa County’s 2016 Napa Valley basin analysis report found that the Napa Valley subbasin has a sustainable yield of 17,000 acre-feet to 20,000 acre-feet annually. Pumping at the time – which was during a drought—averaged 17,506 acre-feet annually. One acre-foot is about 326,000 gallons.

Pumping in 2017 was 15,831 acre-feet and in 2018 was 17,889 acre-feet, the county Board of Supervisors heard at its March 19 meeting. The cumulative annual storage change in the subbasin over 30 years is positive 4,388 acre-feet.

“The fact is, we’re pumping,” Supervisor Alfredo Pedroza said at the meeting. “But the fact is it is within the sustainable yield.”

But the county has yet to prove this to the state’s satisfaction.

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20 Jul

Warm Weather

Sydney Grace Warm Weather Cream Shadow ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a medium, reddish-copper with warm undertones and a metallic sheen. It had nearly opaque pigmentation in a single layer, which adhered evenly and smoothly to my skin as the product had good spreadability without losing its intensity. The texture was lightweight, spreadable, and fluid without being too runny or too thick. It dried down quickly (so work one eye at a time!), and it was fairly set, but I was able to diffuse and soften the edges without it flaking. This shade stayed on well for 10 hours before creasing faintly on me.

  • MAC French Lesson (PiP, ) is less shimmery, lighter (95% similar).
  • Colour Pop Arrow (P, $5.00) is less shimmery, cooler (95% similar).
  • Colour Pop Bay Watch (PiP, $4.50) is less shimmery, lighter (95% similar).
  • Dior Shimmer Red Copper (PiP, ) is less shimmery, lighter (90% similar).
  • NARS Bayadere #2 (PiP, $19.00) is less shimmery, darker (90% similar).
  • Devinah Cosmetics Gild (PiP, $5.00) is more shimmery, warmer (90% similar).
  • Anastasia Rose Pink (PiP, $12.00) is less shimmery, lighter (90% similar).
  • Pat McGrath Rose Venus (P, $25.00) is more shimmery, lighter (90% similar).
  • Melt Cosmetics Bogart (PiP, ) is less shimmery, warmer (90% similar).
  • Anastasia Rose Quartz (Daytime) (LE, $12.00) is lighter (90% similar).

Formula Overview

$8.00/0.33 oz. – $24.24 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to “dry down to a smudge proof finish” that isn’t waterproof but “will last all day on the lids.” The brand recommends working “one eye at a time” as the formula “dr[ies] fairly quickly.” It is a very pigmented formula where the merest dab of product–like as little as one can physically squeeze out of the tube–is enough for most of the mobile lid.

If you’re someone who tends to use their cream eyeshadows as sheer washes of color, I think this formula is “too” pigmented and dries too quickly to make sheer application as effortless as you’d want. If you love the effect of and finish of creamier, metallic eyeshadows and want true, full coverage application, these are worth looking into. I recommend squeezing out the smallest amount of product on the back of your hand or onto a mixing palette, and then using fingertips or a flat, synthetic brush to apply to the lid. I prefer a brush as it gives more working time than when I used my fingertips.

The texture was smooth, like a liquid-cream hybrid as it wasn’t runny but it was more spreadable than a cream eyeshadow you’d find in a jar. The majority of shades applied evenly to bare skin with little effort, and the edges remained blendable enough (even as it was mostly dried down) to soften and fuse with other shades. They’re very lightweight and the majority of them sat well on my lids without emphasizing lines or texture (sometimes an issue with liquid/cream, more metallic products).

It didn’t have that dry down that felt so set and locked in that if you kept trying to blend it out (after it was dry) you’d get flaking; these never flaked or lifted. Based on past experiences–in general with cream eyeshadows–I recommend working with your powder eyeshadows first (unless you’re using it as a base), and then going in with the cream eyeshadows and going back over any areas to further blend if necessary. That being said, I was able to layer powder eyeshadow over them without them lifting or becoming patchy. They’re some of the easiest cream eyeshadows I’ve worked with to incorporate into multi-shade looks. The wear varied from eight to ten hours on me before there was slight fading or a bit of creasing.

My only complaint is that with a six-month shelf life paired with so much color payoff… one tube is so much product. These could be sold half-sized tubes and still stretch for many, many uses. I really enjoy the squeeze-tube packaging along with the smaller opening, as it made it much easier to control than some other liquid/cream products.

Browse all of our Sydney Grace Cream Shadow swatches.

Ingredients

Wish

Sydney Grace Wish Cream Shadow ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a light purple with cool undertones and a bright, metallic finish. It had nearly opaque pigmentation that applied well to bare skin with a smooth, even application that blended easily along the edges. It had a fluid texture that was spreadable but not too runny or too thin, so it retained its intensity and coverage. For sheerer coverage, I’d highly recommend applying a dab on the back of your hand or a mixing palette and then using a fluffy brush to swirl it onto the lid as it is such a pigmented product. It wore well for 10 hours before fading slightly.

Formula Overview

$8.00/0.33 oz. – $24.24 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to “dry down to a smudge proof finish” that isn’t waterproof but “will last all day on the lids.” The brand recommends working “one eye at a time” as the formula “dr[ies] fairly quickly.” It is a very pigmented formula where the merest dab of product–like as little as one can physically squeeze out of the tube–is enough for most of the mobile lid.

If you’re someone who tends to use their cream eyeshadows as sheer washes of color, I think this formula is “too” pigmented and dries too quickly to make sheer application as effortless as you’d want. If you love the effect of and finish of creamier, metallic eyeshadows and want true, full coverage application, these are worth looking into. I recommend squeezing out the smallest amount of product on the back of your hand or onto a mixing palette, and then using fingertips or a flat, synthetic brush to apply to the lid. I prefer a brush as it gives more working time than when I used my fingertips.

The texture was smooth, like a liquid-cream hybrid as it wasn’t runny but it was more spreadable than a cream eyeshadow you’d find in a jar. The majority of shades applied evenly to bare skin with little effort, and the edges remained blendable enough (even as it was mostly dried down) to soften and fuse with other shades. They’re very lightweight and the majority of them sat well on my lids without emphasizing lines or texture (sometimes an issue with liquid/cream, more metallic products).

It didn’t have that dry down that felt so set and locked in that if you kept trying to blend it out (after it was dry) you’d get flaking; these never flaked or lifted. Based on past experiences–in general with cream eyeshadows–I recommend working with your powder eyeshadows first (unless you’re using it as a base), and then going in with the cream eyeshadows and going back over any areas to further blend if necessary. That being said, I was able to layer powder eyeshadow over them without them lifting or becoming patchy. They’re some of the easiest cream eyeshadows I’ve worked with to incorporate into multi-shade looks. The wear varied from eight to ten hours on me before there was slight fading or a bit of creasing.

My only complaint is that with a six-month shelf life paired with so much color payoff… one tube is so much product. These could be sold half-sized tubes and still stretch for many, many uses. I really enjoy the squeeze-tube packaging along with the smaller opening, as it made it much easier to control than some other liquid/cream products.

Browse all of our Sydney Grace Cream Shadow swatches.

Worth the Wait

Sydney Grace Worth the Wait Cream Shadow ($8.00 for 0.33 oz.) is a bright, rich gold with warm undertones and a bright, metallic finish. It was intensely pigmented where very little went a very long way! The texture was lightweight, spreadable, and felt and looked thin on my lid, so it sat smoothly and didn’t emphasize my lid texture (despite being so metallic!). The edges could still be diffused a bit after it dried down (without disturbing the product), but you’ll want to work one eye at a time for major blending/diffusing as it dried down quickly. The eyeshadow lasted well for 10 hours without fading or creasing on me.

Formula Overview

$8.00/0.33 oz. – $24.24 Per Ounce

The formula is supposed to “dry down to a smudge proof finish” that isn’t waterproof but “will last all day on the lids.” The brand recommends working “one eye at a time” as the formula “dr[ies] fairly quickly.” It is a very pigmented formula where the merest dab of product–like as little as one can physically squeeze out of the tube–is enough for most of the mobile lid.

If you’re someone who tends to use their cream eyeshadows as sheer washes of color, I think this formula is “too” pigmented and dries too quickly to make sheer application as effortless as you’d want. If you love the effect of and finish of creamier, metallic eyeshadows and want true, full coverage application, these are worth looking into. I recommend squeezing out the smallest amount of product on the back of your hand or onto a mixing palette, and then using fingertips or a flat, synthetic brush to apply to the lid. I prefer a brush as it gives more working time than when I used my fingertips.

The texture was smooth, like a liquid-cream hybrid as it wasn’t runny but it was more spreadable than a cream eyeshadow you’d find in a jar. The majority of shades applied evenly to bare skin with little effort, and the edges remained blendable enough (even as it was mostly dried down) to soften and fuse with other shades. They’re very lightweight and the majority of them sat well on my lids without emphasizing lines or texture (sometimes an issue with liquid/cream, more metallic products).

It didn’t have that dry down that felt so set and locked in that if you kept trying to blend it out (after it was dry) you’d get flaking; these never flaked or lifted. Based on past experiences–in general with cream eyeshadows–I recommend working with your powder eyeshadows first (unless you’re using it as a base), and then going in with the cream eyeshadows and going back over any areas to further blend if necessary. That being said, I was able to layer powder eyeshadow over them without them lifting or becoming patchy. They’re some of the easiest cream eyeshadows I’ve worked with to incorporate into multi-shade looks. The wear varied from eight to ten hours on me before there was slight fading or a bit of creasing.

My only complaint is that with a six-month shelf life paired with so much color payoff… one tube is so much product. These could be sold half-sized tubes and still stretch for many, many uses. I really enjoy the squeeze-tube packaging along with the smaller opening, as it made it much easier to control than some other liquid/cream products.

Browse all of our Sydney Grace Cream Shadow swatches.

Credit: Source link

20 Jul

TULSA – The Eastern Oklahoma Veterans Affairs Health Care System will hold the 7th annual VA Mental Health Summit on Aug. 23 at the University of Tulsa.

The purpose for the Mental Health Summit is to bring together key stakeholders in the community with the goal of enhancing access to mental health services and addressing the mental health care needs of veterans and their family members. Topics will include: suicide prevention, military culture, evidence-based mental health treatments, and new initiatives to improve access to care.

Continuing education units available for licensed clinical social workers, licensed marriage and family therapists, licensed professional counselors, and psychologists. The summit will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Allen Chapman Student Union, 440 S. Gary Ave.

Registration closes Aug. 16. To register, visit Eventbrite.com and search for the event.

Credit: Source link

20 Jul

 

After nearly 20 years as president and winegrower of The Donum Estate, Anne Moller-Racke has decided to step away from the brand that she created, cultivated and cared for, opting instead to focus full energy on a more personal project—Blue Farm Wines.

“I felt like we accomplished what we set out to do back in 2011 and 2012 when Allan bought Donum,” Moller-Racke said, referring to the winery’s owners Allan and Mei Warburg, whom Moller-Racke credits for much of the success—and certainly the expansion of—Donum Estate. Since their proprietorship, Donum Estate has developed more vineyard acreage, expanded annual case production, installed 40 pieces of art throughout the property and built state-of-art hospitality and production buildings.

For Moller-Racke, the partnership also allowed her to become more involved in the winemaking process. “It brought me into the cellar. I loved it because I was making the wine, not just growing,” she said, adding that this shift provided her with understanding of what it means to be a wine grower, not just a grapegrower.

During an interview with Wine Business Monthly for the June Technical Spotlight featuring The Donum Estate, both Moller-Racke and her head winemaker, Dan Fisherman, expressed how much they appreciated that the vineyard management and the winemaking departments were interwoven. Moller-Racke’s growing decisions were based around the winemaking methods; the winemaking methods developed to portray clonal and site specificity. And the two worked closely on every blending and final bottling.

But Moller-Racke said that with the winery reaching an annual production of 6,000 to 7,000 cases (and with a goal to produce even more), as well as the completion of the new hospitality space, that inter-connectivity became lost, the business more fragmented into departments. “There’s a whole new team for hospitality…it’d be hard for me to be there and feel like I’m on the side-lines like that,” she said. “The largest team is now hospitality. And perhaps that’s the new focus. Whereas before it was production focused, maybe now it has shifted to more hospitality focused? I don’t know.”

There’s no hard feelings with the separation. Moller-Racke can honestly say she left Donum Estate in a good place: the hospitality center up-and-running and fully staffed, the new production facility completed and functioning, the last sculpture installed and the final vineyard planted. “It was like sending my baby off to college,” she said.

“Plus I looked at my own project (Blue Farm Wines), and, you know, you can’t focus on many projects with the same intensity. And The Donum got most of my attention.”

Blue Farm Wines started in 2001, with the planting of 7 acres of Pinot Noir planted at her home: a historic (and, yes, blue) Victorian farmhouse in Sonoma tucked in the bucolic fields just off of Highway 12. In 2013, Moller-Racke along with her business partner, Tim Mott (who owns 1861 Vineyard, a Pinot Noir vineyard also used in the Blue Farm Wines portfolio), decided to make the project a bit bigger by sourcing more grapes from different vineyards throughout Sonoma and increasing production. Blue Farm Wines was officially bonded that year.

“The way I make the wine is very similar because it’s the style that gives power and elegance,” Moller-Racke said, referring to low-yielding and clonal-specific vineyard blocks. As at Donum Estate, before planting her home vineyard, Moller-Racke had her soils tested and learned that most of her 7-acre parcel is home to an old riverbed and, thus, gravelly, well-drained soils. This, in-turn, informed her decision as to which Pinot Noir clones to plant and where.

Besides her own, eponymous estate vineyard, Anne Katherina Vineyard, and the 1861 Vineyard, Moller-Racke works with established, well-cared for vineyards in the Russian River (Laceroni Vineyard), Fort Ross-Seaview (King Ridge Vineyard) and Sonoma Coast (Gap’s Crown Vineyard) AVAs. Compared to her Carneros-focused project at Donum Estate, sourcing from multiple AVAs throughout the county has allowed Moller-Racke to explore different sites, different soils, different climatic conditions—and the different expressions of Pinot Noir specific to these environments. She said she enjoys the diversity, which has allowed her to learn more about what Pinot Noir is capable of—both in the vineyard and in the cellar—as she works closely with the growers of each location and takes point with the cellar work she’s learned to enjoy so immensely. 

Today, Blue Farm produces between 1,000 to 1,200 cases annually. “More than I can drink,” Moller-Racke joked. Her Anne Katherina Vineyard Estate Pinot Noir can be found at local restaurants, such as Eldorado Kitchen and Harvest Moon. The rest is sold direct-to-consumer and through her wine club, which, she estimates, includes somewhere between 100 and 200 members.

The goal, according to Moller-Racke is to grow, yet always remain boutique (somewhere in the ballpark of 2,000 annual case production) and continue on small-lot bottlings. Thus, there are no plans to build her own estate winery. Blue Farm wines are currently produced at Domaine Carneros, alongside Pinot Noir winemaker TJ Evans and with guidance from long-time friend and former Donum Estate winemaker Kenneth Juhasz.

But it is clearly Moller-Racke’s experience, ability and passion that are the driving forces behind these wines. “When you think about what Burgundy taught us, it’s really all about sites and vineyards…nurturing and understanding them” she said. “And winemaking that speaks to that understanding.”

Blue Farm Bottlings:

Anne Katherina Vineyard, Carneros – Estate Pinot Noir $65

Anne Katherina Vineyard – Farmhouse block, Carneros – Estate Pinot Noir $95

1861 Vineyard, Sonoma Valley – Estate Pinot Noir $95

King Ridge Vineyard, Fort Ross-Seaview, Pinot Noir $85

Gap’s Crown Vineyard, Sonoma Coast, Pinot Noir $65

Laceroni Vineyard, Russian River Valley, Chardonnay $70

About Blue Farm Wines

Started in 2001 by Anne Moller Racke, with the planting of seven-acres of Pinot Noir behind her historic Victorian farmhouse in Sonoma, Blue Farm Wines was founded in 2013 with the addition of the 1861 Pinot Noir vineyard. Today, it includes Burgundian grand cru style Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays from five vineyards and five AVAs within Sonoma County. These wines are crafted from Carneros, Fort Ross Seaview, Sonoma Valley, Russian River Valley, and the Sonoma Coast. The common thread is the rigorous farming and caregiving to the growing of the grapes and the winemaking is traditional; less being more. Blue Farm wines reveal exceptional discoveries from lands graced with natural gifts. To learn more, please visit www.bluefarmwines.com.

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20 Jul

Coloring: Under my name. Green eyes, s&p hair

Favorite Look: EYES—Urban Decay singles (Riff in crease, Chains on entire lid), then added a pop shimmery gold on just the center of the lid using Dandy (from the Colourpop Uh Huh Honey palette). Chanel Stylo Yeux eyeliner in Celadon lightly smudged on outer third of lower lash line, Colourpop Precision Brow Colour (gel pot) in Cool Cocoa, Tarte Lights Camera Lashes Mascara.
FACE—Estée Lauder Double Wear Makeup, Lancôme Effacernes Waterproof Concealer, RCMA No Color Powder, MAC Mineralize Blush in Sweet Enough.
LIPS—Chanel Rouge Coco Shine in Melancolie.

Most Used Products: Estée Lauder Double Wear Makeup, Lancôme Effacernes Waterproof Concealer, RCMA No Color Powder, Colourpop Precision Brow Colour (gel pot).

Beauty Discovery: This is not so much a beauty discovery as it is a beauty realization. I’ve been looking through my past “favorite look” posts on Temptalia and realized how boring I am. I’ve listed the same few looks over and over. This has motivated me to get more creative. And so, inspired by a Temptalia comment I recently read (I’m sorry, I can’t remember who posted it), I got the “Decide Now!” roulette wheel app and uploaded all my palettes plus a category called MAC singles and one called UD singles. A spin of the wheel will tell me what to use each morning. I’m allowing myself to go outside the palette for supporting colors, if necessary, because not every palette works on its own. Should be fun!

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20 Jul

‘Don’t Worry, Be Happy’ event raises thousands towards affordable mental health services  WLOX

The Mental Health Association of South Mississippi (MHA) raised thousands of dollars at their Don’t Worry, Be Happy event Friday.

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